.40 Cal get ya anything?

Discussion in 'Sports & Outdoor Adventure' started by jaymanaa, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. elcoholic

    elcoholic Just Nevermind Subscriber

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    My best friend gets a bear nearly every year and has done so for 30 years. He uses a .44 mag from close range ...
    He also uses contractors w/ dogs to run and tree them.
    He's in forestry management. The bears eat the bark off the young doug fir trees and they die. They have to control the bear population to have economically feasible sustainable forestry. They don't go to waste - he makes most excellent bear salami.
     
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  2. nj pheonix

    nj pheonix AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Am i the only one that lives in a nice neighborhood?:D

    I think if i had 1200lb bears in my neighborhood I'd want one of these too.
    I do like to hunt beer cans unarmed though.
     
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  3. mkane

    mkane AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Wouldn't live in a neighborhood where I felt I needed a firearm for protection. Everything we have here is for target shooting or hunting and we just need to go out the front door.
     
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  4. nj pheonix

    nj pheonix AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    It was meant as a Joke (i hope it was taken that way).

    Sometimes things in print come across wrong. I thought the smiley face was a tip off.
    Always easier to hear inflection in voice and see facial expression and body language.

    Besides , you think i'm foolish enough to piss off a bunch of guys with shotguns and large caliber handguns:rflmao::beerchug:
     
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  5. Alobar

    Alobar Pulling out of the Last Chance Texaco.. Subscriber

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    I agree with mkane, would not want to live in a neighborhood where crime is a concern. We most of the time don't lock our house day or night unless we are going to be gone for a few days. That said, I think most people don't want to live in a high crime area, but don't have a choice for whatever reason, work, taking care of elders etc places them in an area of risk. In those cases having a gun to protect yourself is a good option so long as you have a gun you are totally comfortable with and feel at ease with. If you live with anyone else THEY need to know that gun is loaded and ready for a fight, and either to not go near it, or have it locked up if kids are in your household or anywhere in the neighborhood. It is one thing to raise your kid around guns, and teach them gun safety, but what happens when your kid has the neighbors jerk over? DO NOT TAKE THE CHANCE! Keep it locked up in some manor where you can get to it quickly if needed.

    For myself I don't care for the semi autos because I have not used one much and don't feel completely comfortable with them. I also handload and hate a gun that tosses my brass all over the ground for me to look for and lose half of what I came with. Revolvers I never lose brass and I am never tempted to rapid fire them.
     
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  6. mkane

    mkane AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    That I would like to taste.
     
  7. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

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    No one "wants" to live in a area that has significant crime. Unfortunately, crime tends to move in. It takes 20-30 years to pay off a house. a lot can happen to a neighborhood in that span of time, and by that time one might not have the wherewithal to move away. If one did, crime would likely move in there as well.

    It is just Her-Heidiness and myself here. Hence, my piece is ALWAYS within arm's reach, or on my person. Being a Glock 27 (sub-compact .40), it is always chambered and cocked. This weapon is safe to do so, because, if in serviceable condition, it cannot go off if dropped, and one better not put their finger inside the trigger guard unless intending to pull the trigger. The safety is directly associated with the trigger, so there is no possibility of trying to fire a round with the safety on.

    This old world is just not a place to be unprepared to defend yourself. It is certainly sad, but it is true. If I lived in a place where folks felt that they could leave their doors unlocked, I would be no different, because such an area would be ripe for the picking for a one-time criminal like myself.

    I pack a sub-compact (with a grip extender for my pinky, which would hang off otherwise), because it conceals very well, and I can pack it all day with no ill effects or discomfort. I pack a .40 as a compromise between the accuracy of the 9mm and the stopping power of the .45. I use Black Talons, or Ranger SXTs (Talon without the moly coat), because they make a big mess, and do not tend to pass through. I am well-practiced, because one should be, and because a sub-compact amplifies anything you do wrong with your trigger work. I have a laser sight in my recoil spring, because night sights make you visible when you don't want to be. The laser can be turned on and off with the trigger finger, at will. I practice sight shooting, and from-the-hip shooting, with and without laser, always with no regard to foot position, and never firing from the same position twice in succession, all because you never can predict what conditions will be in play when you need to act to stop an attack.

    I do not hunt. So, having said all of what I've said, I "pray" that I will never have to use any of my firearms for what I have them for. The legalities are tremendous, and the emotional costs are worse. I have had to threaten deadly force on numerous occasions, and have had men at gunpoint a couple of times. In the aftermath, you are left in a state of rage, for what "that idiot" almost made you do.

    If you can't drop the hammer, don't carry the piece. "Bad guys" are very good at assessing your willingness, on the spot. A split second of indecision can mean life or death. Your best protection is your ability to think, and utilize wisdom. The piece is for backup, only.

    Be safe out there.

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
  8. Tom Brennan

    Tom Brennan AK Member

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    An army that actually expected it's officers to use modern smokeless powder pistols against an enemy (as they always expected to be outnumbered and often by unusually savage enemies at close quarters, Fuzzy-Wuzzy broke the square and all that) was the small professional British army of the late 19th-early 20th Centuries. They usually favored a slow .455 cartridge, usually using Webley revolvers. Worked against Dervishes, Pathans and Germans.

    Note that British officers bought their own pistols though and Winston Churchill used a new fangled 7.63 Mauser automatic pistol at Omdurman when the 21st Lancers crashed into a mass of Dervishes. Evidently the 7.63 was an adequate caliber for a melee against fearless fanatics armed with Remington rifles and razor sharp swords and spears.

    IMG_3856.JPG
     
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  9. MaxxVolume

    MaxxVolume AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks for sharing your words of wisdom. I like your style !
     
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  10. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Just for the sake of quibbling...(and I've been doing it a lot lately, sorry)

    Glocks are only half-cocked when a round is in the chamber. The trigger completes the cocking when you pull it. They aren't single action or double action.

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

    My only semi-auto is a 20 gauge shotgun, Weatherby SA-08. It has a Nordic tube extension. 8 in the tube, 1 in the chamber.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  11. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    The Zulus sure gave them Hell at their first encounter. Here's 15 minutes of cool, pretty close to being accurate (AFAIK).



    The Webleys show up in the second clip, when the camp is over-run.

    I can't remember what that style of rifle shooting is called...Rank and something. It's badass to watch, very effective. If they had used bandoliers with extra ammo, they would have prevailed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  12. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

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    Glocks are hammer-less. The only thing the trigger does is release the striker to go forward. The striker is pulled back by the slide, and retained by the trigger mechanism. Judge for yourself.

    Rich P
     
  13. JWinTN

    JWinTN AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    BigElCat is correct—on a Glock, pulling the trigger moves the safeties and finishes cocking the striker before releasing it.
     
  14. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

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    Hmmm. Never fully analyzed it before. Just disassembled for the purposes of said analysis. The striker is so light and free that I never noticed that the action of taking up the slack to the release point was actually drawing back the striker. Quite elegant, actually.

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
  15. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Elegant and unique to Glocks. Law Enforcement has almost universally adopted them. But not the military, most curiously.
     
  16. JWinTN

    JWinTN AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    The M&P and probably some others finish cocking the striker when the trigger is pulled. The Springfield XD, unless something has changed, does not, and is a true single action.
     
  17. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    My carry gun is a Rossi 351 (blued finish). 38+P rounds are about my limit on recoil, and I have the most experience with it.

    The 351 is an old Smith And Wesson design, the Chief's Special. It was designed with ankle carry in mind, but a dude would need some thick ankles.

    Rossi added a large Pachmayr style grip to the design. I need this because I have long fingers and mild arthritis. They added a Ruger slide safety, and the pin is not on the hammer, like the original S&W design. It's better. Fit and finish is excellent.

    It became legal for anyone to conceal carry in Kansas about 2 years ago. I've done it enough to be comfortable. The gun, other than the grip, is quite compact. I'm a skinny guy, and it doesn't show when I carry it up front, inside the pants. This allows the car seat belt to go right over it no problem.

    Where I live, not much happens, but you never know. The violence seems to be getting closer.
     
  18. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Dayum. I'll have to stop making half-cock jokes.
     
  19. BigElCat

    BigElCat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Rank and Volley...I think that's what it was called.



    Rank Volley (no 'and' to it).
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  20. MaxxVolume

    MaxxVolume AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    IMHO, Glocks tend to have a polarizing effect on many shooters.... they either fit your hand, or they DON`T. Some folks say that a Glock feels like a chunk of 2 x 4 in their hand. Thankfully, I find mine (G 19) agreeable, almost as good a fit as my Para P12 (almost identical footprint), which has a better (for me) backstrap, on which I removed some material, and installed an Ed Brown beavertail safety and rosewood grip panels.

    I`ve always been a bit partial to the G19, the fact that it only has half the parts of a typical semi-auto probably gives it unmatched reliability, but the P12, with it`s ability to send 13 rounds of .45 ACP downrange without reloading gives an undeniable sense of security....
     

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