Archery

Discussion in 'Sports & Outdoor Adventure' started by 62sunbeam, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. 62sunbeam

    62sunbeam Raconteur Subscriber

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    I bought a Samick Sage for my 11 YO daughter and she loves the sport.

    I'm debating either a recurve suitable to my size i.e. a 35-40lb 66 inch which I'm told will take longer to master but ultimately be more rewarding or a compound which I'm told will be easier to get to good at but not as satisfying as a compound with all the bells and whistles is kind of a cheater bow.

    What do you shoot with and what have your experiences been?

    Thanks

    Eric
     
  2. WhiteSE

    WhiteSE Is Lute Gluten Free?? Subscriber

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    I am planning on trying that with my 12 yo daughter....!! Skill of strength and patience...
     
  3. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    Sorry that's BS, where, who said that..lol

    If you can't anchor a bow in a consistent manner holding it to your cheek, siting the target taking your time breathing and aiming and then a consistent release to hit the target, it ain't gonna be fun.

    I love when big mussily guy's pick up a bow and they look at the draw weight, and think they can shoot a 50,60-70lb bow even a compound.

    A recurve will get progressively harder as you pull it back, and full weight will be as your trying, (TRYING) to hold it taking your time with breathing and aiming. I'd give you about five shots and then you'll start getting very sloppy and weak. Sure any bow will take conditioning of the upper body and the mussels you need for a bow. However a compound bow is kinda the opposite to a recurve, as you pull it back it gets harder and then you get over the hump. At this point the weight drops to around 20%-30% right where you need to anchor, breath and take your time aiming. You have to be able to get into a consistent, stance, holding, breathing, aiming, and release, kinda like bowling, or shooting guns.

    I haven't shot in a long time but did a lot when I was younger I diid the whole hobby. Made my own arrows, tricked out my bows, went to the range, hunted. I had one cheap Bear bow to start and that lasted about a week till I was buying TOTL Oneida bows. We didn't have eBay back then so the "Beginner" bow was a wast of money. Nobody will want a cheap bow if you decide to sell it. If I where you I'd buy a really nice bow that others would want in case you want to sell later, and you can get one used.
     
  4. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    Wow looks like Oneida has brought back the EAGLE bows.

    I had a Eagle red, white and chrome fittings bow 45lb draw weight, 3' stabilizer, something like you would see in the Olympics, flashy target bow.

    And also a Oneida Screaming Eagle, khaki green for a hunting bow.

    Oneida_2.jpg oneida-screaming-eagle-21.jpg
     
  5. 62sunbeam

    62sunbeam Raconteur Subscriber

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    So unless it falls through I'm picking up a Hoyt Ultratec on Monday.

    It's a well regarded compound bow that will satisfy my plinking needs while my daughter practices and leaves plenty of room for growth especially should I decide to hunt with it. In the meantime I'll keep my eyes open for a great deal on a vintage recurve. Just to have.

    Pix to follow.

    Thanks

    Eric
     
  6. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    I think you made a good choice going that way and yeah get a recurve latter if you want. In the mean time this will condition your body and give you time to focus on release, aiming with sites and get you in a consistent pattern. A recurve is more on feel and looking down the arrow hitting your anchor point and let it fly. But you have to learn how to anchor, how to hold the string and arrow and release it smoothly. Thats really hard to do when holding the full weight of the recurve bow.

    Does the new bow have a pin sight on it? you'll need to learn how to fit the peep sight in the string and get to a marked range and set the pin sights.

    You also should/ might want to learn how to make your own arrows. It's not that hard and cheaper than buying them built in sets. Besides you buy a nice built set of 12 and mangel a few it wrecks the set. However when you make your own you buy all the shafts and the same parts and you can just build more that match your set.
     
  7. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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  8. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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  9. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    This is just for an intro as wood, aluminum and carbon are all done a bit different. In fact I seen a few littel things there doing today that wasn't being done 25 years ago.



     
  10. 62sunbeam

    62sunbeam Raconteur Subscriber

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    It comes with a pin sight and peep installed. Obviously if the previous owner didn't have a giant head like me the peep might need to be moved. The guys at the range where my daughter shoots are well qualified to help me with this.

    I'll need to figure out what arrows shoot best with this bow before I start cutting up my carbon fiber tonearms to make arrows.:eek:

    By the way there was a Oneida Screaming Eagle on my local CL but the PO says he dismantled it to lube and tune it and we all know what happens when POs take things apart and "make them better".

    Thanks

    Eric
     
  11. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    This is good to have someone local to help you out, nothing like hands on help.

    When I got started my girlfriends father was a big time hunter, and family friend hunting buddy owned a archery store. That's how I got started, one day we went to the store, the next thing I knew I was walking out with a starter compound bow and some wood arrows he made. Then my long time friend who also hunted was buying archery equipment to hunt with as well.

    I had a long enough distance down the side of my house to shoot up to 30 yards so that helps in conditioning. We also had a archery range and club here that was really cool that you paid for. In addition to the normal range that was flat in a field with marked distances. It was located in the costal mountains and they had a walking course. Kinda like a golf course and you hiked the trail shooting many different situations, up and down hill, though trees and over reviens just like if you where out hunting.
     
  12. soundmotor

    soundmotor super modified Subscriber

    I am not an archer, but I do buy bows. Started out because I just like the way they look, they are sculptural. Every time I see a older recurve w/ aligned tips I grab it.

    In New England that can be surprisingly often. The best (so far) is a Red Wing Hunter, #45.
     
  13. 62sunbeam

    62sunbeam Raconteur Subscriber

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    So I went to the range with my daughter yesterday.

    How's this for the first batch of arrows at 25 meters:

    IMG_8075.JPG

    The sight is set up wrong so I had to compensate but I'm pretty pleased.

    Even happier to be spending time with my daughter.

    Thanks

    Eric
     
    hjames likes this.

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