Butcher Block Flexy Rack Build - Finished

Discussion in 'Listening Spaces' started by Old Guy8, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. BillWojo

    BillWojo AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    CAM00768.jpg CAM00773.jpg CAM00768.jpg CAM00773.jpg CAM00750.jpg If the shelves are all the same size than use a combination square and do a simple layout, say 1 1/2" from each edge on the corners. Use a good wood cutting drill bit and most importantly, drill the holes in a drill press. Drill oversize for ease of putting it together. At least 1/8" bigger than the all-thread.
    I picked up a few Salamander racks with cherry wood shelves from a buddy of mine for cheap. I wound up with 12 shelves and linked them together into one long unit with 4 shelves each using with a total height of 44". I purchased 48" lengths of 5/8-11 black oxide finished all-thread from McMaster Carr. They had the cheapest price around. I made steel plates to tie the front and rear rods together with black delrin pades attached so I could drag it out from the wall. They also added a bunch of stability. Excuse the mess, pics were taken as I was loading my gear back onto the shelves and I had stuff every where. I'll see if I can attach some photos.

    BillWojo
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
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  2. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Bill,
    I have no idea at this point how close shelves are to same dimentions and squareness.
    From my background, the safer way is to assure holes are square to each other and alike dimensions between. Let the outside edges vary, position to holes. That's just astetics. Not to locate each hole from its near corner. Adds too many variables, IHO.
    Size of drill? I'll see what I can find and decide on how much clearance I want. Can't make holes smaller. So either reaming passes with drill or round file and a little time should fix issues from a walking drill.

    Edit:
    Those shelves look nice. And the bases with delrin pads are nice solution.
    Old Guy
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
  3. John James

    John James "Bob's your uncle" (Stolen) Subscriber

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    I covered my all-thread with 2" PVC painted flat black. That also hid the washers.
     
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  4. BillWojo

    BillWojo AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    One other trick. You will quickly tire of running the nuts down on the all-trhread, maybe not with a short unit but the unit I built was fairly tall and there were 96 nuts and washers to deal with.
    I took one of the nuts to the auto parts store and tried various diameters of heater hose for fit. The idea is that the nut should be a snug fit inside of the hose. I had the guy cut me a 8" length (paid for 1 foot) and used it as a socket to run the nuts down the all-thread. Just insert the nut into the end of the hose, start it on the rod and roll the hose between the palm of your hands. Assembly goes much faster.

    BillWojo
     
  5. 4thChoice

    4thChoice AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Trick I used for threading nuts on long thread rods is too use a drill and a rubber band. Placed a bolt in the drill (head helps to hold rubber band) and then a rubber band around the nut and bolt and run it to the desired position. Like in this video:

    Used this trick to put this CD rack together (just a "few" nuts):

    upload_2018-1-22_11-34-13.jpeg
     
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  6. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Slick idea!
     

     

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  7. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm of two minds on how much hole clearance between 5/8"-11 threaded rod and shelves.
    1) Close fit might be more rigid. I mean almost interferance fit.
    2) Loose fit might mean rubber washers under steel washers, would be the contact between rods and shelves. Maybe better vibration isolation. But, might be less rigid.

    I have 5/8" and 3/4" forstner bits. And 3/4" short Greenlee single spur auger bit. 3/4" hole sounds too loose. 11/16" might be more difficult to find. I'm not sure how much oversize any of these are going to cut. Hand power drill or drill press might effect hole size.

    Your experience or impression of your Flexy? How much clearance does yours have?

    Maybe I'm overthinking this.

    Edit: Used 3/4" forstner.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
  8. TomBig58

    TomBig58 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Hey there OG8. I know I was saying 5/8" cuz I'm a "tight is right" kind of guy but I see where BillWojo is coming from with the larger hole. It will allow for a slightly out of square drilled hole, ease of installation, etc. and it's a shelf for chrissake not an airplane wing! Snug the nuts against the washers and it's not going anywhere. No need for rubber or anything IMO. If you feel the need smear a tiny film of clear silicone on the washer to keep it from moving around on the wood.
     
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  9. motorstereo

    motorstereo AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Give yourself some wiggle room. I've made them both ways. When it comes time to adjust and it will when you bring home a different sized piece of gear you'll be glad you're able to adjust the shelves. Chances are your floor isn't perfectly level and your walls aren't perfectly plumb so you are going to have to do some adjusting there to. If I can make a suggestion; make sure there's shelf near the very bottom. That will take out 99% of the wiggle and is more important than getting the tightest tolerance hole.
     
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  10. John James

    John James "Bob's your uncle" (Stolen) Subscriber

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    The "anti-wiggle" will come from the washers clamping the shelf, not the hole size.

    I don't remember what drill size I used but the threaded rod slipped through very easily.
     
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  11. try1256

    try1256 Super Member

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    Thought I would jump in. I used 1 3/4" maple shelves with 1" black oxide threaded rod. It was more expensive but they are solid as a rock and weigh a tone. I used high profile cap nuts for the feet.

    BAT Rig.jpg
     

     

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  12. TomBig58

    TomBig58 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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  13. try1256

    try1256 Super Member

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    Thanks Tom. Those little pads isolate great for the cost. I got mine from an HVAC supply and with shipping they were less than $1 each. Some of the high end audio web sites want as much as $25 for a set of 4 and it is the same product.
     
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  14. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I also use the blue foam rubber sandwich isolators. I bought eight 4x4 inch size on Ebay and made 32 pieces 2x2". Made presents of a few.

    Thanks to all for responses to my question about hole clearance. Motorstereo, being able to move shelves after assembly will be necessary. Will be on basement floor. And will want to be able to level each shelf. 11/16" forstner bits are available individually if I decide 3/4" is too large.

    McMaster Carr has .10" thick polyester cloth reinforced rubber washers that look interesting. They are .625" ID. They also have 5/8-11 rod black oxided in three and four foot length. That should work for me.

    Try,
    Those are awesome looking racks. If mine end up close to that I'll be happy.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
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  15. try1256

    try1256 Super Member

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    We drilled the holes just a bit larger than the rods. I have neoprene washers on each side of the shelf along with the metal washers and nuts. Once the nuts are tightened down, it is solid.
     
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  16. BillWojo

    BillWojo AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    3/4" holes will be fine, I believe that is what my shelves were drilled. Once all the nuts are snugged up it's solid as a rock. I used the rubber washers under the steel washers as I had them from the short units I pulled apart to make this unit.
    Follow motorstereo's advise and locate shelves near the bottom. Keeps the bottom "legs" from flexing.

    BillWojo
     
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  17. EmptyWallet

    EmptyWallet New Member

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    THIS is awesome! I’m debating on putting together a rack using 3/4 threaded rod or 1” threaded rod. I’d like to have 5 shelves and have it be 48 inches tall. Is that excessive? Any stability problems there? I’m thinking on the shelf dimensions being 26 inches by 26 inches.

    Not sure on the rest of it. Any comments anyone?
     
  18. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Yes, 1" rods might be excessive. Search Flexy Rack here and TNT Audio site for tips snd more ideas.
    My tip would be to research sources for all the hardware. Getting it to all match can mean a few sources. Finding feet or casters to fit large rod can be chalange and expensive. Finding 5/8-11 feet and casters is tough enough.
     
  19. EmptyWallet

    EmptyWallet New Member

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    Actually McMasterCarr has pretty much everything I need.

    I’ve read that site and the materials needed on it. Using that template:

    3/4 rod with all hardware at 4 feet - $160
    1 inch rod with all hardware at 4 feet - $260

    Just gotta source the shelves. Not sure on that. I’d like for them to be 1.5 inches thick.

    My big question here is that I’m wondering if 48 inches is too tall. Tipsy?

    I like the look of that 1 inch rod in that picture. Looks really substantial.
     
  20. Old Guy8

    Old Guy8 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Of course the pitch of the rod gets courser unless find fine pitch threads. Open end wrenches get bigger, too.
    Have not worked on mine. I have shelves from this thread. May do this spring. McMaster Carr is great source. I've used MSC also.
    Think I'm leaning to black oxided hardware.
    Have fun on project.
     

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