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Buying A Multi-Meter

Discussion in 'General Audio Discussion' started by parman, Dec 5, 2018 at 3:27 PM.

  1. kaplang

    kaplang Works for me ! Subscriber

    Get a Fluke. Well worth the price if you plan on using one a lot even if your just using it for your hobby.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018 at 8:11 PM
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  2. GChief

    GChief Not well known, super member or other silliness Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,130
    Location:
    Eastern NC
    The cases aren’t insulated on those, they are bare shinning metal
     
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  3. AdamAnt316

    AdamAnt316 Collector of heavy things Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,285
    Location:
    MA
    The AVOmeters have become some of my favo(u)rite analog multimeters ever since I discovered them; the Simpson 260 and Triplett 630 are excellent meters, but the AVOs seem to be on another level. :biggrin: Found a plethora of Avo 8s and 9s at a local surplus store, and bought a couple of them. Here's a picture of an oddball/rare AVO8 Mk4 I bought:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    (more akin to the V than the IV; must've been a retrofit of some sort)

    As far as digital multimeters go, I have several Flukes, including a couple of 23 handhelds, and both 8000A and 8050B benchtops. However, one semi-obscure meter I've been getting good use from is a Hewlett-Packard E2378A. Likely made for them by Yokogawa. the E2378A looks similar to Fluke meters, and is quite rugged. Here is a picture of my E2378A:
    [​IMG]

    As for the cheap multimeters, they're OK for basic testing, but it's not a good idea to use them anywhere where high voltage might be encountered, especially when it comes to tube equipment. Here are some classic EEVBlog videos showing what can happen when one of the cheapies encounters something it can't handle:

     
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  4. kaplang

    kaplang Works for me ! Subscriber


    Nice to know your checking my spelling. Do you want me to send you a red pencil?
     
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  5. NAD80

    NAD80 Super Member

    Messages:
    2,289
    Location:
    Carlisle PA
    Pic of a Fluke 12. Fluke12Frntw.jpg Pic of the work DMM agilent 1242a.jpg
     
  6. NAD80

    NAD80 Super Member

    Messages:
    2,289
    Location:
    Carlisle PA
    Dave nice equipment. Adam neat old style meter. The 12 is for home.
     

     

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  7. electronjohn

    electronjohn Plug it in & see!! Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,093
    Location:
    minnesota
    I have a BUNCH of meters floating around...primary one is a Tenma I bought from MCM about 25 years ago and it still soldiers on. Bought a few cheapies ($2.00 each!) from PE a few years back and they do the job...gave a couple away and kept one. There's an Archer autoranger in one of my toolboxes that's pretty handy, another toolbox has a super-cheap analog meter in it "just in case". Then there's VTVMs...an old Eico, a couple RCAs and a B&K. I guess if I see a meter I want it:)
     
  8. toxcrusadr

    toxcrusadr AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    33,208
    Location:
    Central Missouri
    I dream of a bench that has both vintage and modern stuff, the vintage mostly to look at but in working condition in case I need it.

    I have a Hickok signal generator exactly like this one, in equally perfect shape, that hopefully one day will be included.

    [​IMG]

    The paint is so thick it's almost like a porcelain coating, absolutely gorgeous close up.

    Also, I'd like to actually know how to use all my gear to actually fix stuff. :p
     
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  9. 2N697

    2N697 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    SW Missouri
    When I first started working, the “standard issue” for the company was the Beckman 3020. What made it the meter of choice at the time was it’s ability to read up to 1500 volts DC, which was needed when troubleshooting the HV cage for the CRT on many models of our equipment. These meters were hard to kill, and routinely would yield accurate readings well above their ratings.

    These days I mostly use the lower cost ones, but I have several higher quality ones for the few instances where I might be getting into high voltage. While on the subject of safety, my own experience is that the condition of the test leads is as big of a concern as the meter quality. I still prefer the manual range selection over the autoranging.

    B3020_001.JPG
     
  10. arts

    arts Super Member

    Messages:
    3,829
    Location:
    Qc, Canada
    I couldn't agree more re test leads.If you are only dealing with low voltages in low power circuits,just about anything goes. Anything more and poor quality or condition is a definite safety risk.

    I do believe that many of the modern conveniences,such as autoranging, have made us complacent and oftentimes sloppy,and I will certainly include myself in that statement,lol.I can say without doubt that I was FAR more careful and aware when I was still using unprotected analog meters. Likely one of the reasons many top-quality autorangers such as Fluke are designed to suffer silly overloads on improper range functions without damage.Or just bursting into flame:eek:
     
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