Can the L112 really take 300 watts ?

Discussion in 'The Lansing Legacy' started by qguy, Jul 24, 2018.

  1. qguy

    qguy Super Member

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    Can the L112 really take 300 watts ?

    Although I would not want to be in the same room if this happens, I am curious if manufacturers ratings are really accurate. I asked this as I have another loudspeaker rated at 200 watts, but the woofer bottomed out using a 160 wpc receiver, brand and model of said loudspeaker shall not be disclosed, it is not a JBL or a member of the Lansing family :)
     

     

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  2. spark1

    spark1 Super Member

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    There are no standards for speaker power ratings. Even when provided by the manufacturer, the ratings are often not specified as continuous vs peak. Also, it seems that when both peak and continuous ratings are provided, the difference between the two often seems questionable, given that peak power output from amp when reproducing a music signal will generally be 9-12dB greater than continuous power (which suggests that peak ratings should be much higher than the continuous rating).

    As for the JBL L112; the owner's manual does not claim the ability to handle 300 watts of continuous power. Rather, it recommends that for best performance, they be used with an amplifier with enough power to handle transients without clipping (or, more realistically, with minimal clipping), and suggests a maximum of no more than 300 watts (RMS sine wave rating)...which equals 600 watts at peak.

    To allow a reasonable amount of headroom for transient peaks in the music signal (thereby minimizing clipping distortion, as recommended by JBL), such an amp would need to be limited (via the volume control) to approximately 40-60 watts of continuous/RMS output. Effectively, this is probably not far from the L112's continuous power handling capability.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
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  3. qguy

    qguy Super Member

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    That explains all the burnt voice coil on ebay :)
     
  4. spark1

    spark1 Super Member

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    BTW; at a continuous output from the amp of 30 watts or so, in your living room and at 8-10 feet away, you'd be getting a steady output of 100dB or thereabouts, with peaks of 110dB or more (assuming the amp has the necessary power). That's painfully loud, and can damage your hearing.

    If the amp doesn't have the needed power and is heavily clipping instead, power to the tweeters will continue to rise disproportionately as the amp is pushed further into clipping, and if pushed far enough they will be damaged.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
  5. Gibsonian

    Gibsonian Super Member

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    Bottoming out a woofer is frequency and amplitude related. Watts rating is strictly power the coil can handle before burning up.

    The 300 watt rating sounds like amplifier recommendation, and one I would agree with so you don't clip within the power handling range. I like to have 1.5 to 2.0x amp size to speaker handling, relatively speaking. Then it's all about knowing your limitations, and having a bit of self control.
     
  6. Chris Brown

    Chris Brown Super Member

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    2,967
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    My JBL L150s share many things in common with the L112 (Same woofer, "same" mid, similar tweeter) and I was able to push my Yamaha M-2 (240wpc) to it's limits with them. I switched to using bridged P2201 amps (approx 700wpc) and I believe it was an improvement. I push quite a bit of power through them on a regular basis.

    As has been said, bottoming out the woofer is more a matter of frequency. Lower frequencies require more woofer excursion and at a certain point you exceed the Xmax of the woofer. It's fully possible to bottom out a woofer without exceeding the max power the voice coil can handle, and conversely, it's possible to exceed the max power the voice coil can handle without bottoming out the woofer. In some cases, such as systems using a crossover that routes very low frequencies away from the speakers and to a subwoofer instead, it can make it more practical to push the speakers closer to their power limits without worry about bottoming anything out. It, of course, also depends a lot on what content you are playing and if you are using EQ, etc.
     

     

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  7. zebra03

    zebra03 All Audio - NO BS

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    I have run my L112' solo with my Adcom GFA 5500 with no problem . It actually made me realize what great speakers they were .
     
  8. yamaha53

    yamaha53 New Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    I am currently pushing my JBL L112's with a luxman R117 with no problems. The specs say 160 watts per channel with 4.5 db headroom. So there is no telling what is going to them when I am really jamming. I was originally trying to push them with my Yamaha CR2020 but the Luxman edged out the Yammy
    in this battle. I will also agree on what great speakers they are. I would say YES

    . jblmomma.jpg
     
  9. toddalin

    toddalin Super Member

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    I will say that an L112 needs lots more watts than an L200/L300/equivelent due to the difference in sensitivity.
     
  10. seamas

    seamas Active Member

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    I have had my l112's maxed out with both a yamaha m70 and sansui g901db and no probs.tweeters will smoke if albums have a lot of ticks.if you max the low end just crossover(bx63)to an inexpensive 4645.even my l7's can't handle low(20's)frequency maxed out without being crossed over.4645 takes the place of a chair though.doesn't matter cause when its cranked up,i am standing.
     

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