CD player for Classical

Discussion in 'Digital Sources' started by duckrabbit, Apr 5, 2018.

  1. Grenadeslio

    Grenadeslio Super Member

    Messages:
    1,093
    I've found a couple of older Sony DVP's that sound pretty good, and look the part as well. Both of these players originally sold for around $1000, found both on eBay for $80. To be honest the 900V is in black, still looking for one in silver that's not $300 and residing in Russia lol. I think the 900V is a tad warmer sounding so from your criteria the 999ES might be the better choice, but really I think you can't go wrong with either.

    Sony DVP-NS999ES
    x158dvp999s-f_LD.jpeg


    Sony DVP-NS900V
    sony900v.gif
     

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  2. duckrabbit

    duckrabbit New Member

    Messages:
    10
    This is fantastic advice, I will def check those out!

    Thanks also for the CDP suggestions. I've actually had my eye on a Philips CD304 mk1 with TDA1540 which don't seem to cost that much. Good 80s looks too. But some say its not the best for classical, lacking definition. I could imagine enjoying a beefy sounding player for classical as long as it keeps enough texture and transients of the instruments.
     
  3. savatage1973

    savatage1973 Super Member

    Messages:
    4,921
    Location:
    NW Pennsylvania snow belt
    Extremely underrated and often overlooked are Kyocera units.
     
    SkyRanger likes this.
  4. bimasta

    bimasta Super Member

    Messages:
    1,988
    Good advice from xero-D-hero. The TDA1541 is legendary for its 'musicality' and excels on Classical — strings have that special 'sheen', to name just one aspect. I also play electronic music (eg Massive Attack, Portishead) and the 1541 delivers the bass with authority and the density of the soundfield with clarity. Most of the players on that list (the Dutch Classics site, I have it permanently bookmarked, and it's good reading) will suit your budget, with euros left over. Some, due to age, may need minor maintenance (a new belt, or lube the mechanism that opens the drawer) but you seem handy enough and the cost is negligible.

    There are so many, you have the luxury of choosing for looks, it that matters to you. There's also a NAD with a devoted following (CD 540 I think) — a different DAC but very smooth sound and of course a perfect match to your 3020.

    You say you don't want a separate DAC. That's how I felt, until I got an Adcom GDA-700. It was a score I couldn't resist, only $7 at a Goodwill. It was a mindblowing improvement. Normal price is ±200US. Reviews compared it favorably to the contemporary $8000 Mark Levinson DAC. It was developed at the peak of CD and represents the best of Redbook playback. I get the sense your collection is mainly CD, as is mine — the selection is so vast and the costs so low. If I move to streaming, or SACD etc, I'll need more versality, but I've never heard CDs sound better, even on 10K players. The output stage is Class A, designed by Nelson Pass, and has Class A's tonal truth and richness.

    You already have a transport so — why not?
     
    doctor fuse likes this.
  5. duckrabbit

    duckrabbit New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Good advice here, has helped me forward. But I have to say all of this is rather overwhelming. Tons of options, lots of TDA1541 CDPs, but how do they sound, how do they compare to eachother, to new CDPs in my 400 EUR budget etc. There's still a ton of googling for me to do. It seems like a great time to buy a vintage CDP though.

    I've actually been a vinyl purist for 20 years, but with a dj's approach, not so much as an audiophile. Got back into buying CDs only some months ago mainly due to my new interest in classical. As said I still prefer vinyl for most types of music.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
    doctor fuse likes this.
  6. savatage1973

    savatage1973 Super Member

    Messages:
    4,921
    Location:
    NW Pennsylvania snow belt
    Keep on Googling!!! This is a really great time to buy a "vintage" CDP, as prices are down due to streaming, rather than physical media. However, do your homework, not only on the DAC chipset, but also the laser in the drive--these players are approaching 30+ years old and the laser (reader) may be on its last legs, and some of them are "unobtanium"--you might not be able to find a replacement. A lot are still readily available, but others are not. Some are known to have really long service lives, and others are known to fail, so read the threads before you invest in a "doorstop".
     
    duckrabbit likes this.

Share This Page