CLEANING VINYL - The AK compendium of fact, fiction and collective wisdom

Discussion in 'General Audio Discussion' started by onwardjames, Dec 31, 2014.

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Have you ever used glue to clean a record?

  1. Yes

    144 vote(s)
    22.9%
  2. No

    486 vote(s)
    77.1%
  1. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    Never say never!
     
  2. D4vidG4rr3tt

    D4vidG4rr3tt AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Northern Va.
    Did a quick search on this thread, so apologies if this has been asked and answered:

    Any thoughts on cleaning the RCM tank? I had not used my Okki Nokki for several months. After cleaning several 10-inch LPs inherited from an uncle, I emptied the tank. A clot or two of gray gunk came out.

    Don't know if it was stuff that had been growing in the tank -- though I'm sure I emptied it before putting it away. Some of the records were really dirty, so it's possible this was crud from the LPs. OTOH, I've cleaned some pretty awful thrift shop finds and never noticed this kind of stuff before,

    After I finished I poured some water into the tank and let it run. But I'm wondering if I should flush it with a little bleach added to some hot water,
     
  3. dfunghi

    dfunghi AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Central Coast California
    I always have "gunk" in my US after about 20 LPs or so. Kind of like clumps of dust floating around in a grey cloud.

    After I drain the tank I simply wash with a light dawn mixture and a soft MF towel followed by a hot water rinse. Has been working well for a long time.

    Finding cloudy water and gunk tells me my US is working to remove all that from my LPs. LPs that go in after being dusted off and "looking" clean.
     
  4. dfunghi

    dfunghi AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I would think the SonicCare brushes bristles would be way, way, way too fat to reach into the grooves at all. It could help remove surface debris and I see no way it could hurt. Just avoid using any abrasive toothpaste like baking soda.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017
    fuzzywobbles likes this.
  5. D4vidG4rr3tt

    D4vidG4rr3tt AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks! One more question -- how do you use the microfiber towel? Do you run it through the tank?
     
  6. dfunghi

    dfunghi AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I simply wash the tank like I would any other bowl, roasting pan or pyrex baking dish. I do not run the tank during cleaning, I simply wash it out as if it were any other thing needing a wash.
     
    D4vidG4rr3tt likes this.
  7. analoge4ever

    analoge4ever Active Member

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Allentown, PA
    I really enjoyed reading this thread.

    There were a couple of points I think should be included:

    1. Glues, like Titebond II, must not be allowed to freeze.
    2. Although most vinyl is tough, there appears to be some variation in the formulas, after all there are a lot of records out there, so one must be careful and consider the sample size before jumping to conclusions. (Apple's vinyl appears to be an example of a non standard formula.)
    3. Tape, as in Scotch tape, can do a lot as a final cleanup without the damage more mechanical means, such as toothpicks and needles, can cause.
    4. Some HiFi systems tend to bring out all the imperfections, not just the phono cartridge, but speakers, and other components can make anything other then perfect vinyl difficult to listen to.
    5. Properly done, ultrasound cleaning is the best, but cost effectiveness is debatable for many.
    6. Water is a polar molecule and neutralizes static electricity. (I'm not sure why people use alcohol products to clean records, it makes sense on tape heads which you want to keep away from water, but I cannot understand the logic of mixing water with alcohol to clean records other then speeder drying times compared to a water rinse after a detergent wash.)
    7. A clean stylus is at least halt the battle!
     
    91r100gs likes this.
  8. miner

    miner Super Member

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    1,065
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    I recently replaced my Nitty Gritty MiniPro2 with a Audio Desk Systeme Pro. I took an inherently noisy Supertramp "Crisis..." that the NG could not fix. One standard (5 min) run through the ADS did the trick.
     
    stoutblock likes this.
  9. doctor fuse

    doctor fuse Active Member

    Messages:
    458
    Location:
    Victoria, BC, CANADA
    Fuzzy, maybe this post of mine may help you with your Spin Clean. A fairly powerful wet/dry shop vac is required.

    http://audiokarma.org/forums/index....l-cleaning-method.732114/page-2#post-10711996
     
    fuzzywobbles likes this.
  10. Mellotronix

    Mellotronix Active Member

    Messages:
    100
    I don't buy old records like you folks, but I've been collecting new vinyl since I bought my first LP, Revolver in '68. The only thing other than my hands that has ever touched my 1000+ records is distilled water, usually spread sparingly on vintage Discwashers (you know the wooden handles with the plush cushions). I've been hoarding those Discwashers--new old stock from eBay (around $50 each these days). My records are in remarkably good condition thanks to the fact that I've never used anything that's going to react chemically to the vinyl or labels or leave a nasty film. Distilled water plus elbow grease if needed, but I stay away from all other forms of cleaning solutions. And for mercy's sake, a carbon fibre brush is going to scratch those grooves! Anything that spins fast while it's cleaning is going to add static. No thanks. I am a believer in the vintage Zero Stats. Been hoarding them too. I use them on my guitars to eliminate static near the control cavities too. Newer Discwashers are crap. Anything from mid 80's on. No good.
     
  11. stoutblock

    stoutblock If it sounds good, it must be right... Subscriber

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    I also have one of these and am quite impressed! It works very well and what I really like is you can go about your business while it is running. Sometimes the records takes a slight bump with your finger to get it started to rotate and then you can walk away. When you come back the vinyl is clean and dry. I keep a micro fiber cloth handy because sometimes there are a few very small drops of water still on the surface.

    I've cleaned about 400 records now. A couple of tricks I have found. For the first run through my collection I've decided to use the maximum cycle time. Not sure the extra cycle time is needed but I see no reason not to use it? I clean the wipers with a q-tip and alcohol every 20 records or so. I remove and rinse the scrubbers about every 50 records. Replace the water and additive along with rinsing the filter every 100 albums. I also just recently blew out the dust in the fan filter for the dryer.

    Seems to be built to last a couple of lifetimes?
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2017
  12. jcamero

    jcamero If you plant ice, you're gonna harvest wind. Subscriber

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    Ok I've tried the distilled water, alcohol, drop of Dawn, concoction. Then, Scrubbing Bubbles, (the Dollar Store Brand). Now, using the Intelligent Audio 3 step system. By far the Intelligent Audio has given me the best results. The distilled water mix did not clean deep into the grooves. Scrubbing Bubbles left a residue near the label. The only negative about IA's product is it will take longer, (extra step), is worth the effort.
     
  13. luke85

    luke85 Member

    Messages:
    93
    Location:
    UK
    i use l'art du son to clean my records,then i use the spin clean filled with distilled water to rinse the records so theres no residue on them,what i noticed in my bottle of l'art du son are white bit's floating around, does that mean it has gone off ?
     
  14. jdub071

    jdub071 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    I use Titebond ll
    wood glue works like a champ! I'll be damned if I'm going to spend big bucks on record cleaning machines. There are plenty of "how tos" on Youtube. Once you get your technique down it's easy, just apply it,wait a few hours and pull it off--it takes everything out of those grooves and some look and play like they're brand new. Only side effect i've noticed is static if you're working on carpets or moving a lot building up static charges.
     
  15. Turnip

    Turnip Member

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Midlands, England
    I'm thinking baout picking up a Knosti Disco Antistat record cleaning machine since I've seen they're pretty good for the price. However one thing I saw was that the fluid which comes with it tends to leave a nasty residue on records, and I've seen people suggesting home made concoctions to combat this. However, where the hell do I buy stuff like alcohol and pure/distilled water?
     
  16. jdub071

    jdub071 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    One can pickup 91% isopropyl alcohol at just about any drug store--distilled water at any grocery store for about a buck a gallon.
     
  17. Champco

    Champco Active Member

    Messages:
    198
    Keeping it simple and I am cheap. I take my garage sale finds and if they look at all dirty or have marks across the grooves i just take them to the kitchen.
    I have a tray with a shamwow in the bottom of it .A very warm water lightly soaped with dawn in the sink. A light microfiber cloth to wash the crud from the grooves. A quick rinse with osmosis water and a fast dry with microfiber cloths. Maybe two minutes time each. Then On the turntable, D4+ on the diskwasher to rid the static pop's.
    I have had great success with what looked like hopeless cleanings.come out just great. I monitor the stylus tip for debris and it does not need cleaning.
    I have been playing Vinyl since as a 4th grader in 1962.flipping 45's of Elvis.
    I never once considered soapy water always thinking the labels would get damaged but so far, if they get wet and are dried immediately there is no problem.
    I am going to go over every thing I own as needed.
     
  18. Legrace

    Legrace New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Simple tip for RCM owners - double check your vacuum wands. On my machine the slot for liquid removal extends all the way out to the down spout. So the first half inch or so never comes into contact with the record surface. In turn reducing vacuum due to bypass air leakage. To seal the open slot space I applied several wraps of electrical tape. Noticed an immediate increase in pulling power. For best cleaning results the higher the vacuum the better.
     

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