Dim Bulb Tester Build and How-To

Discussion in 'DIY' started by EngineerNate, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. awillia6

    awillia6 Well-Known Member

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    621
    More like "For sure smart and careful."
     
  2. Binkman

    Binkman Addicted Member

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    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Mine looks very similar but I suppose your extended design is "safer" for testing grounded instruments. Only seen two audio units service manuals, (pre's that had a ground and that was for studio use.) with ground lugs. but any transistor type 120vac device with a power supply can be tested.
    btw.... I have an old pink bulb 100w.. ya know the kind that were very sturdy glass. Pink actually shows up pretty good then dims off like 'okay' in dark pink. :D
     
  3. Ray Gianelli

    Ray Gianelli AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Lake Worth, FL
    I used one for years that was just a real quick and dirty "need this now" affair. Took an extension cord, cut one side of it and placed a ceramic lamp socket in series with the cut side. Only within the past week did I finally mount it on a piece of wood.
     
  4. No Money

    No Money AK Subscriber Subscriber

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  5. EngineerNate

    EngineerNate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    So fancy!
     
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  6. No Money

    No Money AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I might actually knock up something similar, having three different bulbs and a selector seems smart. Or overkill. Who knows.
     
  7. vaathi

    vaathi baski Subscriber

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    912
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Good work @EngineerNate. I used a double pole switch to disconnect both the lines. Also grounded the metal box.
     
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  8. EngineerNate

    EngineerNate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks! I purposefully used the plastic box to avoid having to worry about grounding the exterior. I had actually picked up a metal box in HD with the thought, "This would be more sturdy!" then put it back because I didn't want to have to deal with grounding it.

    Is there any need to break the neutral line connection? Without the hot connected it's potential should be zero unless there's something wrong with the house wiring.
     
  9. vaathi

    vaathi baski Subscriber

    Messages:
    912
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA
    I was safe then sorry to disconnect both the lines based on DBT design I read somewhere. It was not grounded. I used a very sturdy three proged chord which we use in our commercial heavy duty routers. I had bunch of them I got from work ( They were throwing them away in trash since the routers were connected to networked powerswitch using specialized electrical cables.). So I grounded it. I have bunch of bulbs and swap as necessary.
     
  10. EngineerNate

    EngineerNate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    "Better safe than sorry" is rarely a bad call with this type of thing. :)

    I've made my own heavy duty extension cords out of stranded 12 gauge outdoor rated wire from Lowes/HD before. They turn out quite nice and are extremely flexible and beefy, but the last one I did ended up costing something like $30 once I bought all the parts. I had a bit of buyer's remorse with that one, but it does look sa-weet now that it's in place.
     
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