Does anyone listen to modern music on vintage speakers?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by MOEB74, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. MOEB74

    MOEB74 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Darn.. lol Well so far so good! Anyone wanna pop that cherry?
     
  2. botrytis

    botrytis Trying not to be a Small Speaker Hoarder Subscriber

    [​IMG]
    Here ya go :D
     
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  3. MOEB74

    MOEB74 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    welp there that goes...
     
  4. hertzdonut

    hertzdonut Press Play and Stand Back Subscriber

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    vintage-not.jpg
     
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  5. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    Well if the speaker is "Al Jolson Old" then it's not the bass that's going to hurt it, it's the nearly 100 years, actually over 100 years (Jolson's first record was in 1911) that would be the issue. Of course, if it's been playing music since 1911, then it's a horn not a speaker. What I think you're referring to is the "dynamic speaker" so if you really want to know what modern music will do to an old speaker, find a Magnavox from the 20's and see what happens. :)
     
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  6. MOEB74

    MOEB74 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    haha I should've been more specific. I meant just a type of music played say when the KLH Fives came out in late 60s. If that speaker only played big band or Al Jolson for most of its life... But yeah I got your drift.
     
  7. Chris Brown

    Chris Brown AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Below is an example of how the 12" woofers on my JBL L150 speakers (1979) handle modern bass-heavy music; playing the Qemists Mix of BYOB - My Best Shoes.



    The older 12" woofers can handle quite a bit of bass as you can see. It is possible to push them too hard, which I have done on multiple occasions. What happens at that point is the voice coil will hit the pole piece in the rear and the woofer will produce a heart-stopping "POP!"

    Below is a video of the 8" woofer in my JBL L5 speakers (1993) playing the same song. These woofers are able to do great for only being 8". They are ultimately limited by their suspension before anything else, but are still able to produce very good bass.



    I'm not sure about tearing, but I have had some issues with the spider in my 2214H woofers in my JBL L100T speakers (1984). I found the spider lifting up off the frame last time I refoamed them. I hate to think what might have happened if I had not caught it then, and only realized it once a failure occured. Whether this is normal wear and tear, or due to my tendency to play bass-heavy music at loud volumes, I am not sure.

    In the picture you can see right under the wires where the spider had begun to lift up. Glue fixed it thankfully and it has not given me any issues since.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    Well, you piqued my curiosity on your curiosity...and just had to do a follow up, and it was interesting what I found..

    From what I can gather, the very first (1878) Thomas Edison cylinder recording was of an opening by a a cornet playing (23 secs) followed by two spoken nursery poems, "Mary Had A Little Lamb" and "Old mother Hubbard" The total time of the recording was 78 seconds with a man making the first bloopers wherein he laughed twice in the music..once during and at the end of this reproduction of sound. The event took place in St. Louis on a tin foil covered roll.

    The history of the dev of the 78's is a bit more muddled. Seems like a German fellow, by the name of Berliner, offered the first disc (1901) which were on the onset 5" in diameter, which grew in size as they improved in the different formats. The first were made of a shellac resin and were very brittle and a difficult to handle. The vinyl came later. In the beginning, a singer had to sing into a horn, which transmitted the vibrations by air into a needle-like stylus which recorded the sounds on grooves. The first stage was known as the mechanical stage, which was followed by the much improved electrical stage.

    Wasn't able to track what song was one of the first recorded, but by the late 1880's, the 78 records (Berliners) were able to carry twice the amount of material that the earlier Edison cylinders were able to store.

    It does make for interesting reading if you are into the history of music and how it became recorded. I've only scratched the surface here (pun unintended).

    Q
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017 at 11:33 AM
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  9. darkblue94

    darkblue94 It wasn't me. Subscriber

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    I think that you should check your dates listed and verify. There were no 78 records in the late 1880's and the first Thomas Edison cylinder recording took place long before 1978. :D
     
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  10. MOEB74

    MOEB74 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks... Sounds like you were cranking that music! I typically dont listen to it that loud, never over 3/5 volume on the Sa-400 I have. Its only 40WPC so its not much, and the inefficiency of the speakers calculated into it.
     
  11. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    Gotcha on the 1978:confused:...made the change accordingly...thanks!

    And per the "Berliners"...just going on what I read. Could be wrong? But check it out, eh?

    Q
     
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  12. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    It's the coolest thing ever to listen to cylinders. You can sometimes even hear the band speeding up to make sure they finish the song within the allotted time! Unlike vinyl LP records and I guess later 78s (I'm not sure when recording and editing was possible) every performance is a "live" performance. Some of the best experiences I've had listening to music have come from really old recordings due to the connection that's felt. By me anyway. :)
     
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  13. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    Well, I listen to EDM and Trap Music through my NS690ii speakers. They don't seem to mind and it sounds pretty darn good. Of course you can't compare them to the BP 2002 speakers sporting two massive subwoofers (literally shook a light out of the ceiling a few years ago) but the music sounds fine through them. I'm not sure but I think the 690 ii are from the late 70s... can someone correct me?
     
  14. Tia

    Tia AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Buckethead on a MC2105 thru a pair of Cornwalls from '78. Thump, crash and yes, will irritate the neighbors.
     
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  15. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    Cool!:thumbsup:

    Q
     
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  16. crazy-in-az

    crazy-in-az "Dinsdale!" Subscriber

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    I've listened to Volbeat on my Marantz Imperial 6's at pretty high volume with no problems whatsoever. However, I have a feeling it would sound better on my Cerwin Vega D9's once they get refoamed...

    As long as you use your ears and brain and pay attention to warning signs (such as distortion, woofer bottoming out, etc) you should have no problem using old speakers for new music.
     
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  17. Bodyblue

    Bodyblue AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    My Imperial 6s floor me every time I turn them up. I had no idea when I got them they would be able to produce so much bass.
     
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  18. slimecity

    slimecity Super Member

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    Hells yea - if a vintage speaker was "revealing" when it first came out - it will probably still be the case today.

    I listen to EDM, metal, heaps of stuff on my 104.2's. Marilyn Mansons' The Pale Emperor sounds huge - and these speakers still show deficiencies in a sub-par recording, where these exist.
     
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  19. zebra03

    zebra03 All Audio - NO BS

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    I remember when CD's first came upon the scene . All of a sudden , manufacturer's were touting equipment as "digital" ready .
     
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  20. HarmanKardon

    HarmanKardon Tubes still smell funny Subscriber

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    These comments nail it.
     
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