Easier cheaper parts available vintage receiver brands to look at?

Discussion in 'Equipment Reviews & Opinions' started by Marksj, Dec 25, 2018.

  1. Marksj

    Marksj AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    South of Quad Cities in Illinois
    Starting to get the bug! I had a yamaha 45 years ago. Not sure of the model number now. Seems like it was unrepairable or not cost effective to repair 20 years ago. Had kids and bills to pay but here I
    am. Not trying to start a model war but looking for suggestions.
     

     

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  2. mhardy6647

    mhardy6647 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    45 years ago was a little before Yamaha's prime. There were a few models exported, but the Yamaha of renown (at least in the US) appeared ca. 1976 (which is about 42-43 years ago, although my arithmetic is always a bit suspect).

    I am a little nonlinear when it comes to Yamaha hardware from that era, so I'm not going to be able to help you much. ;)

    [​IMG]DSC_0241 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
     
  3. Marksj

    Marksj AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    South of Quad Cities in Illinois
    Any models of that era that are cheaper, easier to get parts for if needed. Looking at Marantz, Kenwood any others worth looking into?
     
  4. mhardy6647

    mhardy6647 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    53,393
    Not Marantz. Very pricey, high demand -- and (to my ears and taste) mediocre sonics. I am referring to the 1970s Superscope-era Marantz-branded equipment, not the excellent vacuum tube electronics produced when it was still Saul Marantz's company.

    Kenwood might be worth serious consideration. For whatever reason, they seem to have been relegated to a lower tier from the perspective of 21st Century retro-collectors. I'd consider Kenwood at par with Pioneer. Again, mediocre, massmarket gear (from my perspective), but probably cheaper, too, in general.

    I think the Yamaha stuff of that era still sounds pretty good. Not that there's not better to be found, but for its time it was - again IMO - much better than average massmarket Japanese equipment (which is why I still have the amp I bought in 1978, and have acquired... umm... a few more pieces besides in the ensuing 40-ish years).

    [​IMG]DSC_0576 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
    (Pioneer on the left, Yamaha on the right)
     
  5. rcs16

    rcs16 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Baldwin, Ontario, Canada
    Easier cheaper parts available vintage receiver brands to look at?
    Doesn't exist, since the parts that wear out, like pots, switches are long obsolete. All you can do is salvage from what you can get, like spares, to extend life.
     
  6. Bugetnirvana

    Bugetnirvana Member

    Messages:
    76
    My favorite "cheaper" vintage gear is Realistic. Phenomenal sound per $ ratio. I like Kenny's too. But really I would just start by seeing what you have available locally. Check adds and local Goodwill stores and such. The best buy on vintage audio gear is the one that everyone else missed. And there is always the potential for some Sony, Technics, Akai or some odd diamond in the rough. Personally I would rather listen to them then fix them, so I typically look for stuff in VG condition and roll the dice. But that's just me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019

     

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  7. Rapscallion

    Rapscallion New Member

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    Find one that’s currently working, plug it into a power strip, and use that to control the on-off. The power switch is the leading contender for problems in a vintage receiver.

    My recommendation fir a great budget receiver? A harman kardon 330, 430, 630, 730, or 930 series. Great sound, well built, almost always under priced, especially the 330 models.
     
  8. Spe@kerBox

    Spe@kerBox New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    I have a 330A that I restored (nostalgia from my younger days caused me to reacquire one). The sound is really good. The 330B (later units with an 'A' at the end of the SN) are even better as the heat sinking is much improved and the sonic signature just as good. Definitely a good, inexpensive receiver if you don't need too much power (20WPC).
     
  9. Marksj

    Marksj AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    South of Quad Cities in Illinois
    I forgot all about this thread. I found a Marantz 2245 near me that I was able to audition before I purchased. I made a deal on it and I am glad i did. Thanks for the replys and sorry I didn't get back to say I had purchased a receiver.
     
  10. Rapscallion

    Rapscallion New Member

    Messages:
    46
    That’s a nice choice. Good sound and pretty to look at!
     

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