Favorite Programming Languages

Discussion in 'AK Polls' started by loopstick, Nov 23, 2017.

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What Are Your Favorite Programming Languages?

  1. Java

    3 vote(s)
    15.8%
  2. C

    7 vote(s)
    36.8%
  3. C++

    3 vote(s)
    15.8%
  4. Python

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  5. C#

    4 vote(s)
    21.1%
  6. JavaScript

    2 vote(s)
    10.5%
  7. Visual Basic .NET

    3 vote(s)
    15.8%
  8. PHP

    2 vote(s)
    10.5%
  9. Delphi / Object Pascal

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  10. Assembly Language

    5 vote(s)
    26.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

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    I now know enough to be a troll in this thread. Ain't gonna do it...got to restrain myself...SOMEBODY STOP ME!

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
  2. DeeCee

    DeeCee Super Member

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    I learned Lisp in a class - not my cup of tea... I programmed a little APL on a dedicated IBM PC in high school; yep a weird language. Never did ADA but reviewed it in ACM material. It seemed a little too “large” for me.

    Did quite a bit of Perl at one point; another large language but you can pick an choose what to use in it. It’s greatest advantage is also its disadvantage (flexibility).

    Weirdest language I used was Forth.
     
  3. hemathoma

    hemathoma New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Im new here, and a proud owner of a teac a2300 anyways, back on point, i remember learning basic on my own. got into trouble in highschool, programming the scientific calculators to say rather bad things lol. it was easy to do.
    Aaron
     
  4. stratosfear

    stratosfear New Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Kansas City, MO area
    Troutman's Sixth Programming Postulate: Profanity is the one language all programmers know best.

    I really enjoyed QuickBasic and wrote programs my employer's software department thought a Basic language couldn't do.
     
  5. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    it's not so much the languages of the past that concerns me, it's the massive proliferation
    of new languages. since "the good old days" there's now C#, Objective-C, Swift, F#, and the
    scripts: powershell, java, VBA, and the "shell" style python, Perl, PHP, smalltalk, turtle, ruby,
    and SQL, R, and hundreds other.

    then there's there 5 million apps running on just the phones. wait for the inevitable
    no-going-back hardware architecture changes coming.

    I see chaos, running iOS/Android on a VM on a phone with inter-VM switching to allow incompatible
    and never-updated 2017 and 2019 apps to run on the same phone. then there will be the byte-stream
    machine code interpretation to allow old to run on older to run on ancient platforms.

    then there's lets put AI on the phone (Huawei) or VR or 13 channel sound with MQA and software
    as a service to do 64/384 in software.

    there's still only about 19million professional programmers that are currently engaged in big-scale projects.

    in about 5 years. meanwhile I'm waiting for Apple to consolidate their platforms and give me the touchscreen
    of the pods, pads, and phones onto the Mac. I've used them since 68K days, suffered with PowerPCs, now
    intels, and I see a 32-core 16Ghz ARM-variation to emulate current OSX/Intel code on iOS for Mac.

    be prepared, major bux to be made for converting existing code to new platforms, and with interpreted code
    that is reverse-engineerable, the smarter guys will make a killing.
     
  6. loopstick

    loopstick AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm going to allow a little bit of trolling just to see where it takes us. :D
     
  7. kvining

    kvining Member

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    I'm a state government employee, VB.net is the weapon of choice, but most of the day to day work is T-SQL, we government workers are naturally lazy people.
     
  8. Omegaman

    Omegaman Ultra Super Member Subscriber

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    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Assembly language is the most honest language

    I was programming 10 years before windows or the internet came out

    Now I program embedded C and C++

    None of that OOP crap
     
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  9. loopstick

    loopstick AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I actually programmed in machine language. Once. In school. Then there was a four bit "microprocessor" we made in a lab on breadboards with tons of TTL chips and spaghetti wire wrap. Sixteen instructions and not a lot of "memory". The "display" was a pair of seven segment LED numbers. When I set up this poll I was reluctant to include Assembly cuz I thought nobody does it except hard core video compression guys, etc. I'm glad I kept it in.
     
    DeeCee likes this.
  10. Markoneswift

    Markoneswift Quartz locked n ready to rock Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Aotearoa New Zealand
    I used to commute by train a lot and my company used those little Psion Organiser things ( remember those anyone ? ). I had a spare one and a manual, so I taught myself programming on it using the two line LCD display. It used a version of BASIC (OPL I think it was) and with that I created text based games like Hangman.

    I found it fascinating working through the logic of a simple game like Hangman - storing previously guessed letters, generating a random word from a dictionary file, scanning that word for multiple occurances of the same letter and so on.

    I did some Dataflex years ago and COBOL and then went on to do some Progress which was one of the first OO 4G languages. I left that behind and went down the technical / networking route instead but to this day I wish I had kept on with the programming......
     
  11. DeeCee

    DeeCee Super Member

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    Location:
    Orlando, FL, USA
    Never got that deep into the OOP stuff; I evolved (devolved?) into doing pretty specialized technical support database work (Oracle) and later business analytic stuff for a short time (large database stuff like cubes and data warehouse stuff.

    I miss good, ol' C and assembler programming, period.
     
  12. Omegaman

    Omegaman Ultra Super Member Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,831
    Location:
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    I wrote the Real Time Interrupt-driven multi-tasking Operating System in Assembly Language for the Motorola 6800, 6809 and 6811 microprocessors

    At first I used a EPROM debugger (I wrote) and a 4 inch thick greenbar printout to debug programs
    Those were the days of 3 hour over the phone debug sessions

    Then I graduated to Lauterbach In-Circuit Emulators that allowed me to have complete control over the whole system

    Hard drives, Printers, Serial ports, paged memory, KSR (Keyboard Send Receive) TTY monitors, Relays, parallel bit I/O, Analog to digital and Digital to Analog conversions

    Using an 8 bit microprocessor

    All in Assembly

    The company I worked for Made their own control computers for Gasoline tank farms. Where those big fuel trucks load up. We did the card access system, load monitoring and emergency control

    The operating system would check 10 times a second for shutdown conditions and shut down in 1/10th second. The fuel flowed at 600 gallons a minute so it would spill 10 gallons before shutting down

    If there was a power fail the system have to recover and not lose any of the loads in progress

    Plus it monitored the temperature each 10 gallons and calculated the expansion coefficient for temperature adjusted fuel load



    The company was almost EXACTLY like the company in OFFICE SPACE the movie. That was just like what it was in the 80's

    gone now

    that was fun
     
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  13. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

    Messages:
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    I had the ability to do C++ for embedded, and I do like the additional capabilities and language extensions, but the embedded stuff I wrote for was memory limited, and there tends to be a bit more overhead for C++ (memory management, etc.). The compilers I used for embedded C resulted in such nicely optimized code that I could not justify the time it would take to stick with assembly only.

    I very much like and utilize the OOP capabilities of C++, when memory is not an issue. C++ Builder provided a lot of Pascal and C++ objects ready to plug in, and I really enjoyed generating multi-threaded apps with ease. Code reuse with an OOP language, via user created libraries and linked in modules is a real step up in efficiency. C++ Builder has changed hands a couple of times since my last project, so I don't know if it has improved, decayed, or remained on par.

    I've used Visual Basic, and was able to do what I wanted, but, like most things MS produces, it abstracts the programmer from the innards a bit too much. It is good for what it does though.

    I started with Fortran on punch cards, and my last project was an ARM-7 based project, with PC-based engineering tools (for lab and field). It sure was a relief when flash came into vogue. Erasing and programming EPROMS was a pain. I still can do it by the way. I also still have a nice DEC PDP-1103 and an IMSAI 8080 with paper tape capability, and a Heath-Zenith H-89, and a wide carriage daisy wheel printer (and boxes of green bar to go with).

    There is more in my lab, but that is enough from me. I do likes me some programming...

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
    DeeCee, loopstick and Omegaman like this.
  14. Ditto, circa 1985 or so (age 12 via a TRS-80...) just to see if I could. By the time I finished entering a few hundred lines of code, straining my eyes (and tolerance) debugging it, and finally got it to half-ass compile and run correctly, I threw up my hands, cursed the programming gods, and never looked in the direction of code again until a couple of decades or so later where I circumstantially had to pass a class in COBOL so as to obtain my CIS degree. It's amazing the havoc a misplaced/erroneously typed "." or "/" can create...:mad: How some of you guys and gals do this for a living, much less a hobby, never fails to amaze me. For some mysterious reason, Python keeps whispering in my ear to pick up a book and give it a shot. It just something about objects, class inheritance, and polymorphism that keeps me backing away from the keyboard.
     
  15. DeeCee

    DeeCee Super Member

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    Location:
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    Ha! Can’t blame you for that last sentence.
     
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  16. loopstick

    loopstick AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I just added a grudging vote for Python. My only involvement up until recently was to write library stuff in C (.so, .dll) that some sluggish section of a python utility "imported" for speed. As a language it seems arbitrary and capricious and cobbled together, with silly terminology like "tuple" and "dict" (who's gonna wanna say "dict" at the workplace?). IMHO memory management IS programming. OTOH it's taken over from Matlab and IDL the "science" market and there's a ton of stuff out there already written. I'm starting to like it for what it is.
     
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  17. Chip Chester

    Chip Chester Super Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Central Ohio
    Fortran via Teletype/300 baud to WPAFB from the high school. Then various Basic on original IBM PCs and RS TRS 80s, mostly for data base and radio dub label printing. I liked Fortran. Dang.

    Chip
     
  18. sqlsavior

    sqlsavior AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Española NM
  19. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Super Mod Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    These days, SQL should be in there. My stuff frequently wrapped SQL into C++ and Pascal database objects. The objects handled the lower level SQL activities, abstracting the PC app programmer from the lower level details. For example, elevators come in many many flavors, depending upon selected variables. My apps took the variables, and performed SQL activities (mostly queries), and automatically generated system schematics, assembly drawings, parts lists, and system configuration default settings, based upon sales application output.

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
  20. All with a whopping 16 KB of internal RAM accompanied by a cartidge slot for additional programs... Here's the model I received for Christmas in '85:

    TRS-80_Color_Computer_2.jpg
    Image per wikipedia.org

    I spent hours upon hours having fun with BASIC on this bad boy...
     

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