Fisher Promenade II Console

Discussion in 'Fisher' started by Hifiler, May 22, 2018.

  1. Hifiler

    Hifiler AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Iowa City
    Picked up another Fisher console over the weekend, via a semi-local online auction (which surprisingly I got for the opening bid).

    Here are some photos for those interested. It is obviously the 1960 Promenade II, and I really love its design.

    It is in pretty decent condition overall, although the Garrard RC 121 Mk II is filthy, and the console legs do not appear to be original (they look longer than I see in other examples). The insides of the amp and preamp are very clean.

    Could somebody please recommend a person or place that I could send the amp and pre-amp to get them restored and running again? Although I eventually want to learn to do this myself (and these do appear to be relatively simple circuits), I'd like to get this console running and hear it soon! I plan to only use the Aux input for the time being.

    Thank you to everybody


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  2. Hifiler

    Hifiler AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Iowa City
  3. gadget73

    gadget73 junk junkie Subscriber

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    Thats a cute console. I like it. Don't know what this one would have come with, but an RC-121 may be proper. Its right for the era anyway, but possibly it came with an RC-120 (same but no removable headshell) or an RC-210, which is again very similar but the paint, control levers, and the tonearm are a little different. Virtually the same mechanism though.
     
  4. larryderouin

    larryderouin Turn it UP, POP? PLLUUEEEZZZZZEE Subscriber

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    Agree with Gadget the RC-121 would have been appropriate for the day. And it's a decent changer when rehabbed. The 1958 Promenade Service Manual also covers the 1959 Promenade. (Same Chassis, slightly different top covers. The '58 left the controls exposed, while the '59 covered them up with the top. Otherwise they are identical. Looking at the manual, this thing is light on replaceable caps, 4-5 in the preamp, and 5-6 in the amp including separates for the can cap. Less than $20.00 in parts for a recap, but if resistors need replacement add another $15.00-$20.00max to cover parts costs. The preamp comes apart to access parts inside, so 1-2 hours for recap, maybe an additional hour or 2 for resistors if any are bad. The amp is very straight forward. Push pull 6BM8's putting out about 5-8wpc rms. Very few caps here, but resistors also may need attention. Figure about 2-3hours.

    If you sent it to a shop it would go about $300-400 on the East coast. 50% more on West Coast. In Iowa, probably less by 10-15%.

    Unfortunately I don't know of any shops in the midwest other than Many Moons Audio in Tulsa. He may work on it. He does very good work on Solid State stuff but not sure about whether he'd take on the tube stuff. www.manymoonsaudio.com/
    If he doesn't, he may know someone who does.
     
  5. Hifiler

    Hifiler AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Iowa City
    Larry thank you very much for the useful information!

    And sincere apologies for the obscenely late reply, I have been completely away from hi-fi and posting for a variety of reasons (not all good).

    Based on the part count in this console, and what looks to be relatively decent access to the circuits, this unit appears to be as good as any for me to finally restore myself.

    Thank you again
    dave
     
  6. larryderouin

    larryderouin Turn it UP, POP? PLLUUEEEZZZZZEE Subscriber

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    No problems. Life Happens. Just keep us updated on progress.
     

     

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  7. audmod01

    audmod01 Super Member

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    The changer has the removable cartridge shell, which makes changing the cartridge or the stylus very easy to do. If you only change the stylus there is not likely to be a need to change tracking force. If the cartridge is to be changed too, then you may need a stylus force gauge to know what force is actually being applied at the stylus tip. Garrard made several stylus force gauges over the years and the older ones are the types to use with this changer. A gauge should be able to measure from 1-8 or 10 grams. The older changers are not designed to use cartridges with really low tracking force stylus assemblies (less than 2 grams). Since this unit has a preamp, it likely has a magnetic type cartridge.

    Joe
     
  8. Hifiler

    Hifiler AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Thanks Joe. Yes the head shell came off easily, and has a stereo Sonotone cart. Most likely ceramic as stereo MMs weren't very common in 1960?

    So I'm wondering whether the phono input on the preamp will work straight with a modern MM, probably not

    dave
     
  9. gadget73

    gadget73 junk junkie Subscriber

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    It won't. And you're likely right on the ceramic, there don't appear to be enough tubes to have a mag phono stage. I'd expect two more if it used the usual Fisher phono circuit. Mag carts were fairly common but it was a higher end thing at that point.

    A small MM preamp between the changer and the stock preamp will make it work though. I've done that with consoles, the one I have uses an inexpensive Radio Shack preamp that simply plugs into a switched outlet inside the console.
     
  10. audmod01

    audmod01 Super Member

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    Gadget;
    Yes, Sonotone was a big name in the new ceramic element cartridges which turned out to have much longer life than the older Rochelle salts types that were popular in the 1930s and 1940s.
    If a magnetic cartridge preamp is desired, Fisher made several that would serve well and keep it all Fisher.
    Joe
     

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