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Help Me Get Started...I Need Everything

Discussion in 'Cameras and Photography' started by Killer Fox, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

    Messages:
    1,663
    I'm getting back into photography soon after years of not owning a "real camera" (last 35mm was film). I never really learned the basics and will be taking a beginner course soon as well. I've been using a Panny Lumix Superzoom which was the best P&S on the market in my opinion when I bought it. I'm into nature and landscapes mostly.

    I don't have a huge budget so I'm looking for value. I'm looking for body and lens recommendations. I've been looking at Canon as that seems to be the most bang for the buck. Specifically the Canon 80D.

    I'm into nature/wildlife and landscape mostly.

    Any tips are appreciated!
     

     

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  2. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    1,663
    Ok will add some info so hopefully get some replies.

    I'm looking at a Canon 80D with these lenses:

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens

    Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 Image Stabilization STM Lens

    Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro Telephoto Zoom Lens
     
  3. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    I'm a Nikon guy but boy that 80D is a nice body. Wow!

    Here is how I think about DSLR's

    First is your primary usage. You are into landscape and nature photography so weight and portability are very important.

    Is there a lighter option that has the features you need? The 80D weighs 1.6 pounds body only. Add a prime and you are at 2 lbs. Add the Sigma and you are at 3 lbs. Canon may have a body with the same resolution but fewer features that is lighter - check it out.

    Ask yourself, will you really want to carry all that kit through a field or up a mountain?

    Lenses - since this is an apc (crop) camera you multiply the focal length of the lens by 1.5x to get the 35mm size lens you are used to.

    So your 50mm lens is really a 75mm.

    You probably want a 50mm equivalent prime, so that's going to be a 35mm lens. You may want to consider a 28mm prime for a little wider fov. Or even a very high quality 20mm. With all that resolution you can easily digitally zoom 4x with great quality.

    The 18 to 55 is a good choice. Very versatile.

    The Sigma 70-300 is really a 105mm to 450mm in 35mm equivalent terms. It is not image stabilized, so you will need a tripod for sure, adding another 3 lbs.

    This camera has super resolution. 24 mp. The Sigma won't come close to your camera's resolution.

    The prime will give you amazing results.

    If you haven't already guessed, weight is a big deal for me, as the camera I use is the one I want to carry. I try and get the weight way down for the body and a prime - in my case a 35mm. This makes for a package I can carry wherever I go, all day long, without getting tired.

    Anyway, you are getting in at a great time - the picture quality of the latest dslrs is amazing.

    Hope all this helps. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Tom
     
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  4. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    Location:
    Greensboro NC
    Well I don't know much about Canon. I picked up a Nikon D5500 last year and love it.

    Are you thinking birds or other fast and small creatures as part of your nature/wildlife interests? I ask because Nikon's new(ish) AF-P lenses really are game changers in the focus speed department. I have the DX 70-300 and it focuses as fast or faster than the professional lenses. And for landscapes the AF-P 10-20 mm is great. I assume the 80D is a crop sensor camera? You are probably going to want something wider than the 18mm kit lens.
     
  5. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

    Messages:
    1,663
    Great info guys! Thanks!

    The 80D I want to buy is bundled with a Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 Image Stabilization STM Lens.

    Perhaps I should buy that first and buy additional lenses later?

    I'm a little confused now on the lens math now due to it being a crop sensor.

    Weight could be an issue for me as a hiker but budget comes first. This camera was the best I could find for under $1,000 (refurb with the lens).

    We have a big trip to Italy coming up in June and I want to be ready so I need to get something now.
     
  6. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    Location:
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    The 18-55 is the equivalent to the old 35mm standby of 28-80mm.

    Personally I would drop down to a cheaper body and use the money on more lenses. It's going to be lighter, and I doubt you will notice any difference in picture quality, other than in certain circumstances.

    I highly recommend an ultrawide lens. I hardly use my kit lens since I got the 10-20mm.
     
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  7. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    What about crop sensor vs. full frame?
     
  8. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    Sorry about the lens math confusion. Try this

    Crop sensor x 1.5 = 35mm full frame equivalent
    Crop = 35mm equivalent
    20mm = 30mm
    28mm = 42mm
    35mm = 52mm
    50mm = 75mm

    Certainly get the kit lens 18-55mm is a very usable lens. Mild wide to mild tele.
    This would be 27mm to 82 mm range in a 35mm full frame camera.

    Weight is critical for me as a hiker/backpacker and these cameras are generally much heavier than the 35 mm film cameras you are used to. I would at least look for a lighter weight option in the Canon range. For example my Nikon D3200 is much lighter and less expensive than the D7000 I also have. The D3200 gets used the most.

    As mhedges noted for landscapes wider is better so getting a short focal length prime or 10-20mm zoom is a great option.

    Tom
     
  9. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    This is a "cheaper body". It's a factory refurb for under $900. That includes the lens.
     
  10. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    Full frame is way heavier with minimal performance difference except at the lowest light levels.
     
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  11. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    It's a midlevel "prosumer" body. If you wanted to save cost and weight you could drop down to a T6i or T7i. I'm not sure what features you would lose.

    Do you have a Target near you? Most have the lower end Canon and Nikon DSLR's on display. You could handle them a bit and get some idea of what fits better in your hands, how the kit lenses feel, etc.
     

     

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  12. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    Great idea. You really have to feel these in your hand to get an idea of how they will work for you.
     
  13. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    The camera I use the most is a Nikon D3200 with a 35mm f1.8 lens. It weighs 1 lb 10 oz with memory card, lens cap, and battery. It goes everywhere with me because it is so small and light. The body was $350 and the lens $180. There must be an equivalent in the canon lineup. IMG_1619.JPG
     
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  14. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    OK so is you were going to go ahead and buy this camera (it keeps ticking my boxes, so to speak) what lenses would you buy for it and why?

    The reviews on it are great as well. People are praising this camera left and right!

    Thanks again for the help BTW. Much appreciated!!
     
  15. illinoisteve

    illinoisteve Super Member

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    So by "real" you don't mean a film camera?

    Well if you decide to consider both film and digital together, many Pentax dslrs can easily share a gigantic number of film era lenses using the m42 and K mounts, as well as currently and recently made lenses for digital use only. So, if you had both a Pentax dslr and Pentax (or Pentax compatible) film slr, they could share many of the same lenses. The Pentax Forums website is a good resource for reviews of both current and legacy lenses, including many user reviews with sample pictures using the lenses.
     
  16. W9TR

    W9TR Well-Known Member

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    So your package includes the 18-55 kit lens. That's a great start.

    I would buy a 20mm prime - a small lens physically that will allow you to shoulder or neck carry the camera for vacation and street photography. With a 24 mp sensor you can crop and zoom on your computer and still have amazingly sharp pictures.

    Another option if budget allows is a 10mm to 20mm zoom, which would still be smalll and have good overlap with the 18-55.

    Then I would be pretty much done. You could opt for a longer lens for wildlife photography - something that would take you out to 200mm. Anything longer and you are into a tripod situation.

    Tom
     

     

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  17. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    I'm starting to understand....awesome crash course here LOL.

    One of my concerns is that I keep reading that full frame is "better" (most from seasoned pros writing the articles). It makes me worried that I will want more detail. I don't have a $3,000 budget for a body but I want pro quality of work that could be sold and printed. I will be adding this to my list of services as well. I am a Web Designer and I usually refer clients out to my photographer friends. They often don't have time so it would be good to just be able to do it.
     
  18. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    I meant not a point and shoot.
     
  19. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

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    All good advice above.
    If I were getting into photography now, I'd go out and handle every single camera I could get my hands on, before buying anything.
    As a suggestion, and as an 'out of the box' thinker type, I would recommend looking at Sony mirrorless cameras too.

    I am biased in that I have a Nikon D7000 which I love(d), and two Sony's, a Nex-7 (24 megapixel crop) and an A7ii (24 meg FF) that I adapt any number of lenses to via adapters.

    Why limit yourself to Canon when you can choose from sooooo many out there?
     
  20. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox Super Member

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    Budget. Canon seems to be more bang for the buck compared to Nikon. Especially the lenses.

    And that IS part of my problem. Too many choices makes it even more confusing to a beginner.
     

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