Help Me Get Started...I Need Everything

Discussion in 'Cameras and Photography' started by Killer Fox, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks. The FF Canon 6D I'm looking at is actually slightly smaller and lighter than the 80D crop.
     
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  2. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member


    The 6D is an excellent choice and is lightweight. I think you will be very happy with it, too.

    See if you can pair it with a 35mm f/2 or go all-out with a 24-70 II f2.8 IS (yes, expensive),... BUT... you will be the cat's meow with that setup. You could practically shoot everything with it and feel very confident about your images and investment.
     
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  3. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I might have to wait a few months to add that one. The 6D I'm getting is body only. Need a couple " all around" lenses. What 2 should I get? Or would you get I should say.
     
  4. No Money

    No Money AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    These days there is very little difference between the major brands, in fact a lot of us refer to as Canikony, (it used to be Canikon until Sony came along). So the 6D is fine, in fact, great.

    I occasionaly run workshops for photographers and the thing I try to get into peoples heads is that the equipment is only a small part of the equation. The most important part of photography doesn't involve the camera.

    It involves your eye and brain.

    As someone said, "Most of the worlds greatest photographs were taken on equipment that would be considered unacceptabile by todays standards." I use lenses (and camera designs) from before the First World War at times.

    Don't sweat it in other words. Get out there and use the gear. Keep your kit as light as possibile, wear comfortabile shoes, and play. Make sure you enjoy yourself. Later, look at your photo's, see what went right and what didn't. Look at photobooks, websites, and find images like what you want to make and reverse engineer them. Work out what they did. And then try it yourself. Best way to learn.

    And to start with I would suggest one lens. If you have access to the metadata from your old camera look for the focal length you made the majority of your pictures at. That can give you a guide as to the focal length of the lens to get. Most often it will be at either the widest or longest of the zoom length. Get a fixed focal length (or "prime") at that length. (Fror me it has always been a 35mm equivalent). At the most get two, a wide (say 28 or 35) and a short tele (a 85 maybe).

    But most of all, have fun!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  5. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Excellent advice and I totally agree. But I can't take photos without a camera so this process is necessary. The options can be paralyzing if I don't gather knowledge first. It's the best way to make an informed decision that I hopefully won't regret. You're screen name also applies to me. LOL.

    I have eyes and a brain so I'm good there. Could probably use an upgrade though. I'm actually taking a photography course starting in March.

    Just like building a stereo system, I want to get set up nicely so I can just focus (no pun lol) on the activity and not the gear.

    My 6D body is on the way. :)
     
  6. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member

    At a start, I would consider a prime. A 35mm, 50mm (and not the thrifty 50) or 85mm would be ideal in your bag. I’m not bashing the thifty 50, but it’s too much plastic and the motor is noisy,...it does take very good images though.

    The 24-105mm L is reasonably priced and should do you well. A very practical lens.

    Purchase a good bag. Think Tank and Lowepro come to mind as decent quality. Look for an EX430 flash, cheap and gets the job done. Don’t skimp on the memory cards either. Snag an extra battery for camera backup.

    Just a few thoughts. You’ll have a very reasonable setup.
     
  7. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    How does this combo sound to start out?

    Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM (or should I go with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L II for zero overlap?)

    Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L IS

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
     
  8. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I will need to sell some gear from other hobbies to get these LOL.
     
  9. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member

    In deciding between the 24-105 and the 24-70 II, I decided on the latter because it was on sale at the time and I had the 70-200mm. The 24-105 is rugged with great build quality but I like the 24-70 optics, it’s a step above IMHO.

    If you are seriously looking at a 70-200mm then you have to go with the f2.8. It’s a workhorse of a lens, great for portraits, sports,...whatever you shoot really. It’s fast and great for low light.

    All the Canon 50s have their ups and downs. Watch a few YT videos. Consider the Sigma 50mm ART, too.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  10. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member

    ^^^my 2 cents,... but I like going with Canon lenses on Canon bodies for the communication factor. Again, this is my opinion.
     
  11. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    I would suggest an ultra wide if you think you want to do any architectural photography on your Italy trip, especially for indoor shots.
     
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  12. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member

    The 16-35 f4 is a very good lens.
     
  13. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    What are you going to carry this around in? I have a Tenba backpack, and it's nice because it's hands free, but it doesn't really have room for the bigger lenses. And its a bit of a PITA that you have to take it off every time you want to get something out.
     
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  14. 8xlaxx

    8xlaxx Super Member

    +1
    Bags have been a nemesis for me. I have a backpack and hate it. I like my Streetwalker but am thinking about a Billingham at some point.
     
  15. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    Well I wouldn’t say I hate mine. I just wish it was easier to get stuff in and out of. But I guess if you want 100% hands free carry then you have to deal with the hassle.
     
  16. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

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    I need to invest in a good back pack. Went out shooting at the pier today, had three lenses, two cameras w/lenses and left most in the trunk while I used one camera w/lens. Really need to look at that some more to get a grip on what I take and use.
     
  17. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm going to wait until I have most if the gear I want before choosing a pack. I sometimes actually make sense. LOL.

    Lens wise I decided to just start with a Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM only for now and saving up for a Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM to be purchased in May. I will add a "pancake" along the way whenever I feel the need.
     
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  18. mhedges

    mhedges Super Member

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    That seems reasonable.

    As an aside, I always wonder about the aperture ratings of the "constant-aperture" zooms. Like, are they actually faster at the wide end, but they are purposely derated by the manufacturer because constant aperture is perceived to be a sign of quality? Kind of like with audio amplifiers - doubling up on power going from 8 ohms to 4 is seen as being good. But in reality almost no amp actually does this. Instead the manufacturers derate the 8 ohm power spec to be half the 4 ohm value.
     
  19. Killer Fox

    Killer Fox AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Not sure but I read a lot of them lose a bit.

    The 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II seems to be consistent throughout from reading reviews. I can tell I would want to upgrade to this soon so I may as well wait and get what I really want. The reviews are all stellar.
     
  20. Danddd

    Danddd AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I see no one has chimed in with Micro 4/3s. Full frame is great for depth of field. I still have my Nikon 90S and FM film cameras. I had a Nikon crop digital, a D300. But once I got into Micro 4/3s I never looked back. Great quality with either Olympus or Panasonic. And there are many regular and pro lenses. Plus, the light weight. I can stuff my Panasonic GX7 in my backpack with the 20mm 1.7 = to a 40mm 3.4 FF in my backpack when I travel. A lot depends on the type of photography you plan to do. I have moved to more street photography, so small fits my needs. But the quality of M4/3 is very good.
     

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