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How to insulate garage?

Discussion in 'General Off Topic Forums' started by brian222, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. brian222

    brian222 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Gladwin, Mi.
    First time doing this. Need a little help. I can't afford to do it all this year so should I start with walls or roof?
    Also should I use the pink stuff or the firm poly? Thanks.
     

     

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  2. Harvestor

    Harvestor Super Member

    R-30 Pink with Paper barrier Roof....#1
     
  3. RichPA

    RichPA Don't drive angry Staff Member Super Mod Subscriber

    If the walls are fairly wind-tight, I'd start with roof - that's where you'll lose the most heat in winter, and have the most heat from in summer. We used the pink stuff.
     
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  4. savatage1973

    savatage1973 Addicted Member

    Messages:
    6,372
    Location:
    NW Pennsylvania snow belt
    Agreed--roof and pink stuff first--that is going to make the biggest immediately noticeable difference, and it is a much bigger PITA than the walls, so get it out of the way. You'll be able to knock out all 4 walls in half the time it takes to do the roof.

    BTW--invest in a "good" staple gun--you won't regret it.
     
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  5. quaddriver

    quaddriver 120 What's per channel Subscriber

    if you are wanting insulation because you are thinking heating it, then yes, +2, roof first or else the heat will melt snow and rot your roof from the drip edge back

    24" on center? they have kraft faced pink (or yeller) that will do and you can sheet with 3/8 OSB at a later date (back when OSB was $4.97 a sheet I did the inside walls and ceiling of mine and painted it white. you will be surprised how much light reflects.
     
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  6. brian222

    brian222 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Gladwin, Mi.
    Yes 24"...thanks.
     

     

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  7. brian222

    brian222 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Gladwin, Mi.
    Thanks for all replies. Roof it is.
     
  8. slow_jazz

    slow_jazz AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    SE Michigan, Downriver....
    Good luck.
     
  9. nedseg

    nedseg AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    511
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I hired a kid from a local GED building trades program to (help) insulate and drywall my garage - best investment ever, and he was strong as an ox.
    The flat roof (trusses) was already drywalled, but not insulated other than the 2-3" or so of bluefoam in it's built-up structure, and I do regret not having done that at the time.
    I've had several blow-in insulation companies look at it, but they all gave quotes higher than I can afford. (Concern about moisture build up too, I think - at least they all scratched their heads at it.)
    But - as the others have said, without good roof insulation, it's just not a 4 season work space, so yah, start there.
    When I had nat. gas brought in (previously an all electric house), I had them run the (flex) line through the garage ceiling, so I can drop in a decent sized heater in there....someday.
    PS. I've added a bathroom vent fan (NIB, cheap at ReStore) on an interval timer to exhaust moisture from the garage, which I've found helps keep down rust on the car and tools, esp in winter.
    Have fun - it's a neat little project!
     
  10. a_retent

    a_retent Daddy's little shadow Subscriber

    Messages:
    656
    Location:
    St. Paul, MN
    Okay, this is gonna be long winded.

    I did my 2 stall detached a few years ago because I outgrew my basement woodshop. As you can see by my location we kinda know cold. First up was replacing the rotted single thickness overhead doors with R-15.67 foam core and adjusted the jambs to stop the massive air leak. The doors were so bad you could see daylight between the panels and would get almost an inch of frost on the inside just from parking the cars in there during the winter months. Even when the doors were new we could never get it warm below the knees.
    Next was to start taking down the 1/8th inch paneling on the ceiling as I knew it had inadequate insulation. Much to my surprize over the years my frugal father had been disposing all of his shipping peanuts between the joists :eek:...what a mess! While the ceiling was open I addressed the inadequate lighting with more wiring for florescent fixtures, insulated with kraft faced R-15, covered with poly and closed it up with 5/8th OSB painted whited.
    On a side note:
    Visually check the area your going to cut on OSB. I have literally found nails, bolts and other items embedded in the OSB that saw blades don't appreciate.
    Thanks be for less drama when doing the walls. Still had to remove the cheap paneling and R-7 insulation. Replaced with R-15, siliconed the gaps between bottom wall plate and cement slab on the inside to stop floor draft, poly over insulation, 5/8ths OSB with another layer of 1/4 inch OSB left natural for the look. With approx. 3/4" wall board I can put a nail just about anywhere and have it hold.

    The conclusion is a shop that's tee-shirt temperature from head to foot when it's -15°F outside from a single vented antique propane heater (thanks Grandpa) and a desk fan. Yah, some of my Dad rubbed off. :rolleyes:

    If you are satisfied with lighting, overhead door opener placement and all electrical locations then as previously suggested I would get that ceiling done first. And yes, a good stapler is a must. Stainless steel staples are a plus but not necessary. My garage is 2"x4" construction with flooring in the attic for storage so I was limited to R-15 but if you can do more that would be even better. Choice of wall board is up to you, I used OSB painted white because it was inexpensive and I hate mudding/taping seams.

    Next I would check to be sure doors and windows are up to the job, if they need replacing now is the time not after you get your nice new walls up. This would also be a good time to assess any electrical concerns or improvements/additions. Don't forget to pack some loose insulation around any door or window frames while the walls are open and caulk up any obvious gaps especially if you can see daylight through them.

    Don't be cheap. A well insulated garage keeps you warm in the winter and cooler in the summer in addition to increasing resale popularity/value.

    That's my experience, all my best to you and your project. :thumbsup:
     

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