Interesting cooling solution for stacking components.

Discussion in 'General Audio Discussion' started by MannyE, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    I am designing the new layout of my HT system and searching for different rack cooling solutions when I came across these products that might be a way to safely stack a pre/pro on top of an amp.

    If the rear-exhaust version of the cooler works as advertised, it will help get more components into less space. I'm going to give it a try.


    https://www.acinfinity.com/componen...lower-system-rear-exhaust-12/#product-reviews
     
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  2. FONSguy

    FONSguy Super Member

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    I've always used the 7" "whisper Fans" used in the mini-computer era. Got several cheep and even a set of their stronger brothers in a 4 fan array that are NOT whisper fans, but high volume, so I use that set with my spray booth.
     
  3. xero-D-hero

    xero-D-hero Super Member

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    Cool link,prices look pretty reasonable as well.
    I'll hafta save that site to my favorites & pop back over there later on when I got more time to explore.
    Being a rack mount kinda guy that sorta stuff is always worth checking out.

    :thumbsup:

    Bret P.
     
  4. House de Kris

    House de Kris Loud-n-Deep

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    I bought an AC Infinity fan a couple weeks ago. It is indeed quiet. I'm quite happy with it. If you are stacking components, it would seem the linked fan is a little small in both width and depth.
     
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  5. Blue Shadow

    Blue Shadow Waiting for Vintage Gear from this century Subscriber

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    Seems to mean there is a market for a unit that would fit regular rack gear and be able to support other gear as well as fill in from side to side and front to back to allow stacking. I don't know if there is a solution for those with big recievers as each is a different size. But being able to put the amp down there then the fan then another component and have the stack look right would garner some sales.
     
  6. toxcrusadr

    toxcrusadr Omelette du Fromage Subscriber

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    That calls for some kind of an extendable/adjustable part that can fit on top of different sized components.
     

     

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  7. Decibel_116

    Decibel_116 AK Subscriber

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    I wonder if it has an air filter to keep from forcing dust into the component.
     
  8. GreyOwl

    GreyOwl Active Member

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    It looks kike the fan pulls hot air out of the unit, not blowing into the unit.
     
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  9. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Staff Member Super Mod Moderator Subscriber

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    Any time forced air, of any kind, is used to cool gear, the problem of dust collection increases by orders of magnitude. This will require the removal of gear and fan units, on a regular basis, to remove the dust collected within. If filters are used, clogging of said filters will reduce cooling ability much faster. Fan noise is another issue to consider. Like most things, compromise and trade-offs are required.

    Rich P
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  10. Decibel_116

    Decibel_116 AK Subscriber

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    If it pulls from the bottom, it may force slightly less dust. However, most venting of amplifiers is from the top on consumer gear and is cooled via convection. I don't see very much cooling effect other than fans venting the heat from convection away from the case. That may keep components stacked on top cooler (depending on the case design).
     
  11. twiiii

    twiiii Addicted Member

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    All your major broadcast rack companies have cooling systems for their racks. The issue is the noise of the different cooling modules. Its always a tricky situation in quiet home environments. A few customers had closets with their amps, processing EQ's and crossovers. The had a small separate room air conditioner for each closet that kept the temps down to 68 degrees. I use cooling fans for critical areas with thermo stats. If you look to the left there are two 4" fans in series for the stacked Mac power amps both pushing. The center section has two more fans one pushing and one pulling. . In the other cabinet there is a fan between the HT processor and the AM FM tuner and the two DVD players are fine as the top unit has its own exhaust fan. I have cooking thermometers in critical arras. And so far no thing gets much above 90 degrees.
     
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  12. E-Stat

    E-Stat AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Cooling is but one issue. I’d still not want to place a preamp directly atop a power amp’s power transformer to minimize EMI.
     
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  13. Bratwurst7s

    Bratwurst7s In The Frying Pan Subscriber

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    This! If one doesn't want dust the fans need to be a "pusher" setup with filters on the intake side. This is how "clean rooms" are done. The filters need to be easy to access and clean.

    http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/index.php?threads/new-old-stereo-tv-stand.608556/#post-8031682

    Cheers,
    James
     
  14. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    perhaps with a filter on the bottom of the component a'la an air conditioner the dust can be reduced and the filters can be easily cleaned when needed. This feels a lot like the early days of computer water cooling where the end user was engineering solutions at home.
     
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  15. xero-D-hero

    xero-D-hero Super Member

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    If one is using some sort of enclosure there are "panel" style filters to filter all the air that enters the enclosure.
    Then the issue is pretty much taken care of before the cooling fan(s).

    Here's a link to an example from one of the more common vendors of that sorta stuff:
    https://www.middleatlantic.com/products/accessories/thermal-management/filter-panel/filter.aspx
    And a pic vvvv to give an idea what I'm talking about.
    [​IMG]

    I've seen these in various sizes from numerous rack gear vendors.

    FWIW

    Bret P.
     
  16. twiiii

    twiiii Addicted Member

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    Here in this part of the South west with our very low humidity, homes aren't built as tight. or with as much insulation as homes in colder climates. With population growth and concerns with water consumption with higher temps old style swamp coolers drawing air through dampened cooler pads has become a no no. So when I moved into the current house we changed the windows, had all the walls stuffed with insulation added a ft of insulation in the ceiling and changed to Refrigerated air. The new insulation and windows had cut our heating bill to a 1/3 of the previous winter. So the next Spring we had the Carrier people install refrigerated air. We also had new exterior doors installed. Well that's been 12 years ago. We are known in this part of the world for our wind storms, but in the spring when the temps start getting over 80+ degrees the first winds bring dust and with higher temps the sand blows. Well, fortunately with the Hurd windows and new doors dirt is not a problem anymore. Yes we use the door at the rear of the house when the wind is blowing severely as it is shielded from the wind and its easier to keep that end of the house clean. But what I am trying to say is the hi fi system doesn't need to be torn down every year anymore for cleaning. Covers don't have to be removed and the interior vacuumed like in the old days back in the 60's and 70's. When you live in an apartment while in school paying your way and starting out in life dirt from dust storms was just a way of life and you had to vacuum your system every year while wiping off the dust after each storm. You would think with your house pressurized and filtered with swamp coolers the dirt wouldn't be an issue, but it is. So having the house at a constant temp with filtered air keeps the Hifi happy and has reduced my allergy medicine bill tremendously. I opened my 861 and 891's the other day and they were still like new. When I opened the 206 to replace the lamps it was clean, too even with two fans pushing cool air over the exterior. The piece that collects the most dust is the MPI-4. Older tube Tv's were big dust collectors. I guess its all the high voltage inside. In the old days we could have sand standing on the window sills a 1/16 thick. Not a problem today. Outside its nothing to find piles of sand a 1/4 in deep. We don't have the tremendous walls of sand that you see in videos of Phoenix, but people have to keep their pools covered and constantly cleaned until the 1st of June when the Wind storms stop. We still have wind but it changes direction and the monsoon season has started in Arizona and New Mexico so the sand is no longer a big problem. Our Monsoon starts the 4th of July and further prevents any more sand till the next March. Right now its winds from the North and North east bring the winter cold thats the issue. It will be 62 degrees here today. with bight sun. Just another ho hum day in paradise. Who needs a jacket or long underwear?
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 10:40 AM
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  17. beanoil

    beanoil That's not how this works

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    Spot on. Look in any computer tower that has run for a few months.
    Filthy pigs on the inside. Electronics naturally gather dust. Forced air gathers 100 times faster.
    I've always stacked gear, but made sure there was space between, and the warmest unit on top.
     
  18. Bratwurst7s

    Bratwurst7s In The Frying Pan Subscriber

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    Btw, I was in no way meaning to be negative about your discovery. It looks like an interesting piece of equipment and I made a link to it for further study. Thanks for pointing it out.

    Cheers,
    James
     
  19. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    I didn't get that from you at all. I think it's good to look at new and interesting stuff that will make enjoying audio easier. If these work, and I think they will, they can help space challenged enthusiasts cram more gear into a smaller space or OCD design maniacs (that's a little bit me) organize the gear in a way that's more pleasing to the eye as well as cramming more gear into less space.

    Of course I'll never know until I try it.
     
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  20. MannyE

    MannyE Exterminate! Subscriber

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    That would be great if the rack is enclosed and relatively "airtight" but for my open shelf situation each component needs its own little solution. But that's kind of the idea I'm talking about. The other, less attractive solution would be to filter the incoming air and use the ones that shoot air up into the component. So they would draw cool air from in front of the rack/shelf and blow clean air up through the heatsinks and out the top. But that would still need airspace between whatever you put on top.
     

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