Music Related Books

Discussion in 'Music Forums' started by poppachubby, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. SoundOfMySol

    SoundOfMySol Member

    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    I've just completed two great reads and highly recommend both:

    "I'll Take You There; Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, and the March up Freedom Highway" by Greg Kot

    and

    "All Hopped Up and Ready To Go; Music From the Streets of New York 1927-1977" by Tony Fletcher
     
    BillyBatts and poppachubby like this.
  2. chicks

    chicks Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    17,012
    Location:
    The Big Valley, CA
    Picked up this great coffee table book at one of the discount home goods stores.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. bobsvinyl

    bobsvinyl Painfully Aware Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,891
    Location:
    Milford, NH
    That looks really interesting, chicks. I'll have to hunt that down. :thumbsup:
     
  4. onepixel

    onepixel .

    Messages:
    31,844
    The only music related book I have is Andy Warhol: The Record Covers 1949 - 1987.

    Andy.gif
     
    BillyBatts and poppachubby like this.
  5. stevo137

    stevo137 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,493
    Location:
    Northwest Indiana
    This is a great little book.

    image.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2017
    BillyBatts likes this.
  6. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    Got two tasty treats from Amazon 3rd party sellers this week;

    [​IMG]

    "Moanin' at Midnight" the life and times of Howlin' Wolf by Segrest and Hoffman. This was recommended by KrisM our resident Blues Guru.

    "The World of Count Basie" by Stanley Dance. This was recommeded by Gannon, as we were discussing my love for Sweets Edison and Gannon told me Sweets was discussed in this book.

    Both have the bonus photos in center that I love;

    [​IMG]

    Diving into these this weekend.
     
  7. Mowgli

    Mowgli Runs with scissors Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,387
    Location:
    Clinton, Taxachusetts
    I've had that Wolf book in my cart for many months but it's still there.
    Please let us know how it is.
     
    BillyBatts likes this.
  8. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    Will do. The Basie book is excellent. I'll be finished with it by tonight. Tomorrow or Tuesday I'll start on Wolf. I'll let you know, but from what I have heard from other AKers that read it, they said it was very good.
     
    Mowgli likes this.
  9. KrisM

    KrisM Addicted Member

    Messages:
    8,626
    If you like the Wolf you'll want to read it.:thumbsup:
     
    Mowgli likes this.
  10. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    Another new one from Half Priced Books in St. Louis came today. I bought it via the Amazon 3rd party seller option. Great deal at well under 10 bucks delivered, and it looks brand new.

    Can't Be Satisfied, The Life and Times of Muddy Waters by Robert Gordon

    [​IMG]
     
    CoryS06, KrisM, Mowgli and 1 other person like this.
  11. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    OK, just finished the Howlin' Wolf. IMO, a truly STELLAR read. I'd give it a look if I were you. Lots of surprises for me in that book, starting with his size. I had no idea the man was 6'3", 300 lbs with size 16 shoes. The writing is elegant, precise, and keeps you reading. An amazing account of his music and his life.
     
    KrisM, poppachubby and Mowgli like this.
  12. Mowgli

    Mowgli Runs with scissors Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,387
    Location:
    Clinton, Taxachusetts
    Thanks for the update @BillyBatts
    Sounds like a winner!
     
    BillyBatts likes this.
  13. noisefreq

    noisefreq AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    242
    Location:
    Independence
    IMG_20170322_110847.jpg

    "The Age of Bowie" by Paul Morley is a biography written from the author's perspective. Morley, being a huge fan, both illuminates and infuriates with his exuberance.
    The beginning of the book comes off as cathartic for the writer and maybe does or doesn't equate to how the reader might come to grips with the death of their Bowie.

    However, the first half of the book does cover the first 20 years of Bowie's life which I found very informative. I really only knew Bowie after Hunky Dory, his third album. His early influences and recordings were an unknown to me.

    Morley has a unique writing style that tends to run on. Once you get into the pace of his writing style it's easier to follow where he's going. It reminded me of how Burroughs can confound the reader but I'm in no way comparing the two writers just the difficult pace of the writing.

    After getting a good understanding of where Bowie or Davie Jones came from and who influenced him in his formative years, it seems like the writer is setting up for a big payoff later in the book but the payoff never comes. His equations of how these early influences manifest in his later work seems a little weak to me.

    The thing I liked most about this book is at the end of each chapter, one for each year throughout Bowie's 70's period, the author listed important or seminal recordings made by other artists of that year. These must have been favorites of the author because not all the artists listed were at the top of the charts or even popular at the time. I must say I agree with about 98% of his choices and maybe I need to go back and reevaluate some of the others.
    I can see how this might put some readers off, but for me it legitimized much of my record collection.

    For a novice of Bowie, one might gleem a lot of great truth in this book but for someone who has followed Bowie over his career, you may feel as I did that much of the holes in my understanding of his mindset is not sated.
    Or perhaps, what was important for the writer to convey is not what I hoped I would gather from this book.

    Either way, I was disappointed in the arc of the timeline. Morley trys to justify this by explaining how one can't talk about Bowie's work in a chronological order; Bowie's life has too many jump cuts between artistic periods, hence, the early influences on later artistic expressions.
    I found this opinion a vail attempt to get this book written in a short period of time.
    A couple of years from the late 70's were even glossed over as if nothing worth writing about, happened. This really chapped my hide as his "Berlin Period" is my favorite of all his work.

    But you have to draw a line somewhere and I guess that was his. Otherwise you could make this 496 pages into a 2000 page microscopic dissection.

    The last 30 years of Bowie's career/life are covered in less than the last 100 pages.
    His acting career and one offs like the Queen and Jagger songs are quickly covered and given about as much attention as each of his last dozen albums. Yeah, much of his later records don't hold a candle to his 70's period but I really liked a couple of those later releases and would have liked to know more about them.

    Morley's association with the "David Bowie Is" exhibition is touted and is used as the closer of the book. Most of his experiences with the exhibit are anecdotal at best and are really an unnecessary inclusion.

    All in all, I liked the book ok but it only makes me want to find a more comprehensive bio from a more disassociated author.
    Perhaps, an artist like Bowie very well may not be able to be contained all in one book, or even, at all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
    BillyBatts likes this.
  14. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    I had to read this, Chicks. So it's ordered from my library. Should be here in a few days. Don't think I want to buy it unless I can find it used on the cheap. But I am really looking forward to reading it.
     
  15. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA!

    Followed Chick's Lead and got a copy of "Vinyl - The Art of Making Records"

    Great coffee table book indeed. Lots of rich full color bleed photos and insets. Interesting background stories on the industry and the music. The book is separated into "Decades", so you can go chronologically or just concentrate on a particular decade. There are also record brand secions, like the "Verve" section in the photo below.
    This is a Library copy just to get my feet wet, but after reading it for a few hours, I am definitely going to buy a copy for the permanent library.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  16. Ned Blohard

    Ned Blohard AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    $_35.JPG

    Not sure this book has been mentioned here... Crosstown Traffic: Jim Hendrix and Postwar Pop by Charles Shaar Murray
    Not a biography, rather a whole history of pop music (and jazz too) post WWII with the unifying theory that Jimi Hendrix was the culmination and bisecting point of all of it.
    I read it in high school and it kind of blew my mind.
    It's been reissued and it's hard to find a picture of it with this original cover but man, the combination of that Flying V, the green jacket, the pink of the title box... so rock and roll... I loved it!
     
  17. amely

    amely New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    USA
    All music books are just awesome, A History of Western Music" by Donald Jay Grout is my favourite bokok
     
    KrisM likes this.
  18. qdrone

    qdrone Music is my mistress

    Messages:
    4,383
    Location:
    just a taste outside the law
    Dancing With Myself / Billy Idol
    Great read penned by Mr. Broad (his real name) which chronicles his life and where his mis adventures took him. Follows him from Generation X to his solo career and the few movie roles he acquired. Filled with the excesses of Sex, Drugs and Rock n Roll, Idol makes no excuses and owns up to them as learning experiences which brought him to where he is now, at peace and hopeful about his future. The end of the book is very reflective as he looks back on his life and the people who helped shape his meteoric rise in the 80's as he fused punk and rock n roll into a viable commodity.
    If I take one thing from this book its if you are trying to succeed be sociable, rub elbows with everyone in that circle of that field of work because you might find those people who can lead to your ultimate goal. He still performs today.
     
  19. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

    Messages:
    4,778
    Location:
    Newark NJ
  20. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

    Messages:
    4,778
    Location:
    Newark NJ
    18156886_10211403355213780_5171660071995812368_n.jpg
     
    CoryS06 likes this.

Share This Page