Music Related Books

Discussion in 'Music Forums' started by poppachubby, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. BlindBoyGrnt

    BlindBoyGrnt Nullius in verba

    Thank you noisefreq, excellent revue.
     
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  2. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    I read this a while back and forgot to post it here.

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    Record Store Days --by Gary Calamar and Phil Gallo
    An interesting read covering record stores from the early days (1930's) up to the last decade. Mostly zeros in on stores in major metropolitan cities. It gives great insight into the politics of the record business, innovations in record sales over the years and the major players who worked behind the scenes.
    Changed my perspective from a regional view (Kansas City) to an understanding of how the business evolved on a national scale.
    Lots of great pictures and personal anecdotes scattered throughout from famous people who dig records.
    What made the biggest impression on me was the price of records in the late 40's early 50's were going for $3 and $4! Compare that to today's economy and we got it pretty darn good.
     
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  3. Luckyorleans

    Luckyorleans Active Member

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    A Romance on Three Legs: Glenn Gould's Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Piano

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    A very enjoyable read, I have read this one a couple of times. The book is as much about about Gould and his idiosyncrasies, as it is Steinway pianos and the virtually blind piano tuner, Verne Edquist. The NY Times faults the book for being overly technical but for me that is what made it interesting and not just another chronicle of Gould the eccentric - which has been well documented. The book goes deeper and in other directions, as it follows Gould's search for his perfect piano that he finds in the battered Steinway grand No. CD 318, and then follows through until the ultimate end of the piano.
     
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  4. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    Seems like an excellent premise for a look at Gould. Thanks for sharing, will keep my eyes out for this one.

    EDIT:

    Do you have a background with piano?? Just wondering how that may have played into your enjoyment. If the book is overly technical, I'm not sure if I would like it or not.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2017
  5. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    Wow, what a fantastic review. I must say, you should edit the paragraphs to include a line of space. It will entice people to read as it will look more inviting.

    I understood your passion after only a few lines. I love jazz too, but I have never been a huge Art Pepper fan. That's not to say that I don't understand his brilliance, or why people love him so deeply.

    You should send this review to Laurie Pepper. She is a lovely and warm woman, who would love to hear what you thought about the book. Chances are, with such a superb overview, you can get some dialogue happening with her. Try through her website, or the usual social media sites.

    I have a few of Pepper's albums from his Contemporary years. Obviously the Rhythm Section album has transcended to one of the greatest ever, but he had so much amazing material in his later career. One player I do really love is Chet Baker, and their careers both had that "2-stage" quality. My favorite albums are definitely Baker's later ones.
     
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  6. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    I love the Allman Bros Band and yet I have never read this - need to!!
     

     

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  7. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    This is a great idea. Talk to one of the mods for the Music Forum. That's how this thread became a sticky. Infact, I have a couple stickys in the music forum. If its a "cool" idea, they are usually open to trying it. Worst case scenario is that it fails spectacularly and they unstick it. However I think it would have legs.
     
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  8. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    For anybody that wants an overview...


    http://lauriepepper.net/who-was-he.html
     
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  9. Luckyorleans

    Luckyorleans Active Member

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    Good question! I have zippo piano or musical training background - can't even play chopsticks. I found the level of technical detail in the book bang on to make it interesting but still completely accessible.
     
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  10. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    Thank you poppachubby!
    I believe it was your comment in onwardjames' thread that inspired me to buy Straight Life.
    And thanks for the link. I wasn't aware of Laurie Pepper's other book.
     
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  11. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    Haha that's great to hear!! The book really stands on its own, separate from the music, to be enjoyed. Yes I hope you will contact Laurie and send her your review.
     

     

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  12. KeninDC

    KeninDC Speedfreak Jive Subscriber

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    I've read Straight Life and Record Store Days.

    Art Pepper's book is brutally honest. I love the work he did with fellow junky, Chet Baker. But as poppachubster points out, Art's later work is worth checking out. Same goes for Chet Baker's later concerts. Both men, though wrecked from drug abuse, could put out some passionately lyrical passages that break out from the confines of the late 50s jazz structure.

    I just finished Deal, by the Grateful Dead's drummer, Bill Kreutzmann. A breezy, entertaining read. Good insight into Jerry's addictions and the pressure of keeping the entire Grateful Dead machine running.
     
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  13. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    Not a big Dead fan but again, don't need to be for a read like that. My favorite Chet Baker album is Live In Tokyo. He was hot and cold for shows - but when he was on, wow.
     
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  14. skynyrd77

    skynyrd77 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Will do! I think it's a great idea. And cheap because we can use media mail
     
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  15. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

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    [​IMG]


    The Death of Rhythm and Blues

    By Nelson George
     
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  16. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History Of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain (Abacus 1997 edition)
    IMG_20170805_141617.jpg

    Just finished this and I know it's been mentioned here before but I liked the book and wanted to give it a shout out. This is probably not for everyone.
    It's written in an interview style with recounts from groupies, musicians, industry people, bar owners, hangers on and the authors themselves with multiple prospectives that paint a full (sometimes painfully so) picture of the events.
    Covers mid 60's to early 80's of about a dozen seminal bands that existed in and around the New York City and Detroit scenes.

    I bet most readers come away with disbelief of the depravity that is described in this book. A different time I guess.
    I just kept thinking how the behavior of most of these people changed after the introduction of HIV to this country. You simply could not share sex and needles like everyone did in the 70's and live unscathed.

    My favorite recount is from Cyrinda Fox regarding Johnny Thunders:
    "I put him in the shower and scrubbed him. He was just so bad, he was so bad, I just never saw anybody that bad in my life. He had these big scars, lumps, and bumps, and his feet were filthy; he had big bruises where he had been shooting up all over his feet, and on his legs, and anywhere he could shoot up. Abscesses everywhere.
    He was so gross, and I just wanted to scrub the evil out of him..."
     
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  17. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

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    Softly, With Feeling: Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music (Temple University Press, 2014)

    Ed Berger

    [​IMG]

    Just came from a memorial for the author of this book who died suddenly in Jan. the book has won the book award for Best Research in Recorded Jazz Music from The Association for Recorded Sound Collection.

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  18. CSCHOEN

    CSCHOEN Active Member

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    Santana "The Universal Tone" - Great read for those wishing to know more about Santana, the band and the story behind the music. Recommended.
     
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  19. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    At a book market in town today and picked up "The Lost Writings of JIM MORRISON".

    Not sure what to expect, but thought that I might get some insight into his character that other sources have shared. This book is of his poems and diary shares.

    From what I read, he saw himself as a poet first and an entertainer second, so that's another reason why I picked up this book.

    Q
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2017
  20. poppachubby

    poppachubby Boo Yaka! Boo Yaka! Subscriber

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    Wow I need this one, thanks fdrennen.
     
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