Music Related Books

Discussion in 'Music Forums' started by poppachubby, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. Jay Kay

    Jay Kay Member

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  2. Jay Kay

    Jay Kay Member

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    I’m reading Gioia’s jazz history now. Fascinating, incredible depth for a relatively short book.
     
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  3. satkinsn

    satkinsn low end audio Subscriber

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    On my short list of favorite music books are a couple of Gioia titles. His history of west coast jazz is great, will send you down a bunch of rabbit holes if you're not already well-versed in west coast/cool jazz.

    Even better, I think, is Gioia's very first book, the obscure "Jazz: The Imperfect Art." It's an eccentric essay about the nature of jazz - not for everybody, but I've read it and reread it with pleasure for 30 years. I put it up there with Evan Eisenberg's "The Recording Angel" and this year's "The New Analogue" by Damon Krukowski as great reads that come at music and sound from unusual angles.

    s.
     
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  4. Hajidub

    Hajidub Chihuahua/Pug = Chug Subscriber

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    A very simple read compared to some of the postings on here already, but ~Vinyl Junkies~.
     
  5. DirtFarmer

    DirtFarmer Active Member

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    This right here. ^^ I have several editions are they are (were?) indispensable to me when I was discovering jazz.
     
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  6. BillyBatts

    BillyBatts ALOHA! Subscriber

    Those Penguin guides to Jazz were the bible for us Jazz-Cats back then. Still a nice reference today.
     
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  7. Jay Kay

    Jay Kay Member

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    The Penguin Guide to Jazz, 5th edition, is fantastic. What pleased me more though, was when I found a mistake in it. I felt like I had come up a level.
     
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  8. satkinsn

    satkinsn low end audio Subscriber

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    I've kept selected earlier editions, since Morton and Cook would drop out some albums from version to version. I keep a copy of the first in the trunk of my car, for record shopping days.

    s.
     
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  9. HunterMcD

    HunterMcD Everything louder than everyone else Subscriber

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  10. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    SPACE IS THE PLACE -- THE LIVES AND TIMES OF SUN RA by John Szwed

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    I read this book a couple of months ago, actually I read it three times. I just found this book fascinating at every turn.

    I think this book has been listed here before but it's such a great explanation of what Sun Ra is all about that anyone with the slightest interest should pick it up.

    It's interesting to find out what he was reading, he was a voracious reader at an early age, as this shaped his perception of his world.
    His religious beliefs and his views on race relations and politics continued to evolve.
    I can relate to his frustration and can see why traveling the spaceways seems like a perfectly good idea.

    He was certainly a unique and complex personality and those around him saw the importance of what he was doing and protected him to a certain extent. Members of the Arkestra stayed with him for decades.

    The rehearsing.
    The Arkestra was always rehearsing, to the point of absurdity.
    And Sun Ra was constantly writing scores.

    The evolution of his music, rooted in big band and swing, influenced only by his inner beliefs and musical ideas, was running concurrently with other free jazzer's of the day. But he was doing his own thing.

    The very definition of a true maverick.
     
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  11. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    FREE JAZZ by Ekkehard Jost

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    I bought this book because it listed most of my favorite artists.
    It was written in 1974 which I suspected would lend a certain naivete to the examination.

    Coltrane is the central figure in the book, as could be expected.
    His name was already known by '58 and for him to embrace "the new thing" gave the scene creditability and lesser known players had something to point to as if to say "see...he gets it!"

    Miles, Mingus, Ornette, Cherry, Dolphy, Shepp, Ayler, AACM, Sun Ra...all are covered. Including many more supporting artists that are gems waiting for me to discover.

    The author is German which could explain his precise explanations of the evolution of free jazz.
    He gets down to the specific part of a specific song where giant steps (pun intended) are taken.
    Jost has a way of breaking it down to the molecular level and showing the advancements made, crystalline in his description.

    Certainly an academic read but interesting none the less.
    It helps if you can read music, I can't, but I muddled through.
     
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  12. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    I am troubled
    Immeasurably
    By your eyes

    I am struck
    By the feather
    of your soft
    Reply

    The sound of glass
    Speaks quick
    Disdain

    And conceals
    What your eyes fight
    To explain


    Jim Morrison
     
  13. Hajidub

    Hajidub Chihuahua/Pug = Chug Subscriber

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    Trouble Boys ~The true story of The Replacements~
     
  14. satkinsn

    satkinsn low end audio Subscriber

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    Been compiling a mental list of my favorite books about the history of radio.

    Here's what I have - there are many, many more books on the subject, so this represents what I think are the best.

    Erik Barnouw - "A Tower In Babel." Part 1 of his magistral three part history of broadcasting. Returning to this after 30 years, I find it to be as good as I remember it.

    Susan Douglas - "Listening In: Radio And The American Imagination."

    Jesse Walker - "Rebels On The Air: An Alternate History of Radio In America." What would have happened if we hadn't gone the FCC route?

    Marc Fisher - "Something In The Air." A great one volume history that fills in the gap between, roughly, the end of Barnouw and the current Radio 2.0 era. Includes the best coverage of underground FM, the origins of NPR, early satellite radio.

    Matthew Lasar - "Radio 2.0: Uploading The First Broadcast Medium." The first big catch-up on modern day radio/audio, written for a general audience. Excellent.

    not on the list because they're a bit too specialized, but worth a read:

    Christopher Sterling - "Sounds of Change: A history of FM Broadcasting in America."

    John N. Anderson - "Radio's Digital Dilemma: Broadcasting In The 21st Century." Excellent analysis of HD radio's struggles. Written before the company backing HD radio changed hands (twice) but worth the read anyway. Two cautions: either rent the book for Kindle or get it from your library. It's stupidly expensive to buy. Second, it's a very readable book except for the introduction/1st chapter, which is written in stilted academic prose. Get past it and you've got a valuable resource.

    Anybody got a book to contribute?

    s.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017
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  15. satkinsn

    satkinsn low end audio Subscriber

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    Let me highly recommend his Miles Davis and Billie Holiday books as well.

    s.
     
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  16. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Super Member

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    Cold electric music
    Damage me
    Rend my mind
    w/your dark slumber

    Cold temple of steel
    Cold minds alive
    on the strangled shore

    Veterans of foreign wars
    We are soldiers of
    Rock & Roll Wars


    Jim Morrison


    Q
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018

     

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  17. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

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    [​IMG]


    Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties By Scott Saul
     
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  18. satkinsn

    satkinsn low end audio Subscriber

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    How is this?

    s.
     
  19. fdrennen

    fdrennen Organist in Residence

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    Working on it now, I'll tell you about this latter.
     
  20. noisefreq

    noisefreq Well-Known Member

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    THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PUNK
    By Brian Cogan

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    A musician friend of mine gave me this incredible A to Z encyclopedia of punk and it's various offshoots.

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    Covers the movers and shakers of the punk world from musicians to zine writers to club owners and promotors.

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    There's not much left out here, local scenes, band connections, rivalries, and back stories.

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    And beautiful full color illustrations on every eye popping page.

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    The writing is very engaging and includes discographies, dates and stand out releases. My only complaint would be not much for album cover art but that can be found in other books. A real fun read!
     
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