My old Yamaha RX500U

Discussion in 'General Audio Discussion' started by pursang, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. pursang

    pursang New Member

    Messages:
    5
    I bought this new back in the day and for many years now it's been acting up, turning the volume knob produces crackling and the right speaker cuts out and now seems to be permanently stuck at a lower level than it should be, other crackling sounds come from turning the loudness knob, I was hoping replacing a simple fuse would make me a happy camper but not so, the pictures show a more serious problem, my question is can I or should I fix this myself ? also is it safe to use ? it still works just not like it used to.

    YamahaRX500U-1.JPG YamahaRX500U-2.JPG
     

     

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  2. musichal

    musichal poet emeritus Subscriber

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    Don't use it 'til you fix it, or have it fixed. I'll leave the should-you-try-yourself-question for the technically-experienced.
     
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  3. DaveVoorhis

    DaveVoorhis Super Member

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    The crackling volume knob is easy. You might be able to fix it simply by turning it back and forth repeatedly. If not, a spray of Deoxit or other contact cleaner will generally fix it. See the "The Idiot's Guide to Using DeOxit (revisited)" post at the top of this forum for more information.

    How easy it will be for you to fix the right speaker cutting out depends on your general do-it-yourself skills and your electronics skills in particular. Your pictures show electrolytic capacitors held in place with assembly glue, and that maybe have some electrolyte leakage. The former has turned out to be corrosive in some manufacturers' products; the latter is corrosive. In either case, you need to remove all the glue or dried electrolyte, resolder all damaged solder connections in the vicinity, and replace any components whose leads have been dissolved by the corrosive. If the capacitors have leaked, they'll need to be replaced too, even if their leads haven't corroded.
     
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  4. pursang

    pursang New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Thank you musichal and Dave Voorhis for your input, since I have zero experience with these small circuit boards along with all that corrosion I will probably look into having it fixed, oh well it's been a good 30 years !
     
  5. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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  6. msskks

    msskks AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Murphy, TX
    Ah, a fine piece of equipment. I retired mine this year. The tuner had gone flaky a year ago, and then it started having audio issues (frequency response and volume fluctuations). Both point to capacitors going bad, and while the darn thing has sentimental value (Christmas gift, my first real piece of audio, teen years and all), I couldn't justify spending time or money on 80's low dollar electronics that may not last much after the repair and I didn't want to risk any of my speakers at that point, either. It's still in the garage, as I can't bear to recycle it yet, but I doubt it's got any future here.
     

     

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  7. blhagstrom

    blhagstrom Mad Scientist, fixer. Subscriber

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    Clean the controls with deoxit.

    Take a pick and pick off the dried glue around those caps and other parts. If the glue hasn’t actually eaten through the leads, it will run fine.

    It does look like the smaller cap is bulged on top. That may be a problem but if she works, run it.

    That vintage gear has almost no value.
    I just let one go on Ebay for $15 offer just to pass it on. Shipping probably costs more than that.

    There are so many 80s and 90s stereos floating around dirt cheap that repairing one is either a labor of love or the unit has special sentimental value.

    Much of the 80s and after stereos are fine units. But once the stopped wrapping the electronics in aluminum and glass and wood, they seemed cheaper. Plastic knobs and buttons didn’t have the look and feel of the machined aluminum.

    With the end of the stereo wars, 80 pound receivers were just too damn expensive to make and ship. Smaller, lighter electronics and light chassis and plastic became the norm. Custom IC was the rage and that quickly made them difficult to repair. Once they started to add video channels thing started to get more complicated inside.
     

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