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New silkscreening on faceplates?

Discussion in 'Marantz Audio' started by Steven Tate, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

    Messages:
    334
    You can also take that CAD model to a machine shop and have them CNC mill a new faceplate, including the lettering. With that model, you can make as many faceplates as you like. Take them to a plating shop afterwards and have them clear anodized.
     
  2. bberkom

    bberkom AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Yep, it'd probably be easier in the end to create a new factplate than refurb an existing one completely just because of the order of the steps of the complete manufacturing process.
     
  3. KingBubba

    KingBubba "Too Much Stuff" Subscriber

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    Location:
    Brooksville, Fl.
    I am thinking out loud here, but could it not have been done at the factory in the following way? Engrave the plate first followed by filling the engrave with the enamel. At this point could it not have been sent to have the surface ground and then anodized. I know nothing about anodize; so I cannot say what it would do to the surface of the enamel. If anodizing had no effect on the enamel, then some process would have to happen to the enamel to make it liquefy away the scratches from grinding.

    A process that an inventor friend of mine used to create applications and protection for marine use was to liquefy abs plastic with acetone to create an enamel like substance that he would paint on items he was trying to seal away from salt water exposure. Any over splash or drips could easily be cleaned up with acetone. He would look for old appliances and break of the plastic covers to use to make his substance. I'm not sure if this idea would be feasible for your project, but I thought I would throw it out for consideration.

    Another thought was the use of a small insulin type needle to be the method of application into the engraving, either with enamel or the abs. The question would be whether the solvent in the enamel or the abs would melt the syringe body.

    These ideas might seem hair brained, but I'm not worried if you tell me I'm a nut. Good luck on a very difficult project.
     
  4. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

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    334
    The engraved faceplates do not have enamel. Maybe enamel paint, but not enamel coatings like on your bathtub or police badges (a cloisonne process). Also, the aluminum was most likely put through a machine like a "Timesaver" to make the straight grain finish, then plated (anodized). Marantz most likely bought the chassis and faceplates from a sheet metal company, changed vendors, resulting in the different faceplates. The engraved faceplates were more expensive to produce and most likely resulted in Marantz using the silk screened/anodized faceplates.

    Many plating shops have gone under for environmental and health reasons and it just cost too much to be in the business.. A process called alodine involves hexavalent chrome (bad for the environment), and many plating processes while very effective for the engineering/design intent, used cadmium and arsenic, both very bad for human health, even in ppm and ppb amounts.

    http://www.kaehr.com/hard-anodizing.cfm

    http://timesaversinc.com/solutions/metal-solutions

    The USA still manufactures many products, including electronics (many aerospace and defense companies are mandated to manufacture in the USA, mainly for security reasons), but because of the strict environmental, safety and health requirements, it has become more expensive than sending the work overseas.
     
  5. wlhd1610

    wlhd1610 Penny and her new friend Subscriber

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    Location:
    upstate new york
    Late to the party,I know(but I'm hanging out here at my own in Myrtle Beach with Jimmy Buffett).
    What you guys are trying to figure out is exactly what our own TMZ2 had been doing now for several years .
    Short memories?

    Back to the bar.....

    Bob
     
    bryans12v likes this.
  6. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

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    334
    Keep drinking...

    I've been saying that someone should make a CAD model and laser engrave these faceplates- and lo and behold- someone has done it. Now, if you can get people to pay for it, that's another thing.

    The real trick will be to produce the clear anodized reproduction faceplates and sell them at a price that won't cost what the whole receiver or amp is worth. I know how, do you?
     
  7. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    1,845
    Location:
    Burleson, TX
    So, he restores engraved faceplates? I've seen his new ones with the laser etching. They are beautiful. If I could get an engraved one, or mine could be refurbished, I would be in line for that. Here are a few pics. Read 'em and weep. :eek:

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  8. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

    Messages:
    334
    Steven Tate- find a sheet metal shop that has a Timesaver or similar machine, have them put that faceplate through it and send it out for clear anodize. Buy one of these and fill the engraving, spray a coat of clear acrylic and your faceplate will be like new. You don't have any huge chunks or gashes.
     
    Steven Tate likes this.
  9. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

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    334
  10. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

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    334
  11. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Burleson, TX
    Thanks Trojan4life. I'll do some looking around. The other thing I would need to get it close to original would be some champagne anodizing. There is a shop in this area that advertises being able to anodize in most colors. I'm trying to decide if it's worth it to restore this face or give up and get a new laser etched one.
     
  12. Trojan4Life

    Trojan4Life Active Member

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    334
  13. 357sig

    357sig New Member

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    Last edited: Mar 10, 2017
    rxonmymind likes this.
  14. Wildcat

    Wildcat ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ Subscriber

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    Location:
    SCS, MI (near a lake)
    Not Marantz, but I was looking at a couple of C-J monoblocks that have scarred faceplates (they have a few nasty gouges), and figured someone around AK might have the ability to recreate new ones and then have them gold anodized. It's pretty simple really--they would need only one cutout for a power switch, and the company name/logo etched onto it. Even if the existing faceplates could be machined down deep enough and returned to the original anodized color, that would work.

    So I'll be lurking here, absorbing information... ;)
     
  15. Bourbon

    Bourbon Drinkin' and dreamin' Subscriber

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    629
    Location:
    LA - Lower Arkansas
    Interesting read. I've got a 3650 preamp that I'd love to spruce up a bit with a new faceplate as well. I'll keep an eye on this thread.
     
  16. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Burleson, TX
    I managed to make contact with Tony (TMZ2), and had a very informative conversation with him. For several reasons, a full rehab of an engraved faceplate is problematic -not impossible, but likely very expensive. He gets his faceplates made in bundles of at least thirty, and holds orders until he gets enough to take to the companies involved in the process. His laser etching machine can etch into the metal as much as the operator wants (more power, slower passes) for a price. The next time he does a run, I think I'm going to get a deeply etched faceplate of a different color -- maybe black, maybe bronze. I'll keep the original faceplate to sell with the unit if I should ever decide to sell it, and I may keep researching for reasonable methods to rehab it. So for now, that's the plan. :D
     
    j31088 likes this.
  17. Wildcat

    Wildcat ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,212
    Location:
    SCS, MI (near a lake)
    It makes me wonder if I couldn't get a gouged faceplate machined down, anodized in the correct color, then have it laser-etched (or whatever it takes to reapply the logo). That would be less fuss than a replica machined from scratch.
     
  18. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Burleson, TX
    Here's the problem according to Tony. All Marantz face printing does not match exactly. With an engraved face, the odds of having an artwork file exactly match your engraving is slim. And getting a new file of your specific plate is expensive. Also, engraved (actually stamped) faces are different depths. Some are deep and some are shallow. Mine happens to be fairly shallow. Taking a few thousandths off and re brushing can leave you with little engraving. Again, none of this makes it impossible. But in a one-off situation, the cost can rise above any potential value of the unit. Also, no single business seems to do all of the steps needed, and most of these businesses deal in orders of thousands. Most are not interested in working on one faceplate. It's certainly not impossible, but borders on the impractical.
     
  19. Marantz3650

    Marantz3650 Active Member

    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    Los Angeles, California
    5 places to make a faceplate......

    Metal supply
    Laser cutting shop
    Woodworking shop (Drum sanding machine with auto feed on bed)
    Anodizing shop
    Silk-screen printing shop

    I'll think about that for my two 510Ms in the future....I'm too busy now.
     
  20. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Burleson, TX
    That's pretty much what Tony said, and in each case, you have to find a shop willing to do a one off. For most businesses, it just isn't worth the setup effort to do one, or they charge what it's worth, which puts the total job more than most can justify.
     

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