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Old SLR Cameras Value?

Discussion in 'Cameras and Photography' started by AudioWizard, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. AudioWizard

    AudioWizard AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Going through some of my late dads stuff. I found a box of older SLR's and other Cameras. I have no knowledge when it comes to cameras, so thought I would ask here. Is there any value in old Olympus OM-1, OM-2, OM-G, various lens( must of liked Olymplus), Also I found a Pentex Auto 110 Kit, looks like a mini SLR, real cute, it has various lens, etc.
     

     

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  2. w1jim

    w1jim I can fix it but good... Subscriber

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    Some value, just like stereo gear condition is everything especially since many of these are bought for their collectivity rather than utility.
    Check ebay sold listings for value.
     
  3. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    We can't talk money here so I'll give you this...

    OM 1s and 2s are in a bit of demand as always as they are good cameras, the lenses as well. People like to get ahold of the Pentax 110 kits and they came in different packaging from a cardboard box to a suitcase.

    The best thing to do is to search on eBay for the going value. Some things change the value, condition and if it's been serviced and working. You might see listing saying CAL, meaning cleaned and lubricated and was checked out that it all functions.

    Things that will make the equipment junk, look in the battery compartment and see if there is a leaky battery in the cameras. Take the lenses and open the apiture up on them and shine a flashlight though them to see if they have any mold.
     
  4. hjames

    hjames dancing madly backwards ... Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    12,057
    Location:
    VA near DC
    Don't try to sell them right away, do your research! Look up what you have on eBay and see
    what they go for over the next 4-6 months ...
    Take some notes and remember - look at SOLD prices, not ASKING prices.
    Also - a lot may be somewhat Market driven -
    Prices in DC may be different than Reno may be different than LA may be different than NYC ...
     
    Celt likes this.
  5. dzkfraser

    dzkfraser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    797
    Location:
    Syracuse NY
    The old Zuiko lenses are very good and can be adapted fairly easily for use on DSLRs, I have several that I use on my Canon SL-1 and actually prefer the Olympus lenses over the ones that came in the kit
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2018
  6. jbailey930

    jbailey930 AK Member Subscriber

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    I am a Nikon guy with FE and couple of F3's. Check out www.keh.com for comps on retail pricing. They will offer about 40% less than retail on their quotes.
     

     

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  7. AudioWizard

    AudioWizard AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Thanks so much for the info. I will do a full inventory(I just did a quick glance) and check the completed prices on Ebay.
     
    4-2-7 likes this.
  8. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    one of the only ways to recoup your investment is to keep the camera body with the best
    possible lens. for example, any Canon SLRs would be better off with the f1.2 then the f1.4
    and lastly the f1.8 ( there was a canon 50mm? f2 - somewhat rare). same for the others.

    one of the best places to sell is at the film courses at various schools. they require a brand
    name SLR (canon, Nikon) in at least good working condition. and folks will pay up to
    an entry level Canon rebel. and film of course. they make you do the develop, stop-bath,
    an fixer thing.
     
  9. onepixel

    onepixel .

    Messages:
    34,102
    Location:
    Maui
    I have an Olympus OM-1 and OM-2n. Both bought new back in the late 70s. Great cameras. I think most of the value will be in the lenses. Olympus made and are still making great glass. Those can be used on some modern digital cameras with an adaptor. The camera bodies themselves will most likely need some kind of refurbishing to work at 100%.
     
  10. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    617
    I'd say most, if not all, of your lenses can be used on mirrorless digital cameras with an adapter. Don't sell your self short if someone says film is dead, there's still plenty of people out there shooting it.
     
  11. AudioWizard

    AudioWizard AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Reno, NV
    So do the old SLR Olympus lens with the adapter only work on the Olympus mirrorless digital cameras or will they work other makes?
     

     

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  12. 4-2-7

    4-2-7 Smart Ass Sponsor Subscriber

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    Well once you look at adaptors you'll be able to see what cameras they can work on. So they will work on cameras they make adaptors for.

    Some new digital cameras work better with old manual lenses, and some old manual lenses are a better choice with certain cameras

    I know that Pentax works really good on Canon Digital cameras as well a Pentax digital bodies. In fact sometimes the manual Pentax lens works a lot better and easier on the Digital Canon.

    It all depends on the quality of the adaptor to override some things that the digital body is asking for form a lens thats attached to it. It can get complicated. It's not like you can do any of this and have a point and shoot system. An old lens is going to make one work at taking a photo like back in the day of film and manual lenses.
     
  13. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I have mounted Konica, canon, pentax, Minolta lens on the Olympus mirrorless bodies.

    I think the Sony Alphas have a thinner lens flange to film plane. so they can potentially
    handle more lens. there are sites that lists the body flange distances and most brands
    of lenses, then you can decide which body and then which lenses fit.

    to add to 4-2-7's input, bodies with in body stabilization (Canons don't or didn't which why I skipped them
    even though I was a Canon junkie) need to have the body configured for the lens' focal length to
    optimize the stabilization. you will need to do this for long lenses to be able to manually focus the
    lens since the image will be hard to focus - shaky hands, slow eyes, fast moving subjects,...

    then the only issues left are how the mating lens mount and/or lens itself deals with stopping down.
    some pentax adapters push in the stop down pin so its a matter of moving the lens' f-stops.
    I recall Canon has a manual switch on their lenses. as do others but check each lens
    looking for a "A" for automatic then moving it off "A" then you can then manually set
    the f-stop.
     
  14. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    617
    I agree with what has been said above.
    You need to google the lenses you have and find out more about them.
    I use Nikon and Minolta and an old Canon lens on my Sony Nex-7 and A7ii, so can't really speak to the Oly lenses.
    There are adapters to use just about any lens on any camera now days.
     
  15. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    617
    Here's an example of what can be done today.
    This is my Sony A7ii with a TechArtPro adapter, which uses Leica M mounts, a Leica thread (LTM) to Leica M mount adapter and a Nikkor 5cm 1.4 LTM lens.
    When I tell the camera it has a 50mm lens on it via the stabilization menu, I get an auto focusing, image stabilized camera that is using a mid-50's made lens on a 24 meg camera.
    DSC05601 (Large).JPG
    I really enjoy being able to use this old lens on a digital camera since I can't afford to shoot film.
     
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  16. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    auto-focus? how does the sony "drive" the focus mount since Nikon lens and
    others rotate in different directions?
     

     

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  17. Old Ears too

    Old Ears too Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't 'drive' the lens, you set the lens at infinity and it then moves the whole lens in-out until the camera says it is in focus. Very ingenious system that makes use of the in-camera phase detection focus system.
    Makes all my old manual focus lenses auto focus if I use the TAP adapter. I don't use it much though since I find I'm more involved with taking the picture if I have to focus it myself.
     
  18. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    aha - the TAP adapter. not part of a sony camera - so extra bucks on top of the pricey Alpha.
    and probably one adapter per lens mount.

    good to know.
     
  19. AudioWizard

    AudioWizard AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Thanks for all the info, learning a lot. So, depending on the lens, they might be worth hanging on to and getting a mirrorless camera and the proper adapter, correct? Any make recommendations for the adapters? Hopefully this week I will do an inventory and report back.
     
  20. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    you need to decide how much to spend on a camera body. the Sony line is usually over 600 for
    a bottom of their line kit, the Olympus line is generally under.

    the alpha flange to film plane is 1.25mm less than the Olympus/Panasonic m43 specs so the
    theory is that the alpha can handle more lenses but this is only useful if you have or want
    lenses that the Olympus can't handle.

    since its your first entry into adapted lenses I'd advise to start cheap. couple of reasons,
    you get used to manual lenses, then require more "features" then you can simply sell off
    the body, even switch brands. this keeps the lenses. you can find older Olympus bodies
    for under $100 and even the original Sony NEX line.

    I've had the l1, gf1, pl1, pm1, and now use PL5, I also had dozens of lens and am down
    to 5.

    as far as adapters, the early ones were cheaper than they are today but today's adapters
    seem to be better built. they will generally work and any "problems" with be with lens
    focus at infinity not being exactly at infinity. if it goes past then backoff or simply use the
    hyperfocal setting that grabs everything from infinity to closer.

    for some lens mounts it is better to use several (cheaper) ones. for example, it is painful to
    unscrew a pentax screw mount from the adapter - just buy an extra and that pentax mount
    lens becomes a bayonet. the other painful adapter is the canon FD adapter which is
    designed around the complex original-breech-now-bayonet mount that I've found,
    refuses to unmounts the canon lens.

    there's some innovation out there. I have this adapter with a lens element that reduces
    the focal length and f-stop --> a 50mm f1.4 becomes a 35mm f1.0 lens. soft wide open
    like a 1920s portrait lens but great for midnight shots of black cats in a coal bin by
    star light.

    no matter what you decide, its much more fun than the old film days.
     

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