One of the best WWII documentaries I've seen...aviation oriented.

Discussion in 'Wheels, Wings, Mud, and Water' started by BigElCat, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. kray

    kray HE>i Subscriber

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    Thanks for sharing. i'm not even in my mid 40's yet but fascinated by all things WWII, probably due to my grandfather fighting in it.

    In my limited knowledge, it's crazy all the things that ended up going the allies ways toward the end. which could have easy fell the other way :no:
     

     

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  2. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    I've a 1917 Western Electric radiophone receiver as used in these primitive warbirds in my collection. I can only imagine the context of it's use a hundred years ago whenever I look at it.
    20131208_082400.jpg
     
  3. 2011etec

    2011etec Super Member

    Very cool.Does it or can it function?What kind of collection do you have?Military,radios?
     
  4. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    I'm assuming it could, if the missing cartridge resistors were replaced and powered up.
    Quite an assortment of stuff, too many to list tho' modest. Ranging from a couple WW-2 military to 1920s and later to Crystal sets and a few horn speakers, the WW-1 WE is the premier piece.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019 at 9:01 PM
  5. onwardjames

    onwardjames Hoardimus Maximus Subscriber

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    It's amazing to be an ace in a P-51D.

    It's an altogether different scenario to be flying what is essentially a weaponized kite. My love goes out to Frank Luke, who was an impossibly bad ass badass. Read this -

    Luke's final flight took place during the first phase of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. On September 28, after achieving his 14th and 15th victories, he landed his SPAD XIII at the French aerodrome at Cicognes where he spent the night, claiming engine trouble.[5] When he returned to the 1st Pursuit Group's base at Rembercourt the next day, he was confronted by Captain Alfred A. Grant, his squadron's commanding officer (C.O.). Despite being under threat of arrest by Grant for being AWOL, Luke took off without authorization and flew to a forward airbase at Verdun, where his sympathetic group commander, Major Hartney, canceled the arrest order and gave Luke tacit approval to continue his balloon hunting.[5] That evening Luke flew to the front to attack three balloons in the vicinity of Dun-sur-Meuse, six miles behind the German lines. He first dropped a message to a nearby U.S. balloon company, alerting them to observe his imminent attacks. Luke shot down the enemy balloons but was then severely wounded by a single machine gun bullet fired from a hilltop above him, a mile east of the last balloon site he had attacked.[1] Luke landed in a field just west of the small village of Murvaux—after strafing a group of German soldiers on the ground—near the Ruisseau de Bradon, a stream leading to the Meuse River. Although weakened by his wound, he made his way toward the stream, intending to reach the cover of its adjacent underbrush, but finally collapsed some 200 meters from his airplane. Approached by German infantry, Luke drew his Colt Model 1911 pistol and fired a few rounds at his attackers before dying. Reports that a day later his body was found with an empty gun and a bullet hole in his chest, with seven dead Germans in front of him were proven erroneous.[1] According to author Skinner, the fatal bullet, fired from the hilltop machine gun position, had entered near Luke's right shoulder, passed through his body, and exited from his left side.

    RESPECT.
     
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  6. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Addicted Member

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    I too would also like to feel the rush of the noise/wind in my face, but it had better be a good day to fly. Those old biplanes were so underpowered and unpredictable.

    Just a random thought this day.

    Q
     

     

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  7. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    Having flown in ultralights, one is very much beholden to winds and weather in these things.
     
  8. E.Man

    E.Man Super Member

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    Having Hitler over rule deployment decisions helped the allies.
    ME 262 could have been in service much earlier.
     
  9. dana1962

    dana1962 New Member

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    The SPAD XIII with the 220hp Hiso is the same size and weight as my Great Lakes but with 40 more hp. Speeds are very close to the same as well. Granted the flying qualities of my GL may be more civilized it still shows how advances in aviation were made in just 3 or 4 years during a war.
     
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  10. Hyperion

    Hyperion Roobarb & Custard Subscriber

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    It already is - check out 'Reach For The Sky' ;)

    Here https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049665/

    Talking of British WW2 Aces - ever heard of John 'Cat's Eyes' Cunningham ? ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 9:07 AM
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  11. Quadman2

    Quadman2 Addicted Member

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    Ah yes, "The Red Baron"...Snoopy's arch enemy.:D

    This German flyer of WWI was the top air ace, Allies included, with 80 kills. He was a clever strategist with one intent in mind as it was reported. However, war propaganda made the most of his feats in sky at the time.

    He came into the war as a dedicated Prussian aristocrat with riding skills due to his extensive hunting. But the modern war tech changed the use of the cavalry, so he joined the fledgling German air force at the time. Within a short time he had honed his skills as a deadly flyer, one that was to be respected for his ability in a dogfight.

    After reading his diary, which he thought was on the arrogant side, (it comes off this way), he received a grazed head shot in an encounter with a Brit, suffering severe headaches thereafter. Toward the end of WWI, while flying low over some Australian trenches, a machine gunner opened up, with a Canadian plane blasting away behind Von Richthofen...and he was hit by a single bullet. The Red Knight managed to land his plane, but was dead when the French soldiers got to him.

    To this day, there's controversy as to who fired that fateful shot. However, the ballistics people say that the angle of the bullet indicated that the score should have gone to the Ozzies, but I think the Canuck claimed this kill. What I did find strange was, four funerals were eventually held in Manfred's honour. He was honoured by three countries.

    Anyways, just a thought for the day.

    Q
     

     

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  12. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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    Sweet we have it for free. Full length. Good video quality.
     
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  13. dana1962

    dana1962 New Member

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    The "Gull" wings primary benefit was first to intersect the round fuselage at 90 degrees so as to obtain the lowest drag. Second to shorten the gear legs so they could be fitted between the wings spars and being shorter allows the legs to withstand carrier use without excess weight. Vintage aircraft pilot and engineering geek here.
     
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  14. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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    You guys really ought to watch this; it's 2 hr. 10. min long (don't believe the 3 plus hour marker).

    Muriel Pavlow, the female lead, passed away just 3 weeks ago, at the age of 97.

    She was a bonafide fox when the movie was made in 1956.

    The special effects are pretty good regarding Captain Bader's missing legs. Not sure how they did it.
     
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  15. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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  16. Tom Brennan

    Tom Brennan AK Member

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    That would’ve then prompted the British and Americans to push production of the jets they had waiting in the wings. So there would’ve had hordes of jets rolling off American and British assembly lines rather than hordes of Mustangs, Spitfires, Typhoons and Thunderbolts.
     

     

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  17. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    This is just one example of Hitler's dictatorial know-it-all incompetence undercutting his vision of a "Thousand Year Reich". Twelve years of World-wide devastating disruption, and a costly legacy of lessons soon disregarded and forgotten to show for it.
     
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  18. sanford12

    sanford12 Old Stuff New Stuff As long as it's Good Stuff Subscriber

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    My favorite is "A Fighter Pilots Story" It's about a P47 pilot. I saw it once on PBS. A highly moving story well told. He described about how a buddy's plane was slowly going down but too low to jump. When he said that before his friend went into the trees he looked up at him and waved goodbye I was weepy eyed. The family sells the DVD and it takes a bit of searching to find them.

    Here's a little bit of the documentary.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019 at 6:53 PM

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