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Removing oil from my Thorens TD 124 Mk I platter bearings

Discussion in 'Turntables' started by kjack48230, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. kjack48230

    kjack48230 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Grosse Pointe, MI
    Hello all, I'm in the process of restoring my Thorens TD 124 Mk I and have been reading up on a lot of expert advice and opinions on the process. I'm at a point where I need to clean the sintered bronze bearings for the platter.

    I've heard you need to heat up the bearings in the oven, is that correct? If so, what is the step by set process. do I need to pull the bearing out of the well? Any help would greatly be appreciated. Thanks.
     

     

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  2. heyraz

    heyraz AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Long Branch, NJ
    You really can't clean them installed, and I'm not sure they even need to be cleaned unless an oil with additives (detergent oil) was used.
    If so, you might as well replace them.

    Are you sure they're Sintered Bronze (Oilite)?
    Those would be bronze colored.
    The earlier versions of the MKI used Nylatron bushings (black colored), which I think should be replaced.
     
  3. PabloX

    PabloX AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    299
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Soaking in solvent is also a method for getting oil out of bearings like that. You'd obviously need to remove the bearings first.
     
  4. savatage1973

    savatage1973 Addicted Member

    Messages:
    6,002
    Location:
    NW Pennsylvania snow belt
    I concur that soaking in a solvent would work well for cleaning--not only for removing old oil, but also particulate matter embedded in the "pores" of the bearing surface. However, I would follow-up with a good soaking in fresh lubricant (maybe even with a little heat) so fully saturate the bearing material--for you cooking folks, kind of like seasoning or re-seasoning cast iron cookware.
     
  5. maxhifi

    maxhifi AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,868
    Location:
    Edmonton Alberta Canada
    Unless there's a problem, I would just add non detergent oil to lubricate it. My TD-124/II has never had the platter bearing sleeve removed, but has always been kept lubricated, and it takes over a minute to spin down when you shut it off. If yours is operating smoothly, and takes a long time to spin down, I think messing with it may do more harm than good.

    The motor bearings on the other hand should probably be removed, and baked out. I bought a new set for mine from Italy, but have yet to install.
     
  6. PabloX

    PabloX AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    299
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I have a small electric heater that blows a lot of air. It works very well for drying things like that.
     

     

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  7. kjack48230

    kjack48230 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Grosse Pointe, MI
    Thanks, I just picked up a toaster over from a GW for 8 bucks. I can do all my "Cooking" with that. I did the timing test before I started tearing things apart, the spin down was barely 45 seconds, I'm also replacing the bearings as well as the coils in the E50 motor. The model was after the bearing change, they are the sintered bronze. The coils though are before they made the change to the E50 motor, slightly thicker gauge wire was used in the windings to produce better torque at startup. Got most of my parts from our favorite Italian. I'll do a change on the oil and bottom plastic part that the main ballbearing rests on and see how it spins down after that, if it's still slow, I'll press them out and clean them. Worst case I'll have Simone send me another pair.
     
  8. heyraz

    heyraz AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Long Branch, NJ
    How long does it take for your platter to drop to the bottom after you've re-inserted it?
    When my 124 had the Nylatron bushings, it (literally) took forever.
    After replacing the Nylatron bushings with sintered bronze bushings, it was about a minute.
    Simone told me I didn't have to pre-treat (boil them in oil) his new bushings.
     
  9. kjack48230

    kjack48230 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Grosse Pointe, MI
    I don't really know, I never timed it. It'll be another thing to check when I put everything back together.
     
  10. gadget73

    gadget73 junk junkie Subscriber

    Messages:
    36,575
    Location:
    Southern NJ
    The way I've done that sort of bushing before is to heat it in order to cook out the oil. To re-lube it, put it in a jar of the appropriate oil and pull a vacuum on it. They don't really re-lube effectively without the vacuum. Mason jars, jelly jars, whatever will work. Just drill and JB-weld a vacuum port on top and use a hand vacuum pump.Its kinda cool to watch, you'll see an explosion of tiny bubbles in the oil as the air pulls out.

    I like sewing machine oil for this sort of thing, but any reasonably lightweight non-detergent oil will get it done.

    but realistically unless they are currently completely dry or gummed up, just wiping them with a Q-tip dipped in mineral spirits or similar solvent then adding some fresh oil is fine.
     
  11. WntrMute2

    WntrMute2 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,733
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    I just contacted Simone afew days ago and he said the main bearings we're not available from him. Just what is listed on his website. There is a whole bearing assembly from Snopper for around a thousand bucks. Yikes.

    I am beginning my rebuild so I'll be watching your progress carefully.
    What are you planning on using for lubricant on the linkages?
     

     

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  12. kjack48230

    kjack48230 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Grosse Pointe, MI
    I contacted a gentleman from the EU. He sold me the right oil for the spindle well for all three of my Thorens, I have the TD 124 Mk I, obviously, a TD 124 Mk II, and a TD 160 Super. I'm also going to build my own Plinth, got a full work shop in the garage. If you want one, let me know, it's easier to make more than one per project.
     
  13. WntrMute2

    WntrMute2 AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,733
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    Ummm.....hell yes!
    I'll send you a PM
     

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