Restore Marantz 2226B

Discussion in 'Marantz Audio' started by Noel Bilbro, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    [​IMG]

    I reveived this Marantz 2226B for a good deal. I have decent enough experience soldering to PCB(making keyboards) so I think I could do a recap. I realize no one is going to hold my hand through the entire process but, I am quite lost when it comes to what brands/types to use for what and where the best place to source them. I anticipate it being a somewhat lengthy process. I don't expect to do it in an evening. I'll probably do one section at a time. Maybe amp and power supply, then preamp section, then maybe phono. I have some cleaner and lube and have researched enough to know what I am doing with that. Could anyone give me some pointers?
     

     

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  2. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    2,808
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    Mouser and Digikey are two of the main sources for quality parts. Hopefully you can find a cap list somewhere for that unit. You will need a service manual, which you likely can get from Hifiengine.com (free membership required). By all means, build a Dim Bulb Tester to use every time you power the unit up after working on a section. It can save your bacon if there is a short or some other problem inadvertently introduced by your work. Also, if you haven't already, read this thread by Echowars where he tells you the tools you will need to work on audio gear. The first two items are the most expensive and are not needed for a recap of a working unit.

    http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/in...udio-gear-eh-heres-the-tools-you-need.333423/
     
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  3. Jailtime

    Jailtime Standin' on a corner Subscriber

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    akdatabase.org will have the service manual also. Panasonic FC are good for power supply use, Elna Silmic II or Nichicon FG for audio, like the preamp and phono boards. Good idea to test after each board you have rebuilt, makes it easy to troubleshoot if you have problems.

    There's no cap list for 2226B in the AK Database, but that one should be easy to take a look and build your own list. Good access to all the boards in it.
     
  4. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    Yes, I have the service manual and it lists every part including caps. Thanks for the tips and info.
     
  5. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    The service manual has the caps listed along with every other part. Is that the capacitor list I should use?
     
  6. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    2,808
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    You should compare board by board with the manual parts list. Occasionally the board will have a different value from the SM list. If it does, and if you think everything looks original, go with the value on the board. That means physically Check each board against the parts list before ordering. Modern caps are generally smaller and better. In most cases, increase the voltage rating by one step: 16v go to 25v. 25v go to 35v, etc. this will get caps closer to original size and be a little more robust. Keep the capacitance the same unless you see a recommendation by a trusted tech on AK to increase the value.
    Also, Check and note cap polarity against the board silkscreen. Marantz is notorious for having one or two silkscreens reversed. If you empty a board and replace the caps by the silkscreen, you might have one go pop and take some things with it.
     

     

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  7. Mike Sweeney

    Mike Sweeney AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I just finished one of these babies. Sounds great when done. I'll write up some notes that I found as I went along. Right now I'm on my phone so writing alot is a challenge :)
     
  8. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    Wow, that would be great. Thanks
     
  9. Mike Sweeney

    Mike Sweeney AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Orange CA
    The first choice to make is to buy all the caps yourself from Digikey or get a prepackaged kit. The kits are more expensive but if you dont place to make a hobby out of this, then they are an easy way to go. You can get a complete cap kit for the 2226B for about 60 dollars with the nice Nichicon Gold audio caps and another 20 bucks for the two filtering caps of the same make. Now, you can buy the two filtering caps for 6 bucks each from digikey (plus or mins a few depending on brand)...but it's convinent to have a small package show up ready to go :) That was how I started before I decided I liked this as a hobby and stocked up on parts. What you dont get with the kit are any repalcements of electrolyitcs with WIMA films for example. Another choice is how far down the rabbit hole do you want to go with the caps. Some just replace with like, some like to upgrade a bit ( slightly more capacitance on the filters for example) and some like to buy high end coupling caps. I would suggest doing the like for like with a couple of changes.. The two primary filter caps are 6800uf at 63 volts.. I went with 8200uf at 80 volts. I did buy some diodes ( 1N4444 and 1N4448) to replace a few but in the end, the original tested good and I couldnt find any real reason to pull them. I also bought a TIP31B for Q750 on the P700 board. That is a 2SD330 and TIP31B is the more rugged replacement. That one you need to decide how much work you want to do. It's mounted to the main heat sink and it's a bit of work to get out if you dont plan on cleaning up or replacing the main amplifer transistors. Most dont replace it unless it's bad or showing signs of instablity.

    The tone board is a PIA to do. you can get to about half the caps without removing it but ultimately you need to unscrew the nuts on the pots, take out the power siwtch, remove the speaker switch rails ( the extensions), remove the chassis screws on the power switch side and loosen them on the other and then gentle pry and twist the board out from behind the chassis. you can can just enough movement to get 90 degrees of twist with caution. That means you can get to all the caps. There are some non-polarized electrolyitcs in middle of the board.. replace those with some WIMA films. Dont worry about the two big brown .22uf 50 volt caps under the volume. They are pretty durable as I found out :/ My cheap replacements didnt work out well at all. Speaking of which, dont get cheap imported shit.. get brand name or buy from a known supplier like Mouser, Digikey etc. I went cheap for a few and regreted it.

    Dont just replace the power switch because everyone does it. The OEM is really good quality and rebuildable if the contacts are not fried. It's worth a look before you hack it out. The trick is to use a very thin blade to GENTLY pry the wings up and over the studs on the sides. Get a relay burnishing tool and some deOxit and clean the contacts. Then get some Deoxit L260DNp Mechanical and Electrical Grease and put a dab into each of the contacts. The grease is non conducting and has DeOxit in it to keep things clean plus lubed. Push the ears slightly together and then re-assemble making sure the spring doesnt get pinched in the gap. Works fine.. lasts long time :)

    You will need a stock of DeOxit cleaner spray.. and I use DeOxit fader lube afterwards for the pots. These are 40 years old and even clean, they are worn so a bit of lube doesnt hurt.
    Do NOT DeOxit the tuning cap on the tuner board. it's an air gap unit and the spray screws up the capacitence. I use a electrical contact cleaner that dries off completely after some canned air to blow out the dust bunnies. I put a drop of electrically safe lube on the bearings/gears but it's a very small amount. I would suggest that no-lube is an option since very few of us actively look for radio stations every day like we use to. And the oil just attracts dust. Something to think about.

    I use Kesters active rosin solder, their no clean flux in a squeeze bottle, solder braid/wick ( I hate hand solder sucking tools) and weller iron with a wedge tip that can really put out the heat for fast melting/removal but it does require a deft hand or you will lift copper from the board. I have yet to lift any pads but then I've been using this iron for years. If you new to soldering/desoldering.. buy some junk radios or whatever and practice your de-soldering skills first. It's worth the time and a few bucks in materials before you attack your Marantz :)

    A small LED flastlight is invaluable for lighting the dark corners while working

    With light corrosion on the RCA jacks, you can buff it off with some mothers mag polish by hand or with a dremel tool if it needs more persusion. Nasty cases can take some 0000 steel wool and care then polish

    Something to remember is there are ten ways to do most of this. And all ten work fine for the most part. What see here is what worked for me and that might change as I go along doing more restorations.

    Brands of caps I use.. Nichicon, Rubycon, Panasonic, Wima, "orange drop" .. these are driven by cost and by availablity. People swear by Nichicons but in the filter caps I dont see/hear a difference between them and the Rubycons for example. The Rubycons are cheaper, rated pretty much the same and built just as well from what I can see and test.

    I have pictures of most of this including rebuilding the power switch. I just havent posted them yet. And I'm sure I will remember more or someone will add more to this. :) Above all, have fun! it's not hard work but it can be a bit tedious at times.
     
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  10. Mike Sweeney

    Mike Sweeney AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
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    What I currently use for chemicals:
    DeOxit L260DWP non conductive grease with DeOxit
    CRC-3-36 Technical lubricant
    CRC 5103 Quick dry electrical cleaner
    5% DeOxit spray cleaner
    5% Fader Lube
    Kester 186 Flux No Clean ( get it off Ebay.. a gallon is 80 dollars and the min buy unless you get from a reseller)
     
  11. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    Wow, thanks so much for the post. Very helpful information. Any pics would be greatly appreciated. Also, do you have a link for that kit?
     

     

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  12. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    Thats a pretty serious list. I just used an off brand electronics cleaner. I plan on at least getting some type of lube
     
  13. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    I found this site. You think it's legit?

    http://www.audio-high-store.com/product/marantz-2226b-upgrade-kit-audio-capacitors/
     
  14. Steven Tate

    Steven Tate AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    2,808
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    N. Richland Hills, TX
    I have used Randy (AK member runningdog) at irebuildmarantz.com a few times for complete rebuild kits that include all caps, necessary semis, LED lights, velum....the whole 9 yards. He uses only top quality components. There are other places that have similar packages, but I can vouch that his stuff is good and he is available to give expert advice if you run into trouble.
    Steve
     
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  15. Mike Sweeney

    Mike Sweeney AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Orange CA
  16. Noel Bilbro

    Noel Bilbro New Member

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    I actually contacted him and he said that he doesn't plan on making a 2226b kit because he doesn't see many
     

     

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  17. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    suggestions

    parts list, dl service manual (and google/bing for all possible hits - I have a NAD unit that
    hifiengine AND electrotanya are both needed for completeness and clarity of doc).

    compare parts lists, with schematic, with board layout with your unit. all must be identical
    then using parts list against your unit (large pictures of each section is good) and measure
    the lead spacing (almost all caps of one value of one voltage have several construction
    material types, orientation (axial/radial), and polarity (polar, non-polar/bipolar) so this
    is important for two reasons

    one is if you stay with the most common denominator you can group all equivalent
    (value AND voltage) into a larger qty buy that allows you to go up one or more quality
    levels. two if you decide to up the eventual Sound Quality by going up the capacitor
    SQ ladder then you will need to get the caps that will fit into the through-holes. hence
    a watch on the lead spacing.

    most of the cost (90%) of the refresh/rebuild/recap from a professional (no not the
    ones the flippers go to) is in the labor about $50+ per hour and easily over 10 hours
    then doing it yourself and not going with a quality set of parts doesn't make sense.
    if money is an issue, there are bags of caps rated for higher voltages than most SS devices
    will see - is only under $10 except for the PS caps. Chinese of course that everyone trusts.

    but even if it's a one off, do the cap evaluation yourself. about 1-3 hours (I take
    lots of breaks for coffee, return of coffee to local environments, etc )

    and when you go to replace the caps - do one at a time
    1, unsolder and pull old cap, measure
    2. pull from labelled bag (digikey and mouser supply their caps in these)
    measure to ensure cap is from right bag AND matches #1 then solder in
    (cap measuring devices start at about $10 on ebay from china and beats
    weighing it for value detection)

    this one at a time - guarantees no mistakes, once its all done.
    last thing you want to do is to pull all the caps and willy-nilly put
    them back in, in random order, only one cap in the wrong place
    (and the other also in the other wrong place) and your device will signal aliens

    do not change orientation - sometimes the stenciling on the pcb, the schematic,
    the parts layout, are wrong. replace as is.

    or buy all non-polar caps and wire them in willy-nilly - no possible
    explosions. not wearing safety glasses? oops.

    lastly, for the next guy - do what hospitals, aircraft mechanics, and
    what the GIANTS of AK do, document the exact steps you took.

    even if its your first effort, take the parts list, number in the order each component
    is changed and any change made (upped/downed the cap value? upped/downed
    the voltage? wired in correctly/backwards? replace with better cap?)
    eg note the cap replacement value, voltage, and type (eg 10uf/16V polar Nichicon KZ)

    I'd pay more for a documented recap and I'd probably pay a lot less for
    an undocumented one (I'd add in my costs of undoing the damage
    if I could find it - see my thread on how to detect modded/f****d-up
    flipper crap).

    good luck and enjoy the music when you're done.
     
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  18. Mike Sweeney

    Mike Sweeney AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
    Orange CA
    Bob makes some very good points.. I'll add a few notes. One trick is to take a sharpie and put a dot on each cap facing the smae way. So when you pull it out and cant remember the orientation, just line the dot up with all the rest. I tend to take ALOT of phone pics. From different angles so I can see the wiring, labels etc. I tend to put screws and such into small cups and organize them a bit. Build a dim bulb tester.. simple and they cost just a few bucks but it can save your system if you get something seriously crossed up or shorted. I prefer Digikey myself.. and yes, they bag everything in it's own bag with a label.

    When I'm ready for a board, I pull out all the caps I need and stick them in groups into a piece of black antistatic foam I have. I keep this block next to me as I work and I dont need to digging for a bag. Being stuck into the foam makes it easy to see the labels and to grab.

    I do measure all my caps.. both when I pull them and put them in. I've gotten burned with the cheap imported crap on some films. The ESR tester I use was 20 bucks off ebay and works fine for what I'm doing with it. It will NOT measure leakage.. I have an old Heathkit that will do that. I also use a 10 dollar signal generator ( kit) for a 2-3 Khz signal to test audio and for adjustments. You are not where you need that yet.. and I would suggest making friends with someone locally who has a clue and an O scope :) Doesnt need to be fancy and honestly, I built one of the digital kits for 40 bucks just to see and it doesn work.. if not crudely.
    Paying attention to the silkscreen is good.. but not perfect. You need at least a cheap digital volt meter ( DVM) so you can check continuity, resistance and voltages if needed. Cheap is 30 bucks. Make sure to get some test leads with both clips and needle points.. and that the needle points have slipon shields that just leave the tip exposed. It's a sad day to slip with a probe and shoer something expensive out with the tip :eek:

    Tester
     
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  19. Bob

    Bob AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Location:
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    @Mike Sweeney is absolutely correct with the marking cap polarity.

    even if you switch to non-polars like nichicon ES/VP/EP, the next guy, more
    anal/obsessive than you/I, might want to revert back.

    and, of course, you run out of your favorite colored (ES is green and for 1 great reason)
    cap, you can substitute a polar back in.
     

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