Sansui G9000 and Tape Monitor pots cleaning....

Discussion in 'Exclusively Sansui' started by red71rum, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    I recently got my Sansui G9000 a couple of days ago. I had posted in Solid State, but figured I should have posted here. The prior owner claimed it had had a cleaning 3 years ago, but after blowing out several huge dust bunnies out of it with a Datacvac electric Duster, I doubt. He mentioned that sometimes the right channel would not come. I have found the culprit to be the Tape Monitor control. If I slightly wiggle it the right channel comes on fine. Now, I obviously had the top off earlier but found the pots, at least the volume and so on to be hidden under a board. Is the Tape Monitor easier to get to? Also what would be good to use to clean the grime off the faceplate as I don't want to damage silkscreening? DSC_9613-2.JPG
     
  2. LBPete

    LBPete Rolling Along Subscriber

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    10,522
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    The tape monitor is a switch, not a pot. Use Deoxit D5 to clean the controls but you have to get it inside each of the controls. It's very hard to do that without doing a lot of disassembly on this model. As far as the face plate, use a little Windex and a piece of old t-shirt material.

    Please post the serial number for the database. Click on the link in my signature block.

    - Pete
     
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  3. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    Could I try to just use some of my Deoxit D5 and spray in from the outside first(into the offending switch), would that be a bad idea? With my Sony STR V6, I of course could get a the pots more easily when taking off the cover. I will put the serial in your database.
     
  4. LBPete

    LBPete Rolling Along Subscriber

    Messages:
    10,522
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    It won't hurt anything to do that but it also won't do much to clean the contacts in the switch. Here's a picture of a G-8000 open for cleaning.

    G-8000.jpg

    - Pete
     
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  5. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    Well I had something kind of catastrophic happen.....I had sprayed deoxit in the various switches, and then was moving them back and forth. Well the selector knob came off in my hand! It looks like it had metal fatigue from all the use I guess.This has now gone way past my comfort zone. Do you guys know of anyone who could work on this for me? I live in the Clarksville TN area.
     
  6. KingBubba

    KingBubba "Too Much Stuff" Subscriber

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    Did the shaft break or was the problem with the knob? A pic would help.
     
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  7. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    Looks like the shaft, super depressing...I put the serial number in the database.

    20170604_123404[1].jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2017
  8. KingBubba

    KingBubba "Too Much Stuff" Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,472
    Location:
    Brooksville, Fl.
    Too bad it was the shaft. You could get by using a screwdriver. You might find a replacement on eBay or on the market here on AK. You have to be a subscriber on AK to have access, but it is well worth the cost. If it were me, I would live with it. Some people are more worried about having their stuff look just like new. All I worry about is how it sounds. You have a great piece there. Enjoy it.
     
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  9. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    Thanks, do you know of anyone who works on these in my area, TN? If I got the part I am not able to repair it, this is way out of my wheelhouse: ) I don't believe the indentation is deep enough to use a screwdriver. Would this work as a replacement, it is for a 9090?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sansui-9090...188278?hash=item4404ac7976:g:60wAAOSwuLZY3b2W
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2017
  10. lbcgav

    lbcgav AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    740
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    Brookfield WI
    No, that won't work. You'll need something that looks like this:
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. lbcgav

    lbcgav AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    Brookfield WI
    Actually, you'll probably have to purchase the whole mic. amp circuit board. It's F-2795. The tape monitor switch and the selector switch are soldered directly to that board.
     
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  12. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    Hopefully it is not made out of unobtainium....
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2017
  13. Finjima

    Finjima AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    568
    Location:
    Lake Helen Florida
    and save the knob! value 25 bucks. chances are the shaft was already damaged, nothing you could do would break that under normal conditions cleaning, unless your the Hulk! come on show us your green.
    You will find replacements for that. Down load the manual from here. https://www.hifiengine.com/manual_library/sansui/g-9000.shtml The 2795 board is common to both the G8000 and G9000 so you can buy the board form either reciever being parted out.
    In the meantime while your waiting for one to turn up
    For cleaning the face plate a magic eraser used with mean green cleaner will do wonders and is safe to use on print, scrub away. but be careful not to get anything on the dial face.
     
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  14. Kale

    Kale Super Member

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  15. Hipocrates

    Hipocrates AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    960
    Location:
    Costa Rica
    I fixed mine doing this; using and spare from some old junk and epoxy... not cute, but it works, and I did not have to deal with a fellow who sales ''vintage'' capacitors:whip:
    CIMG8811.JPG CIMG8816.JPG
     
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  16. Finjima

    Finjima AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    568
    Location:
    Lake Helen Florida
    that saves 50 bucks for a selector switch board
     
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  17. Finjima

    Finjima AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    568
    Location:
    Lake Helen Florida
    Kale I'm blown away with your work on pots and switch's. makes me itchy to tear into my 801. btw what kind of camera do you use to get such good close ups?
     
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  18. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    I have put the knob to the side, I have seen in the past that they are hard to come by. I have been going to the gym for over 20 years actually: ) But, the old guy I bought this from probably had already done damage to it because he mentioned he had to "wiggle" a switch sometimes. Thanks for the link to the manual, I believe I have it at work but I appreciate it. I will try cleaning the face plate with magic eraser, I have that around because of my kids.

    I realize that, but I was not ready to tackle something like that on this receiver, it looked too daunting for me. I appreciate the link. My Sony STR V6 had the pots at an easier to reach location. I need a professional to work on this.

    Nice that looks doable, by someone other than me though. Very MacGyver-esque. Could I connect it back using something like JB Weld?

    Do any of you guys know of someone who could work on this receiver that is not as ham-handed as I am? I actually could not sleep last night because of what happened with the switch: )
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2017
  19. LBPete

    LBPete Rolling Along Subscriber

    Messages:
    10,522
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    There are just a couple of things that will break a shaft like that. Typically it got bent somehow and broke in an attempt to straighten it. It could also be a badly jamed up switch that is exceptionally hard to turn. Hipocrates suggestion above is one of several methods to repair it.

    - Pete
     
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  20. red71rum

    red71rum Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    Clarksville TN
    I am sure you are right, I imagine it was really jammed and I might have turned it too hard possibly. My wife thinks it is due to my weight training. I appreciate everyone's input\help on this by the way.
     

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