Should the Wooly Mammoth Live Again?

Discussion in 'AK Polls' started by similost, Dec 7, 2011.

?

Should we be cloning Wooly Mammoths?

  1. No, They died for a reason.

    71 vote(s)
    28.2%
  2. Yes, we could learn a lot from studying a live one.

    116 vote(s)
    46.0%
  3. No, Momma elephant doesn't want a hairy kid.

    7 vote(s)
    2.8%
  4. Yes, I want my own pet Wolly.

    48 vote(s)
    19.0%
  5. Beats me, what is a wolly mammoth?

    10 vote(s)
    4.0%
  1. similost

    similost Rockin and Rollin....

    Messages:
    37,457
    Location:
    West By God Virginnie
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  2. dosmalo

    dosmalo T-Totaled Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,850
    Location:
    The Cult of Personality
    Yes, playing with fire. The next thing we know they'll be cloneing knuckle-dragging troglodites and there are enough of them running around as it is!
     
  3. jmitchell59

    jmitchell59 Member

    Messages:
    60
    Location:
    Aberdeen, SD
    ***Political comment removed by moderation staff***
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2011
  4. JohnVF

    JohnVF Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    28,767
    Sure it's playing with fire. But that is what science is for.
     
  5. Bigerik

    Bigerik AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    19,839
    Location:
    I've Been Everywhere
    Jurassic Park, anyone?
     
  6. similost

    similost Rockin and Rollin....

    Messages:
    37,457
    Location:
    West By God Virginnie
    Kinda what I was thinking.. if they were to do this, then where do they stop?
     

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  7. stereocuuple

    stereocuuple Two Channel Only Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,461
    Location:
    Kansas City
    yeah i am planing on useing mammoth hide for a platter mat on out marantz. mammoth fur will also make a great room treatment. then there is the meat :banana: oh yeah and lots of it. lets bring em back. then lets hunt em out of existance again.:smoke:
     
  8. AnalogDigit

    AnalogDigit Realistic fan.

    Messages:
    7,820
    Location:
    Des Plaines, IL
    If they were successful, why not clone some Raptors to be released on another country?
     
  9. Stephen J

    Stephen J Suum Cuique

    Messages:
    10,696
    Location:
    North of Motown !
    Oooops,
    We didn't know that the Wooly Mammoth carried a disease that we've never seen before that is fatal to humans....:yikes:
     
  10. mfhale

    mfhale Super Member

    Messages:
    3,502
    Location:
    Houston
    Seems like a pretty bad idea to me.
     
  11. Fran604g

    Fran604g Love at first sound... Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,347
    Location:
    Finger Lakes Territory, RONYC
    Only if we can hunt them ;)
     

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  12. dumptruck

    dumptruck Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    11,432
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    I'm not too worried about a huge animal that rarely and slowly reproduces somehow escaping a lab environment and then somehow succeeding to spread with no gene variation while its better-suited relatives are dying off. Go for it. There isn't ever going to be DNA available from long extinct species for the most part, so I don't think there's any reason to worry about the "where does it stop" issue.
     
  13. Arkay

    Arkay Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    19,967
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    If they bring back the female kind that you can grab by the hair, drag into a cave, and have your way with...and then they're loyal for life... I won't object. :D

    ****EDITED BY MODERATOR TO REMOVE POLITICAL CONTENT****



    Seriously, I think if they can do this, they should. We could learn a lot from such an example, and it would be much safer than even a lot of the genetic manipulation they are already engaging in now. The Woolly (NOT "Wolly", by the way) mammoth is not an experimental creature being concocted in a lab; it is an actual creature that existed, and not that long ago. It existed alongside early man, in a world with an atmosphere similar to today's, albeit in colder (Ice Age) zones, where its long wool coat was a necessity. Keep these somewhere cold (Northern Canada? In a giant air-conditioned place?), and they should be fine.

    The experiments with "roundup ready" food crops are far, far scarier than this idea. Jurassic Park was a deeply flawed bit of Hollyweird fiction, and the reality in this case is completely different. This is a worthy scientific endeavor, and a very "cool" one at that. I say GO FOR IT!

    BUT! If they are going to do this, they should aim to clone a number of different animals and breed them, not just make one lonely individual. They should plan ahead to have reserves where they can breed and live out full lives. I don't think we should (re)create creatures just as "lab rat" specimens, if they are going to have rough lives. Elephants are highly intelligent creatures which exhibit clear signs of complex emotions and social mores, and I assume Mammoths were the same. We should respect that, and give them a chance at "good" lives even as we study them, not mere existence.

    That also raises another set of questions, though. Elephants have learned survival patterns that are passed on from one generation to the next. In Africa, herd elders pass on knowledge of where water holes stay wet during droughts, of plants to eat and ones to avoid at certain times of year, and many other things that are not instinctive. How do these creatures develop such knowledge in the first place? They are somewhat migratory, too; how can we guarantee them a large enough area to live in, if they need to migrate with seasons? What does their presence do to the vegetation and other flora and fauna of a region that hasn't seen them in thousands of years? (i.e., what is their environmental impact?) A lot of such things should be considered and worked out, before we actually bring them back into existence. But these things CAN be satisfactorily worked out, even if it involves some compromises; life and such living creatures are somewhat flexible and adaptable (within reason).

    We once had huge numbers of bison in large areas; today we have only relatively small herds of bison in limited areas, but they do fine and have stable populations and live decent lives. Why not something similar for mammoths? It wasn't only climate change or sabertooths that wiped out the mammoths; early hunting man had a lot to do with it, too, just hunters almost wiped out the bison more recently. Here is a chance to undo something that perhaps we shouldn't have done in the first place (?).

    I think we SHOULD do this, if we can. Let's just do it intelligently.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2011
  14. dumptruck

    dumptruck Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    11,432
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    That's a good point Arkay; Elephants have culture. They would probably be pretty bad at being Mammoths.
     
  15. similost

    similost Rockin and Rollin....

    Messages:
    37,457
    Location:
    West By God Virginnie
    Ii''m sure not gonna argue your altered food stuff Arkay... that stuff does scare me bad..

    And yeah.. .I speeld that wrong :p:
     
  16. steerpike2

    steerpike2 Super Member

    Messages:
    3,237
    Location:
    Transvaal, South Africa
    Their mammoths - however many they make - will all come from a single (or very small number of) gene sources. That will make them very intolerant of environmental pressures, and unlikely that a large self-sustaining population could ever result. But to further understanding of how DNA and ontogeny work, I think it is a very valuable & worthwhile experiment.
     

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  17. Artifact

    Artifact Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Victoria BC Canada
    Isn't it "Wooly" Mammoth??

    Maybe your getting it confused with Wally World...
     
  18. uxwbill

    uxwbill Lurking in the Shadows

    Messages:
    1,499
    Location:
    Illinois
    I had to choose option five, because I don't know what a "wolly mammoth" is. :D :D :D

    (No, I didn't go back and fix the post because I can't count. That is your imagination, and you should pay it no mind!)

    I do think it would be interesting to see what happens, but at the same time I worry about the unintended consequences of reviving something that has been extinct for a long time.
     
  19. RamblinE

    RamblinE (╯°□°)╯彡┻━┻

    This kind of reminds me of the Large Hadron Collider debate. They just don't let any old schmo become a scientist. Just to get any funding to start with you have to be reputable. They will probably do a small experiment in a highly controlled environment and we will learn tons and tons about DNA. This is nothing but win.

    I work with scientists. I'm a lab assistant at UF/IFAS. They're so anal, critical and self deprecating that a project along these lines would be handled very slowly, carefully and seriously.

    Just watch out for cats
    [​IMG]
     
  20. guitarslam

    guitarslam Sonic Moron

    Messages:
    2,289
    Location:
    B.C. interior, Canada
    IMO, the resurrection of wooly mammoths is not a problem.
    It is pretty hard to lose one.

    What concerns me is the creation of genetic monsters (i.e. microorganisms and plant seeds) which we have no control over after they are released into the environment.
     

Share This Page