Show Us Your Dinner! (Home Cooking ONLY please!)

Discussion in 'Cooking & Spirits' started by sKiZo, Jan 8, 2016.

  1. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    Roast chicken thighs, roasted red potatoes and roasted brussel sprouts.

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  2. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Duck/shitake mushroom spring rolls, spring cabbage/cucumber salad, and a chili/coriander mayo for exstra nom :)

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  3. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    We had pizza for dinner tonight, which was nice but not pic-worthy. A couple of croque madames for breakfast, however, was a right treat!

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  4. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,369
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    Pho' (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup)

    We enjoy this regularly around here. It takes around 26 hours to make a batch, which is then separated into its component parts and frozen separately. Later, the fresh components are added to the frozen components and voila, Pho.

    Dinner (3-21).jpg

    I have listed the specifics of making this previously, so I won't repeat them here. Needless to say, this batch turned out to be quite tasty
    http://audiokarma.org/forums/index....ooking-only-please.696992/page-5#post-9363491

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
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  5. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    I'll have to try that sometime. I'm quite well versed in the Danish, French, and Italian quisines, but that's pretty much it for my part. So I am looking to branch out into some different cooking styles from the ones I'm used to.
     
  6. pustelniakr

    pustelniakr Silver Miner at Large Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,369
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    This one is one of our household favorites, and great for intimate dinners with close friends. When entertaining, the cooking is done in an electric skillet, at the table, where all the ingredients are presented in small bowls, and everyone participates in putting items in the skillet, as they run low, and taking them out, when cooked to their liking.

    At home, in personal-sized caste-iron skillets, we do a quick saute of the beef, in fresh beef suet, then add in the Sukiyaki sauce and other ingredients in a pleasant visual arrangement and simmer for a brief period and serve.

    Japanese Sukiyaki

    Dinner (3-23).jpg

    What all goes into this tasty treat has been posted in a previous thread. I will just refer you there: http://audiokarma.org/forums/index....ooking-only-please.696992/page-7#post-9382771

    Enjoy,
    Rich P
     
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  7. IPADave

    IPADave AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,440
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Chicken Tikka Masala served over Basmati rice with peas.

    -Dave

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    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
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  8. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Spaghetti, prawns, and tomatoes in a white wine/butter sauce with a bit of dill, and pecorino.
    It was no trouble getting my 7-year-old niece to eat her dinner today :)

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  9. DOBIEGUY

    DOBIEGUY AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    562
    Location:
    Woodhaven N.Y.
    The last word in 'finger food'
    Stuffed with bread crumbs,parsley,chopped garlic and cheese.
    Cooked slow and finished with tomato sauce and more cheese.
    A bottle of red, extra napkins and some smooth music on the stereo. Life is good!
    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
  10. sKiZo

    sKiZo Hates received: 8641 Subscriber

    Something different tonight ... Stuffed squash w/lamb chops ...

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    Acorn squash pre-baked, then filled with a mix of mushrooms, onions, rotel, sweet peppers, and shredded cheese. The filling is also mostly cooked in advance and added to the squash after that's gone tender. Another 15 minutes to melt the cheese and meld the flavors from there.

    Lamb chops were marinated overnight in onions, lemon juice, olive oil, red wine, and flavored with garlic, marjoram and thyme.

    Nice mix of flavors ... gonna have to put this on my "favorites" list.
     
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  11. Ranchman

    Ranchman Member

    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    That looks great!
     
  12. Ranchman

    Ranchman Member

    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    I love lamb. Did you add the marjoram and thyme to your marinade or use after. I add a sprig of rosemary and thyme to my marinade. That plate looks great.
     
  13. sKiZo

    sKiZo Hates received: 8641 Subscriber

    ... both. Why half step? <G>

    I'd think parsley would bes a nice touch too, but I didn't have any. :(

    PS ... I bake the lamb right in the marinade as well, in a glass dish with foil on top so it can steam a bit in it's juices.

    And ya ... what's the deal with lamb anyway? Right tasty meat, yet not all that popular. My local grocery has a hundred feet of meat, and maybe two of that's lamb. Used to be it was quite expensive compared to beef and pork, but that's no longer true.
     
  14. Ranchman

    Ranchman Member

    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    Yes parsley would be good. All my herbs are just coming back from winters hibernation. I've also used balsamic vinegar in the lamb marinade. As for the unpopularity of lamb I don't really know. I think most people had it when they were young. Probably over cooked and very dry giving it a strong flavor. That's how my wife remembers it.
     
  15. usedto

    usedto Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    15,773
    Location:
    Central Moonbeamia
    First - whatever it is that produces the lanolin in their skin/wool can have a rank smell that alot of people don't care for. The older the animal, the stronger the smell/taste. My late grandmother used to fix mutton from time to time, and I could barely stand the smell of it cooking.

    Beef can be just as bad. We used to raise some beef for our own use. They let them graze in a field that had tons of oak trees. The cattle would eat the acorns, and it gave the fat a terrible smell and taste. I hated eating our own beef. At 66 years old, I'm just now getting to the point where I'll eat a steak once in awhile.
     
  16. sKiZo

    sKiZo Hates received: 8641 Subscriber

    Cabbage Rolls tonite ...

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    Those usually follow close behind corned beef and cabbage. I peel the outer leaves and save those to wrap the cabbage rolls. Those are a mix of hamburger, sage sausage, barley, and whole egg, with basic seasoning, and topped with spaghetti sauce.
     
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  17. sKiZo

    sKiZo Hates received: 8641 Subscriber

    Ah ... speaking of corn beef and cabbage ... that was a couple days ago and I forgot to post it up.

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    The corned beef pretty much fell apart after maybe 8 hours in the crock pot, stewing in onion soup. Plenty left for sandwiches. The cabbage and potatoes were added to the pot a couple hours before serving so they stayed firm.
     
  18. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Steak n' eggs

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  19. IPADave

    IPADave AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,440
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Nice looking steak!

    -Dave
     
  20. K_50

    K_50 Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Thanks. I think it turned out pretty well too.
    I used a rump steak (I think - beef is cut slightly differently here, but it's the cut right behind the sirloin), which I like because it's both affordable, and flavourful. Also it usually comes in a good thickness, so you can get a nice sear on the outside without overcooking it. It got a good minute per side on a high heat, and then I turned it down to around medium, added some sliced onions, and gave it a few more minutes on each side until it was almost done. Then I put it aside to rest, while the onions got nicely caramellised with some balsamic vinegar and a bit of Worcestershire sauce. Served on toasted dark rye, and topped with eggs - quick, easy, and delicious, all in one pan :)
     
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