Soliloquy 6.2 Crossover Problem?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by ScooterMcTav, Mar 20, 2017 at 5:07 PM.

  1. ScooterMcTav

    ScooterMcTav Active Member

    Messages:
    114
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Hi Folks,

    I seem to be having challenges with a set of Soliloquy 6.2 speakers, and would like to describe the symptoms I'm having to see if there are suggestions

    When I first teamed them with a Musical Fidelity a3.2 integrated, I found the sound to be extremely forward (to the point of harshness) yet extremely anemic under 60Hz. So I changed the power to a McIntosh MA-6100 which was only able to balance the sound with a bit of bass in. When I added a Rotel power amp to the Mc, the sound improved a little bit more, especially on the top end dynamics.

    Even when one looks at the frequency specs, I was only ever able to get solid bass below 40Hz when I had them hooked to a Luxman R-1050, and had both the loudness control in, and had some additional gain on the bass knob.

    Right now, I do have the speakers apart (I’m refinishing them from their God-awful cherry color), making this the perfect time to do a thorough investigation of the crossovers. I guess the potential exists that there could be something wrong with the crossovers, though my understanding is this shouldn’t be removing all of the bass energy.

    And really, they are just “strange” – they sound nothing like any of my other “flat” speakers such as my Wharfedale Diamond 10.6, or my Monitor Audio Silver 8i. Although each set has a different “flavor” to it, both are similar in their frequency response, while the Soliloquy just sounds way different – almost like they have an EQ bump of 2-6db in the 1-4kHz range, and a 10 db rolloff at 40Hz.

    Do the symptoms sound consistent with an issue with the crossovers? Or any other suggestions? These speakers seem to get a lot of love online from those who've had them, but I'm not feeling it.
     
  2. onplane

    onplane What! No Wake???

    Messages:
    1,753
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Usually the low pass filter in the xover consists of a coil in series with the driver and a cap shunt. Seriously doubt anything there will significantly impact your low frequency response.

    Now, there are two potential issues:

    1. Woofer seal - check for any air leaks around the woofer. Yes, ported systems are designed to "leak", but the only leak is supposed to be via the port.

    2. Voice - your problem may simply be the high frequency driver is out in of the woofer in terms of SPL. What you might try is bi-amping. You have enough amps. By dedicating amps to high and low frequency drivers, you can vary power sent to the respective halves and thus you gain control over the speaker's voice. For example, you want more "laid back" speakers, throttle back the high frequency amp.

    Regards,
    Jerry
     
  3. ScooterMcTav

    ScooterMcTav Active Member

    Messages:
    114
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Thanks Jerry, appreciate the confirmation on how the crossover works.

    Woofer seal is fine - some of the tightest fit drivers I'be ever seen in a speaker.

    I have bi-amped before when I had another set of speakers that needed it (also due to voicing) but it was an odd config, with two woofers and the mid on the same binding posts.

    Although I appreciate the idea behind biamping, I'm surprised a $2,700 pair of speakers (that Tim Shea from Soundstage! gave a reviewers choice award to, and he used them as reference speakers for a few years) should need this just to get a level response.

    This is what makes me wonder if there is something simply wrong with mine. Sounds like the crossover is not the culprit.

    All this being said the woofer and tweeter have their own enclosures (unsealed) - possibly the woofer's chamber's polyfill has "spread out" over time and is over damping the bass response.
     
  4. onplane

    onplane What! No Wake???

    Messages:
    1,753
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Scooter, anything is possible, but I've never heard of the fill impacting a ported system. Now, the fill is extremely important is sealed units.

    Another part of voicing is your room. Any chance you have hard wood floors? Lots of reflective surfaces?

    Regards,
    Jerry
     
  5. ScooterMcTav

    ScooterMcTav Active Member

    Messages:
    114
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Thanks again Jerry,

    It is a hard room, but there is really only one problematic reflective surface. Otherwise we have furniture, carpets, and window treatments that should knock a lot of the hard reflections down.

    And as noted, this mid bloom bass roll off seems mainly confined to this pair of speakers, and not its contemporaries in the same space.

    Bit of a stumper, unless the speaker is voiced poorly, or has some other problem I need to deduce
     
  6. onplane

    onplane What! No Wake???

    Messages:
    1,753
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Scooter, all I can suggest is that you put two amps on them - both amps with volume controls. This way you can reduce power sent to the high frequency drivers.

    As for the bass roll off, this is one of the reasons why I do NOT like rear firing ports. The speaker has to be away from the wall for the ports to work properly, but you then lose the room gain you get at the wall/floor junction.

    Oh, well, you might try boosting the bass a tad, Scooter.

    Regards,
    Jerry
     

Share This Page