Sony TA-3200F giving it a workout. Does a recap make it better?

Discussion in 'Vintage Gear - Top Performers' started by Blue Shadow, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Blue Shadow

    Blue Shadow I gotta get me a new title

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    Chip has his Sony amp here and I have one. His is recapped, repaired, tested and ready to go but I want to keep it for a week or two which is no problem, he works out of town.

    Got a call last week from Tammer who wants to drop by next week and since he lives in Chicago, I said sure. But he wants his wife to hear the Magneplanars for the imaging. I have to rearrange speakers but that is no big deal to say, harder to do but they are in the sound room, just need to set up what folks want to hear.

    I moved stuff around, dusted, cleaned some things and got the MG-IIIas set up. Last time I heard these, they were on the big main, the McCormack DNA-1 and I thought there were some noises. The speakers had been repaired 5+ years ago and I thought maybe the mid section might have some delam or something so I hooked up something else. Since I'm burning in the Sony amp, in go the Magnepans and let's put on a CD while I work on the rest of the room...wait what is that sound...really, Magnepans don't do that...bass response. Happy with the first listen to the amp on these speakers and will be trying more things. The Dahlquist sub hasn't been used with them yet, the tube amps are standing ready, having just been replaced with testing the Sony and well I need to see if the Sony is all that compared to the DNA-1 and to a more normal amp of 100wpc. I don't need big power for this, they aren't going to want to knock the walls down. I've got other speakers for that.

    And I borrowed Mark's new to him Suzanne Vega album. So quiet you don't know the stylus is in the groove, made a mistake on that twice already. Gotta love quiet vinyl.

    Anyway, I said recapped vs. stock and these speakers should be able to show me the difference as I swap my stock unmolested (generally, there are fuse holders put in where the pigtail 6.3A fuses go on the input board) TA-3200F for the recapped unit. Right now I like what I'm hearing. more to follow in a few days I guess.

    Posted this here because the Sony TA-3200F is the epitome of a Vintage Gear - Top Performer. I've read they targeted McIntosh when they built this line of gear.
     
  2. dshoaf

    dshoaf That high voltage buzz Subscriber

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    Thanks for posting about the TA-3200 amps. I worked on a few of them - they weren't big sellers mainly because Sony dealers did not necessarily carry McIntosh. It was not perceived to be in the same league at that time.

    The stand-alone power amp, preamps and the preamp/tuner Sony sold back then were not fast movers for the regular joe-consumer type who just wanted a nice system. So, I suspect they'd be called rare today for that reason - not many sold.

    Internally, frankly, they used many of the same circuits as the receivers; right down to the power amp modules and circuit topologies. In the preamps, however, there was more power supply regulation and filtering and, in the preamp/tuner, they used socketed board interconnects, which actually caused more problems with oxidizing contacts than if they had used the more-common point-to-point wiring harnesses used in the receivers. Anyone who has recapped or repaired one of these will instantly recognize what I'm talking about! Just recap them, rebias 'em, make sure they're meeting spec and you're fine.

    These separates, however, cannot be discounted for sound quality in any way. I am just commenting on the observation that they built them differently as they chased McIntosh, which I disagree with. It wasn't until the late 70s that the all-out attack on the high-end gear of that day took off. Brands like Accuphase, (sort of like Lexus vs Toyota), were introduced to reposition the brands associated with joe-consumer products for that reason.

    Cheers,

    David
     
  3. Blue Shadow

    Blue Shadow I gotta get me a new title

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    Interesting I see these units quite frequently. I'm more tuned into them though as my first stereo had the TA-2000 preamp with a Kenwood tuner and a Dynaco amp I built. Nice gear back then.

    I recapped the TA-2000F that came with this amp a few years ago. I wasn't impressed with the sound but maybe the caps needed a burn in. I'll see if Chris wants to drag it back over to be reunited with his amp to test the combo.

    It was the mid-70 when Luxman came out with their 50th anniversary gear that the Japanese McIntosh came to be a common term. The C-1000, T-110 and M-4000 were a formidable combination in looks and performance, earning that tag along with the tube units from that era.
     
  4. dshoaf

    dshoaf That high voltage buzz Subscriber

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    Agreed, Luxman was one of the first to take on McIntosh, who had developed an enviable position as the high-end, full service provider of audio gear. It was richly deserved and Mac had developed an elite cadre of dealers who delivered on their value system. As the rise of mail-order audio in the 70s took off, Mac actually went the other way and required their dealers not to engage in that emerging distribution method. The Japanese competitors didn't, however, and that made it more accessible.

    Luxman offered lower cost (not that much lower, actually) gear and tried to recruit the dealers but was less successful in the distribution. So, many of us heard about Luxman, saw their magazine ads but never actually saw the stuff.

    For that reason, I believe Luxman gear of the 70s (not later stuff) is 'rare' mainly because you couldn't buy it easily.

    Cheers,

    David
     
  5. Blue Shadow

    Blue Shadow I gotta get me a new title

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    It was interesting back then with brands that were specifically for the retail outlets and others maybe even the same manufacturer being for warehouse sales. I wasn't in a large city in the late 70s early 80s to be able to have a store with the new high end gear that was starting to come out but one store had McIntosh and we sold Luxman. I don't even know if/when the Krell/Mark Levinson/Threshold type of gear even made it to town. But the Luxman/Mcintosh were some nice pieces.
     
  6. Seamaster

    Seamaster AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I had TA-3200F and TA-2000, I sold TA3200F rather quickly but kept TA-2000 for another year. TA-3200 sounded thin and bass was weak, while TA2000 sounded really nice but not as detailed and dynamic as modern gear, a relaxed, warm, and musical presentation, the headphone output was pretty good too.

    As preamp, I prefer TA2000 than McIntosh MA6900’s preamp section. The 6900’s preamp sounds really dry and mechanical, while the power amp section was much better but later beat by Sony TAN-77ES
     

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