Spare part for my Pioneer PD-TM2

Discussion in 'Digital Sources' started by Lelle, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. Lelle

    Lelle Active Member

    Messages:
    111
    Hello everyone,

    About 2 months ago I bought a Pioneer PD-TM2 18-disc CD Changer.
    The seller mentioned that it worked perfectly,
    well.. upon arrival and testing it had difficulties to change magazine.
    The bottom magazine plays well, except it sounds a bit like the cd wobbles or are a bit to close to the laser or from it. It's a bit hard to describe.
    It was supposed to be a christmas gift for my dad as he's looking for a Pioneer disc changer.

    And a closer inspection inside showed that a gearwheel that handles the disc changer mechanism was a bit broken/damaged. And I cannot find any spareparts, it seems that PD-TM1 and Pioneer PD-TM3 are using the same parts. Talked to a friend, and suggested if I knew someone that could 3D-print a new gearwheel it could work. I'm not into 3D-printing, and I have never used a 3D-printer. Now the cd-changer just standing there collecting dust. It's a pity that I cannot use it. And I like the Pioneer disc-changers. Uploaded 2 pictures of how the gearwheel looks like.

    Hoping that someone could help me.
     

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  2. ETLS

    ETLS metacarpophalangealcranium Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,599
    Location:
    Texas
    At our local library, they have a 3-D printer. For a nominal cost, they have people who know how to use it, and can duplicate the part. The actual cost here, is to replace their consumables. It's very cost effective.
     
  3. Lelle

    Lelle Active Member

    Messages:
    111
    Thanks for your answer, so it is possible to 3dprint new gearwheels. Do u need the dimensions and size of the gearwheel? And how much would it cost with a 3D-printed sparepart? I think that this part can be located in the service manual.
     
  4. ETLS

    ETLS metacarpophalangealcranium Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,599
    Location:
    Texas
    It would be best to have an actual specimen. It would need to be scanned to be recreated, or would need a detailed blueprint so one could be duplicated. Check with your local library first, to see if they have a 3-D printer. They may be able to find a spec sheet for that part, who knows, always worth a try.
     
  5. Lelle

    Lelle Active Member

    Messages:
    111
    I can give it a try, but I'm very unsure if my local library has a 3d printer. Not sure if any measurements are being mentioned in the service manual, I don't think so.
     
  6. ETLS

    ETLS metacarpophalangealcranium Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,599
    Location:
    Texas
    A quick phone call to the library and you will know if they have a 3-D printer. Also if they don't, check the phone book for machinist shops.
     

     

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  7. Lelle

    Lelle Active Member

    Messages:
    111
    I will check that tomorrow, I will also ask some of my facebook friends if anyone has a 3d printer or knows someone who has one.
     
    ETLS likes this.
  8. Capitol C

    Capitol C New Member

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I just found this thread and want to encourage Lelle to pursue this! I received a Monoprice MP Select Mini 3D Printer V2, a very inexpensive ($189) 3D printer, for my birthday. I've used Tinkercad, a free online program to design a few things and Cura to convert the design into instructions for the printer. If you can use basic tools or (even better) took a course in mechanical drawing in high school, you should be able to make a very good replacement for the damaged gear. There are a number of programs that help you design gears (https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-models-of-gears-for-3D-printing/, for example). You would design two gears and, in Tinkercad, merge a big gear to a smaller gear using the Group command. There is a learning curve, but if you have the time and the interest, it is fun, and it is a skill worth having. I've made a spare head shell for my Thorens TD 318 MK II turntable. I'm still testing it, so far it works very well. When I'm done with the testing, I'll post something on Audiokarma to get feedback from the community.
     

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