Spinning 78's through an RIAA applied EQ Curve- Adjustments?

Discussion in 'Turntables' started by Arthur Smith, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. needlestein

    needlestein Addicted Member

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    The word is WEAR! WEAR! W, E, A, R

    Thank you. Carry on!
     
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  2. s rassi

    s rassi Member

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    "What we've got here is failure to communicate..."

    So this entire fracas is because, according to one party of this dispute, you cannot play old 78s, even with a purpose-built "78 stylus", on anything other than a disposable steel needle on an acoustic phonograph?
     
  3. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    Can you believe this?
     
  4. needlestein

    needlestein Addicted Member

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    I'm confused, too. Even if the old impregnated shellacs contain iron and even abrasives, are you supposed to go out and buy a Victrola? You'd think if the danger was so bad and the demand so great that someone would have come up with a 1/2" cartridge for standard arms that takes those steel needles. I mean, why not? How hard could it be to come up with a steel needle 1/2" cartridge or some equivalent?
     
  5. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    I understand the point that you're trying to make, but it's a useless one. You can play any 78 with a modern 78 stylus. I don't know how much you play 78's, but I've been playing them for 30 years, all kinds, with no issues. I have over 1000 of them. There is no issue here and I'm not certain why you continue to press the issue, especially when the OP did not ask for an opinion on the type of stylus that he should use, but on using a certain kind of preamp. Probably should just move on.
     
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  6. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    Again, the only "danger" is playing a modern (post 1940) 78 on a Victrola type player with a steel needle. The record will get chewed up quickly. Playing an older 78 with a modern 78 stylus is fine, and will cause no unusual harm to either the record or stylus.
     
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  7. Arthur Smith

    Arthur Smith Well-Known Member

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    That's how I roll. People, stop fretting, and start playing your music!
     
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  8. sregor

    sregor AK Subscriber Subscriber

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  9. s rassi

    s rassi Member

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    Thank you, that does seem interesting. I don't know much about 78s yet, but am keen to learn. I've inherited a handful of disc, though sadly, nothing on them is of particular interest to me(mostly it's the kind of stuff my grandparents would have danced to at the pavilion back in the postwar years), and I don't own anything I could play them with though my Crosley-esque cheapogram could actually spin at 78.
     
  10. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    I like to use this. Comes with a manual that gives the compensation settings for lots of labels.

    http://www.esotericsound.com/elect.htm#d_Equalizers

    [​IMG]
     
  11. KentTeffeteller

    KentTeffeteller Gimpus Stereophilus!

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    Except for a lot of post 1955 78 RPM discs, the equalization curves varied. There is a good chart online of who used what curve and gives you the graphic EQ baseline curves and you can tweak it from there how you like it best. That is functionally similar to the Esoteric Sound re-equalizer but done with a graphic equalizer of some kind.
     
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  12. vwestlife

    vwestlife Active Member

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    Why would a shellac 78 from the 1940s get "chewed up" any more quickly than one from the 1930s? Was there some change in shellac formulation that I've never heard of before? Or are you talking about the 1950s 78s that were pressed on vinyl, sometimes even microgroove?

    Here is a shellac 78 from 1947 being played on a circa-1915 Columbia Grafanola:

     
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  13. sberger

    sberger Hard Core Geezer Subscriber

    Vinyl.
     
  14. jusmee

    jusmee Active Member

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    I think there is some concern that the later 78s, particularly the laminated ones with a thin layer of purer shellac on the surface, will wear faster.

    Actually, to add to that, I also read that the 'hotter' modulations in the groove can damage the diaphragm in an acoustic reproducer - not sure about this myself.
     
  15. hi*ball

    hi*ball Records & Coffee Subscriber

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    I've deleted this post. My apologies. It was a bit harsh!
     
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  16. eb2jim

    eb2jim Super Member

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    Actually I was under the impression Edison discs needed a cart that reads laterally. And you can mod a regular cart to do that.
     
  17. Arthur Smith

    Arthur Smith Well-Known Member

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    N
    No stylus, no listen. Do you have a better approach?
     
  18. Arthur Smith

    Arthur Smith Well-Known Member

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    I have 80+ year old 78's that play extremely well. Most of the people on here that spread untruths have never even tried to play a 78.
     
  19. KentTeffeteller

    KentTeffeteller Gimpus Stereophilus!

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    The post 1940 78 RPM discs were cut at far louder levels, they have wider dynamic range than the 1930's discs did. Improvements in recording technology apply. These records were designed for electrical playback instead of acoustic playback.
     
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  20. Arthur Smith

    Arthur Smith Well-Known Member

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    It amazes me how many folks spend more time fretting about wearing down their styli, and chewing up their records, as opposed to playing and enjoying them. Styli and records are replaceable. Enjoyed experiences, and memories, are not. Try playing a song like Glen Miller's Moonlight Serenade on a 78, and keeping a dry eye. Especially if you have stories handed down through generations about where they were, what they remember, during and after WW2. Glen Miller was not known as a sentimental, warm person. Yet, touched so many with this masterpiece. Best heard on, yes, the original 78.
     
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