SX-750 Asthetics

Discussion in 'Pioneer Audio' started by turnitup, Jan 4, 2018.

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  1. turnitup

    turnitup Well-Known Member

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    D48B3ED0-5636-4AA6-9E2C-D7494777B6B0.jpeg 4E0765C1-253B-4D3E-A39C-81D006B2A48E.jpeg 047BE806-1522-4305-AF44-83A66CD77BAE.jpeg I came across a SX-750 probably about 5 years ago. Broken (off) power/speaker pot knob, SS# engraved on the top of the faceplate, lights burned out, and the old vinyl veneer on the case was peeling badly. I’ve seen worse (and refurbished worse), but this was close to a parts deck.

    Brought it home, and read up on the notoriously bad power switch, and the difficulty of finding a replacement parts - since virtually all of the SX-750 (and lower model units) suffered from the same original flawed design issue. Virtually all of the units needed power switch repair or replacement. Dusted it off, wrapped it in plastic, and put it in dry dock, where has sit for the last ~5 years.

    Long story short, finally found a donor power switch, and started the repair process. Ground off the SS# number with a rotary metal brush. Ordered new veneer, and new LED replacement lights. Finished everything tonight, and hope to set it up for it’s debut soon. Fun to bring something back from the brink, that really deserves it. It needs to have the caps replaced, but that is for another day...
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
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  2. macyjrm

    macyjrm AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    From an industrial design standpoint, I think the xx50 series is about as good as it gets. Simple, straightforward, timeless.
     
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  3. slow_jazz

    slow_jazz Lunatic Member

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    Looks beautiful.

    Great job.
     
  4. Cuppy

    Cuppy AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    turnitup, I agree with slow_jazz. Very nice job on the re-veneer.

    I am about 1/2 way through a full restore on a 750. Any tips or tricks regarding the veneer? Did you leave the case intact and just tackle a side at a time? Also, do you mind providing a source for the veneer?

    By the way, have you set it up for the "debut" yet?
     
  5. turnitup

    turnitup Well-Known Member

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    Thanks - I found another thread that referenced the source for the veneer, it ended up being Amazon. It is essentially a vinyl product that comes in a 18” wide by 6-7’ roll. It was cheap too, about $7.00 for a roll (regularly $20+). I ordered cherry, and really didn’t like the look of it until I applied it on the receiver (just didn’t initially look real on the roll). Removed all of the fake wood parts (took every surface completely apart, including removing the black grill) and just used a razor blade and an exacto-knife to recover all parts with the veneer (peeled all of the old off, and cleaned it with alcohol before putting on the new veneer). Really ended up liking the results, it looked a whole lot better that I thought it would.

    REAL veneer would have been awesome, but this was a very economical way to get it back very close to the original look. Just take your time, and try to avoid bubbles in the veneer when you apply it. If you do get bubbles, just make a tiny slice and force the air out, it’ll be completely invisible.

    I’ve got a ton of the veneer left over for other projects too...

    Hooked it up last weekend, and it performed great!

    If you dig a little I’m sure that you can find the thread in here, sorry I don’t have reference to it for you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018 at 9:53 PM
  6. Cuppy

    Cuppy AK Subscriber Subscriber

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  7. Awesomeaudio

    Awesomeaudio AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    You should try and post up some clearer pics to show off the woodwork and metal work.
    Pics are too dark.
     

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