They Say That Granite Rings - Xeriscaping in the Postnuclear Free-World

Discussion in 'General Off Topic Forums' started by mfrench, Oct 9, 2014.

  1. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    I know you know the erosion run-off issue all too well. Thank you.
    I like the fact that the pile now has a new home. I have picked it down to dirt now, and by the time this project is through, and, *what I also have in mind, I will have used almost all of that pile.
    The property executor was just going to dig a hole on the land, and bury it. So, he doesn't have to do that.

    As of today, I finally made it to the drain pipe clean out, which marks my vertical end goal.
    DSCN5973.jpg DSCN5974.jpg DSCN5975.jpg



    * I'm going to create the flooring/dry creek outflow on my Water Wall with the remnants that are left over. This might totally clean out the entire granite pile.

    and in another note,... I also used this same granite to create a vertical extension on top of my Fire on the Mtn. Eucalyptus stump plater. I laid broken sections of the granite horizontally to create a dry-stacked ledge stone extension, around the top of the stump perimeter, that might be 12" tall? 10" minimum. No pics yet.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
    bobabode, SoCal Sam and Pio1980 like this.

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  2. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    And, we're finally topped, and, capped.
    DSCN5993.jpg DSCN5992.jpg DSCN5990.jpg

    Early on, I made a decision to not do any cutting; to use the pieces as found. That ethic workedd out well enough, until the top cap. Due to the erraticness of the different pieces, I was able to stitch together a coherent top. But, it left a gap. That gap is going to be covered by a stacked planter of this same material, like below, where I used the same material in a test stacking to see how it worked as a ledge stone planter.

    The top stacked region brings us up to a level area of grade, just higher than the drop into the sump. It also conceals the clean out pipe under a slab of the cap pieces. In order to access the cleanup, that slab is removed, and, the vent on the vertical face is easily disasssembled to freely access the cleanup.

    This is my Fire on the Mtn. planter, with an added foot of ledge stone stacking. I did this this past weekend, just to test theory, and I liked how it worked. So, I'll stack something like this over the gap at the top of the drain board feature.
    DSCN5985.jpg DSCN5982.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
    bobabode likes this.
  3. SoCal Sam

    SoCal Sam Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    19,462
    Location:
    Picker's Paradise
    Agave attenuata is a favorite. I've gotten lucky on free CL and salvaged a couple of sizable patches.

    [​IMG]
     
    tubed, bobabode and mfrench like this.
  4. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    Nice MCM. Very interesting roofline! Your rooflline reminds me of the mid-stacking area of my drain board.
    That is a lot of hillside behind you.
     
    bobabode, SoCal Sam and Pio1980 like this.
  5. SoCal Sam

    SoCal Sam Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    19,462
    Location:
    Picker's Paradise
    Most of the hillside is mine which is good and bad. The good is no nosy neighbors. The bad is I have to maintain it.
     
    mfrench likes this.
  6. bobabode

    bobabode AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    10,087
    Location:
    SoCal
    Nice pad you've got there, Sam. Very nice.
     
    mfrench, Pio1980 and SoCal Sam like this.

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  7. bobabode

    bobabode AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    10,087
    Location:
    SoCal
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
    mfrench likes this.
  8. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    And,... stacking the main structure is finished, and functioning in todays rain.
    This is the first daylight rain that I've seen (twice at night now).
    DSCN6023.jpg
    DSCN6025.jpg
    DSCN6027.jpg

    From the street view (in car, stopped on road):
    DSCN6028.jpg DSCN6029.jpg

    Now to the plantings, to create a backdrop screen, and soften the edges.
     
    bobabode likes this.
  9. SoCal Sam

    SoCal Sam Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    19,462
    Location:
    Picker's Paradise
    2.6 inches of rain today. Three more days of rain in the forecast.
     
    mfrench and bobabode like this.
  10. bobabode

    bobabode AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    10,087
    Location:
    SoCal
    Just had the roofs cleaned and all the drainage is working. I'm enjoying it. We need more lightning and thunder, though. (grin)
     
    mfrench likes this.
  11. pliskin

    pliskin Active Member

    Messages:
    150
    Location:
    GettysburggrubsytteG
    If this hasn't already been mentioned it will blow your mind.
    Build a Quickrete wall by stacking bags of it in whatever configuration you like then just wet it with water. After a while the paper will biodegrade and you'll be left with perfectly stacked concrete stones that are very tight fit. For taller walls (to keep from tipping over) drive re-bar steaks through before wetting. You can even make smaller ones by filling paper lunch bags with Quickrete.
    wall01.jpg
    wall1.jpg
    wallljpg.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
    mfrench and Pio1980 like this.

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  12. toxcrusadr

    toxcrusadr Omelette au Fromage Subscriber

    Messages:
    34,489
    Location:
    Central Missouri
    Excellent work mfrench! I daresay if some millionaire wanted a granite countertop waterfall, it would not look nicer than that from the finest contractors, and it would cost a fortune!

    If only I had a place like that to get remnants. All we have is a Brick & Block place and you can have all the broken masonry you want for fill material. Boring.
     
    mfrench likes this.
  13. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    Yes, that works really well. It looks a bit odd, until the bags erode away.
    I did it in a headwall for my dry creek drainage system. This is from page one of this thread:
    DSCN1499_zpsbc810ab0.jpg
    I used two courses of 60lb concrete bags, and, for added strength, I faced them with scalloped lawn edging pieces, and then covered the entire thing in hardware poultry cloth, and, jute staples to hold it together against incoming flows from the hillside above. The concrete set the just staples in permanently. They hold the poultry mesh down, and make the thing a multi-ton barricade that ain't moveable.
    This is in a remote area, and mostly out of sight. Pretty wasn't as important as function in this case.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
    pliskin and Pio1980 like this.
  14. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow

    Well, I thank you very much.
    I'm an amateur, at this point in my life. But, in another life, I was that contractor, doing the finest homes built as a fine home finisher.
    By that, I mean, I have two homes in Architetural Digest Magazine. One is a cover and featured home. The other is as a featured article. These two are amongst a string of homes that went to ridiculous levels of finishings. I did those finishes.
    So, I have a bit of a background in this. Now, I just work for Sarge, the spousal unit, for $5.50 a day.
    I was supposed to get a 1% cost of living increase at the new year, and was really trying to get the big projects done before that kicked in; but, times got a bit tighter, and, the union said it was OK not to increase my rates.

    My A.D. cover home:
    DSCN1994.jpg DSCN1995.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  15. SoCal Sam

    SoCal Sam Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    19,462
    Location:
    Picker's Paradise
    Another inch of rain today...
     
  16. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    We're just not getting it that much here. We got .8" yesterday, and, maybe .4"+ today (adding: and it did rain pretty well all night. woke up to over 1.5" in the gauge).
    We're on a coastal upslope area, and usually get a bit more of a wringing out as the storms clear the mountain. But not this time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019

     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  17. pliskin

    pliskin Active Member

    Messages:
    150
    Location:
    GettysburggrubsytteG
    Can I ask you, did you just let the rain wet the bags or did you use a hose? I'm planning to do low retaining wall using Quickrete. I was told it would eventually harden on it's own just sitting out in the weather. My wall will be to far from the house for a water hose so I can't easily get water to it.
     
  18. mfrench

    mfrench Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    On the West Side of Rainbow
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  19. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

    Messages:
    28,641
    Location:
    Eastern Bamastan
    Yes, concrete is hygroscopic, taking moisture out of the air. Bags exposed to weathering will eventually harden on their own.
     
  20. toxcrusadr

    toxcrusadr Omelette au Fromage Subscriber

    Messages:
    34,489
    Location:
    Central Missouri
    My builder told me that the strongest concrete is concrete that is hydrated slowly. You can even pour dry mix into a post hole and let it absorb moisture from the soil. Only problem is you have to wait a long time before you can remove bracing and put any stress on it, which is not usually compatible with schedules.
     

Share This Page