Was this recording made with electricity or made with a metal horn?

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by KaatheSnake, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:26 PM.

  1. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone!
    It's time to play a little game. This will be focusing on 20s recordings. Some were made with a metal horn (acoustically,) which means the musicians all gathered around a brass horn shaped like a giant trumpet, and played it the horn. The air pressure and sound would resonate throughout the horn, causing a steel needle to vibrate, then the vibrations were engraved into a disc or a wax cylinder by a record cutter. So, here are the rules:
    1: I post the recording first, then you answer. I'll also participate in the game, so if you have a recording that you want to post, I'll give you my best answer.
    2: No negativity and or trolling, this does not belong on AudioKarma.
    3: Keep everything to the point, and have lots of fun! This will fun for all you turntable and record fans! I'll start with the first recording. They have a pic of a mic in the picture, so that should give it away.
    Have fun!
    Ryan
     

     

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  2. Kosinki

    Kosinki AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Wire recording
     
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  3. petehall347

    petehall347 the brandy coffee man Subscriber

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    Microphone: Western Electric 373W carbon element, mounted in a Palmenberg ring and stand
     
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  4. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Great answer! What type of wire machine do you think they used?
    As said in the description. It's a carbon microphone
     
  5. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    The recording does sound quite magnetic, so I'd say wire or maybe a Westrex 78 electromagnetic record cutter. Either one could be possible my friend.
     
  6. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    That brings me to a new theory. Could it have been that Victor recorded the band on wire first, then recorded it onto a disc so the general public could play it on their Victrola? That couldn't have been the case with acoustical recording, because it's mechanical. You have to have electricity to create a electromagnetic charge. Simple logic there.
     

     

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  7. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Okay. This is another one. This one should be pretty easy, also.
     
  8. g..v

    g..v Addicted Member

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    Professional slide whistle player, eh?
     
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  9. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    LOL! I don't think there is such thing as a "professional slide whistle player." Sure he wasn't just whistling? They didn't have theremins then, did they?
     
  10. g..v

    g..v Addicted Member

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    Truly a slide whistle. Only other slide whistle music I can think of quickly is a cut by Bonzo Dog Band.

     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018 at 10:57 PM
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  11. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    LOL! A slide whistle? Haha! The Beach Boys used slide whistles on Pet Sounds and their abandoned album Smile... Brian Wilson was a genius. Okay. Was that recording made on wire, acoustical record cutter, or electrical record cutter with a microphone? Should be easy if you know the timeframe.
     

     

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  12. spicer

    spicer Super Member

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    The fidelity of the two seem too good to be straight mechanical but that's just a guess... other than the term orthophonic used for the first one.
     
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  13. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Mess up at 1:18. Guess he ran out of breath. There was no editing then! If you messed up, you just kept going and didn't care, or got a new disc/wire. Most record companies told the musicians to do the later. Now that I listen more closely, it sounds more like a slide whistle. Can't really tell by a recording that was made 98 years ago!
     
  14. g..v

    g..v Addicted Member

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    "Stolen" off the web:

    Theremins and theremin-like sounds started to be incorporated into popular music from the end of the 1940s (with a series of Samuel Hoffman/Harry Revel collaborations) and this has continued, with varying popularity, to the present.

    The Beach Boys' 1966 single "Good Vibrations" – though it does not technically contain a theremin – is the most frequently cited example of the instrument in pop music. The song actually features a type of theremin invented by Paul Tanner called an Electro-Theremin. Upon release, the single prompted an unexpected revival in theremins and increased the awareness of analog synthesizers. In response to requests by the band, Moog Music began producing their own brand of ribbon-controlled instruments which would mimic the sound of a theremin.

    Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin used a variation of the theremin (minus the loop) during performances of "Whole Lotta Love" and "No Quarter" throughout the performance history of Led Zeppelin, an extended multi-instrumental solo featuring theremin and bowed guitar in 1977, as well as the soundtrack for Death Wish II released in 1982. Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also used the instrument on the group's 1967 albums Between the Buttons and Their Satanic Majesties Request.[32] The Lothars are a Boston-area band formed in early 1997 whose CDs have featured as many as four theremins played at once – a first for pop music.[33] Although credited with a "Thereman" [sic] on the "Mysterons" track from the album Dummy, Portishead actually used a monophonic synthesizer to achieve theremin-like effects, as confirmed by Adrian Utley, who is credited as playing the instrument; he has also created similar sounds on the songs "Half Day Closing", "Humming", "The Rip", and "Machine Gun".[4]
     
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  15. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    You're correct on the first one. "Let it Rain, Let it Pour" was the first electrical dance band recording. "Whispering," I think, was mechanical. I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure Victor started using Westrex equipment in early 1925. That song was recorded in 1920, so it may be very possible that that song was recorded mechanically. Could be completely wrong, that's just my guess. Now, next song!
     
  16. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Nice article! I remember hearing a theremin throughout the 1951 film "The Day the Earth Stood Still." As said in the description, the Beach Boys did use a hand controlled theremin, they used an Electro Theremin, or slide theremin.
     

     

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  17. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    Now this is leaning toward the more difficult side of things. Harmony was a branch off Columbia Records, Harmony was a more budget record label.
     
  18. spicer

    spicer Super Member

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    I am not familiar with mechanical recordings except the few provided as early examples of recordings which always sounded to me like a two tin cans connected with a string... one for the mic end and one for the speaker end. I imagine they did refine the process though before amplification... the triode tube... but still, if any of these two are mechanical it is rather amazing for the quality, the dynamics.
     
  19. KaatheSnake

    KaatheSnake Well-Known Member

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmony_Records I'm pretty sure that disc was made mechanically. Could be wrong, but here's an article on that company.
     

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