Well, Christmas is thankfully over with.

Discussion in 'General Off Topic Forums' started by Sandy G, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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  2. Hobie1dog

    Hobie1dog Super Member

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    Commercialization killed it for me decades ago.
     
  3. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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    Sandy has my curiosity up regarding the Civil War events around Rogersville.

    Chattanooga fell to the Yankees around the same time the Confederates regained control of Rogersville. I haven't found a timeline for the Confederate withdrawal from Rogersville.

    Here's an interesting note about the "bottomless Blue Pond" on the Stipes farm. Longstreet's men dumped two wagons and four cannons into this pond because they couldn't move them.

    http://www.therogersvillereview.com/columns/article_06dd40ca-b395-11e4-8849-6fb08fec857a.html

    Hey Sandy...could you be talking about the Stipes farm ?
     
  4. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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    I'm guessing this is the Stipes Farm of legend.

    It would be interesting to find out who owns the property now.

    If the pond is dried up, this would be an excellent mission for someone with a video drone.
     
  5. Sandy G

    Sandy G Spiteful Old Cuss Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Oh, but there's an even BETTER story about the farm right adjacent to the Burem place, across a creek-named "Big Creek." In 1908, there was a terrific storm that came rattling thru here. Lightning. wind, it tore up Jack, as they say. After it was over, these couple of boys were out checking out the damage. They came across this one tree blown over, uprooted. As kids will do, they started rooting around, dug a bit & found a bunch of silver dolars. I think they eventually found a couple thousand, a considerable amount. Well, the story made the wire services, such as they were, & was printed apparently al over the country. Things calmed down, & several months later some guy wrote to the local newspaper & told his story. He claimed to be a paymaster-Forgive, I can't remember which side-& he & another soldier were riding thru this area to deliver the pay to one of the larger armies. They got ambushed, or waylaid & the situation looked desperate, They decided to bury the money & so they did. Think one of 'em was killed, maybe both wounded. Anyhow, they put half the money at the base of this one big tree, & the other half under one fairly close. Anyhow, as far as I know, the other half of the money has never been found...Or nobody ever owned up to finding it. Seems like I remember there was some other story connected w/this tale-The guy who wrote the newspaper in 1908 wouldn't reveal who he was or some such. Maybe he & the other soldier saw they had all this loot, nobody knew where they were, they decided to high tail it home...I knew a Roy Stipes when I was a kid. He was a neat old guy who had a gyroplane & he flew it all over during the warm months. I don't know about any "Stipes Farm"...
     
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  6. UncleBingo

    UncleBingo AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I could read this stuff all day. And not because I'm a slow reader (I ain't) : )
     
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  7. Sandy G

    Sandy G Spiteful Old Cuss Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Part of being a true son of the South is hopefully an ability to spin good stories. Most of the ones I've related here are true, as are these. Trust me, I couldn't-No way- dream up anything anywhere as good as they are ! This is the 2nd oldest town in Tennessee, there was a settlement here as early as 1785 or so. There is downtown the McKinney tavern which was the Union headquarters, across the street is the Kyle House, which was where the Confederates held court. I remember a lady named Kay Kyle when I was a kid, she'd run me home from school sometimes, it was a big deal for moi, 'cause she had one of those 1953 Studebaker Starliners, the neat 2 door coupe that Raymond Loewy designed. Now there's a woman who has a reflexology business in the Kyle house, along w/a realtor. The Tavern is still a tavern & inn, & you can get a surprisingly good meal there.
     
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  8. thilaseen

    thilaseen Super Member

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    This is better than talking about Xmas. After all it's only 347 days to go.
     
  9. Sandy G

    Sandy G Spiteful Old Cuss Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Way into the Sixties, people would walk on which side of the street their sentiments lay with. I'm a "Ticket splitter", I'd walk up one side while walking my dog, & then change sides on my way back home. We also had Swift Memorial college, which was a black college, & also served as de facto black education system before integration in 1962.Davy Crockett's grandparents were hung from a tree on the far side of town. We are a typical small, sleepy, Southern town-And yet, in so many ways, we're not...
     
  10. bobabode

    bobabode AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Heh. Got family that fought for both sides. Virginia and Pennsylvania. We finally wised up and headed west to Calitucky. (That's Orange county, Ca. a hotbed of Confederates some say...)
     
  11. BigElCat

    BigElCat Mmm Hmm Subscriber

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    My dad claimed we had a relative who was riding with Jeb Stuart when he showed up late to Gettysburg.

    I'd give that claim about a 70% chance of being true.

    My dad did have a uncle who was a bootlegger. I've seen pictures of his car, modified to carry flat bottles under the running boards. It wasn't moonshine, he ran commercially made booze to dry parts of the country and somehow made money by avoiding taxes.

    My mom's dad made moonshine up until the 1950's. He didn't sell it....just partied with his neighbors. Or so the story goes.
     

     

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  12. mgkfifty

    mgkfifty Active Member

    Been cleaning up glitter, I hate glitter.
     
  13. Sandy G

    Sandy G Spiteful Old Cuss Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Another good PoJo story- Not long after we got him, he & the Hereford bull at the next farm down the road got ito a bellowing match. PoJo broke outta the barnlot to go defend our farm's honour & silence the mangy Hereford. Now, Herefords are taller than Angus are, & they also can have HORNS which Angus lack. Anyhow he trots off to do battle. My Papaw sees him go, he grabs me & says "Let's go get yr Bull back. Me, being 7 or 8, was all hepped up for An Adventure. We caught up w/him almost to the next farm, Fritz-my papaw- simply walks up to him, grabs his ear & says "Come on, PoJo, you're outta yer league. W/his horns, he'll make mincemeat outta you".... PoJo said not a word, just came obligingly w/ Fritz & moi back up the road, we put him in his stall, chained it up real good & that was that. Tickles me when I hear stories of wild bulls bucking, snorting tossing guys in the air, etc. Yeah, I guess that's true, but my experience is a tad different-PoJo would more likely go to sleep, lock his legs & stand there whilst you scratched him all over w/a horse curry comb. Or slurp you across the face after you'd give him some sweet feed-corn, dried molasses, other grains in a 5 gallon bucket. He was a dear old soul & I will always have a soft spot in my heart for him.
     

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