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What is the earliest "Stereo" record, LP or 45 you own?

Discussion in 'Turntables' started by fredcohiba, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. longle

    longle Active Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Antal Dorati, 1812 Overture, Mercury Label (Mercury Living Presence), 1958. A three mic rerecording of the mono recording made in 1954. I have both.

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    Soundtrack of South Pacific, RCA Living Stereo, 1958. I have four variations of this album.

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  2. nkorah

    nkorah Active Member

    Messages:
    280
    Location:
    Tel-Aviv
    What are we talking about exactly?

    If looking for the first press, than it's - TRI 33330/31/32

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    It's "electrically transferred to stereo" but the record has stereo grooving, and was pressed on 1956

    Earliest recording in my collection is - VICS-1404

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    It was pressed only in 1966, but is a genuine stereo recording from 1956.

    The earliest "official" stereo recording, in my collection is - S35445 from 1957

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  3. Artie

    Artie AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Jax, Fl
    I just realized the significance of your question. I didn't even catch the word "stereo" in the thread title. If that 45 wasn't stereo, (I think it was), then my first would have been Jimi Hendrix - Axis Bold as Love LP.
     
  4. beatcomber

    beatcomber AK Member

    Messages:
    17,543
    Location:
    Lexington, Massachusetts
    I have an early west coast pressing of that Sinatra LP, and it sounds spooky-real. Frank and the orchestra are right there in the room with you, alive and vibrant.

    Early Capitol LPs were pretty spectacular, although it's been observed that around '62 they started "dumbing down" LP mastering through aggressive compression and shaving off the frequencies at both ends. The belief is they were probably getting too many returns at the retail level because the average phonographs of the era were not able to track the dynamics, and the distributors were complaining. That's one of several reasons why '60s US Beatles and Beach Boys LPs sound so lousy. But those glorious '50s LPs by Sinatra, Nat, etc. sound amazing!

    Incidentally, the pressings with lacquers cut at the Tower are the ones to get; they have an "H" ("Hollywood") in the deadwax. The ones with "W" in the deadwax had the lacquers cut in NYC from a tape copy, and are one generation higher than the Hollywood cuts.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
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  5. Christian B

    Christian B AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,934
    Location:
    Middle of the Jersey shore
    Good information. Now I'll have to look at a few dozen records for that "H" or "W". I agree with you on those early Capitol records. Wonderful!
     
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  6. Artie

    Artie AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,805
    Location:
    Jax, Fl
    Speaking of Beatles records, does anyone remember the early Beatles records, (on the Columbia label, IIRC), that were mixed vocals on one channel, and instruments on the other. They were truly awful. Even as a teenager.
     
  7. longle

    longle Active Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I picked up this interesting pressing yesterday. The original soundtrack was released in mono in 1954 then this stereo pressing was released in 1956. What also makes it interesting is it contains 2 extra tracks, both by Louis Armstrong.

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  8. VintageVibe

    VintageVibe Active Member

    Messages:
    241
    Shelly Manne Live at the Blackhawk Vol 1. 1960.


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    Last edited: May 23, 2017

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