1. Rest in Peace Paul (Kegger) If you would like to help the family in this time of great sorrow and need, you may donate on their GoFundme page: https://www.gofundme.com/mckechnie-medical-and-funeral-fund?
    Dismiss Notice

Where to buy tuner dial cord string

Discussion in 'Tuners' started by Tripqzon, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. Tripqzon

    Tripqzon Super Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Location:
    Maine
    I've read some threads on restringing tuner dials but I haven't seen anything on where you folks buy replacement strings.

    So my question is: Where does one buy dial string?

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  2. boyon00

    boyon00 My old Canucky home

    Why not dental floss?
     
  3. steve gibson

    steve gibson Super Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    fort dodge Iowa
    Any heavy braided cord will work. I use heavy (50#test) fishing line.
     
  4. dr*audio

    dr*audio Fish fingers and custard! Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,964
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    www.tubesandmore.com used to have it but I don't see it on the website. I'd give them a call. Failing that, the dental floss sounds good. I wouldn't use nylon fishing line, it will probably slip.
     
  5. KingBubba

    KingBubba "Too Much Stuff" Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,340
    Location:
    Brooksville, Fl.
    The braided dacron fishing line will not stretch or slip and is very durable. It should work. BTW it is expensive so shop around and look for leader material not the full spools.
     
  6. Paul C

    Paul C Super Member

    Messages:
    3,687
    Location:
    USA
  7. dr*audio

    dr*audio Fish fingers and custard! Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,964
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Excellent lead, Paul! They have lots of other useful stuff, too, like Novus Plastic Polish, and high voltage caps. :thmbsp:
     
  8. Tripqzon

    Tripqzon Super Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Location:
    Maine
    Wow. Only $2.75 and free shipping. Cool!!

    I will definitely keep the other suggestions in mind though. I'm not ready to attempt it yet as the slippage is extremely minimal at this point.

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  9. Paul C

    Paul C Super Member

    Messages:
    3,687
    Location:
    USA
    Also this

    http://www.radiodaze.com/dialbelts.htm (and other cool stuff)

    And check THIS out!

    http://www.philcoradio.com/tech/dialcord.htm They show some "Crochet Nylon" cord. Just read this page.

    "If you encounter any problems with slipping of the cord, coat the cord with violin rosin. Violin rosin is made in a block, built into a wooden holder, and is sold at music stores. Simply drag the cord across the rosin block until it is well coated, then install the cord on the dial drive assembly of the radio."

    From Clifford Berthelsen: "I too use that nylon cord for dial cord, but I cover it with Elmer's rubber cement and let it dry. It remains just slightly sticky and have used it where difficulty was encountered."


    Dr*Audio... my google-fu is strong.
     
  10. SoCal Sam

    SoCal Sam Lunatic Member

    Messages:
    16,557
    Timely thread...I've got to do a receiver soon. Any suggestions on how to tie a knot that won't slip? And, I think I'll use shrink tube to cover the knot.
     
  11. dr*audio

    dr*audio Fish fingers and custard! Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,964
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Tie the knot and put superglue on the knot. Works like a charm.
     
  12. blue_lateral

    blue_lateral ...

    Messages:
    1,632
    Location:
    Washington State
    I second the fishing line thing. As others have noted, you can still get real dial string. It comes in several sizes, if you count all the stuff on ebay, in addition to radiodaze, etc.

    I posed this same question in the antiqueradios.com forums a while back, mainly because I didnt know what size to get. At least part of the stuff in the unit I was working on was obviously not original. The radio was a National NC-33 shortwave.

    The first response I got suggested "gorilla" fishing line from wal-mart. Several others concurred, or at least concurred that the best stuff would be sold for catching fish. I usually don't do wal-mart, but I went there and bought some in the heaviest guage they had. This is woven stuff, NOT clear monofilament fishing line.

    It was kind of expensive because I had to buy a whole roll of it. My great great great grandkids will probably have a lifetime supply of dial cord.

    It works unbelievably well. It is also easier to work with than the real thing, because it is a little floppier. I have zero slippage with this, and I'm not running the cords very tight. I didn't have to resort to rosin or anything like that. You absoluetly must put a drop of super glue or similar on your knots. They will slip otherwise. I found this out by not gluing them.

    Dental floss works in a pinch. I have a Meissner "Traffic Master" shortwave that has had green dental floss in the bandspread dial since the early 80's. It lasted ok, but it's not as good as this gorilla stuff. Not even close.

    I would pick out something close to the original diameter, if you know what size it was. It might matter. Where the cord wraps around a shaft, it will walk down the shaft as you tune the dial. If the cord is too big, and the designer cut it close, you might run out of shaft before you get to the other end of the dial.

    Good luck.

    John
     
  13. Tripqzon

    Tripqzon Super Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Location:
    Maine
    My Marantz 125 has a spring on the FM Tuning Cap pulley to take up slack. So I imagine if I keep the string snug as I route it that the spring would absorb any of the slack that may exist after moving the tuning knob across the dial a couple of times. Is this correct?

    Paul
     
  14. dr*audio

    dr*audio Fish fingers and custard! Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,964
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Yep! I try to do it so the spring is stretched out to maybe 1.5 times it's length when I tie the knot.
     
  15. Tripqzon

    Tripqzon Super Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Location:
    Maine
    Thanks Again All. :yes:

    Paul
     
  16. Cosmic Charlie

    Cosmic Charlie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    800
    Got any old miniblinds, salvage the cord, wax it w/ parrafin wax, and string it. I bought some cotton cord from a fabric store, turns out its the same stuff as miniblind cord, no slippage, use plenty of wax. CC
     
  17. merrylander

    merrylander AK Member Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,669
    Location:
    Glenwood, MD 21738
    If there is a Michael's or other craft store in your area the #6 bead string works like a charm on these vintage sets. One card will do any receiver that is out there, about $2.50.

    Rob
     
  18. Tripqzon

    Tripqzon Super Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Location:
    Maine
    I love this place. You guys have all the answers.

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  19. hlmiller

    hlmiller Geek wannabe

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    What about glue for the cord?

    Hi guys, I have a slightly different problem: the cord is intact, but the tuner slider was attached to the cord with a spot of glue that has since become disattached. The old glue is there, and if I set it just right onto the tuner slider bar that it was attached to originally, it'll stay if I'm real careful. I'd like to glue the old glue back to the tuner bar -- it formed itself to fit into the bar just right, it just needs to stay put -- but not sure what to use.

    Any suggestions? The old glue is black --

    H
     
  20. Bozzmonster

    Bozzmonster Sabrina Says 'Feed Me!'

    Messages:
    2,121
    Location:
    Royal Oak, MI
    Possibly use two part epoxy? I'd imagine the slider backing is plastic, so I'd look for a glue that won't burn through the plastic. For that reason, airplane model glue is a no go. Clean what you can of the old glue first.

    On the string issue, I had slippage of the tuner string on an old Technics receiver I had. Turned out the string was a bit stretched out. I simply wound the string around the tuner shaft one more time to stretch out the spring holding the string a bit and thereby making the string a little more taut. Worked like a charm!
     

Share This Page