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Where to buy tuner dial cord string

Discussion in 'Tuners' started by Tripqzon, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. John James

    John James "Bob's your uncle" (Stolen) Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,189
    Location:
    Piney Flats, Tn.
    I have bought dial cord here (http://www.radiodaze.com/dialbelts.htm) in the past. It had glass fibers inside with woven nylon covering them. It will not stretch. They have always been good to do business with.

    (No affiliation)
     
  2. nbarber

    nbarber I was once told "That is a damn good stereo". Subscriber

    Messages:
    967
    Location:
    Seattle
    :banana::banana::banana:
     
  3. Punker X

    Punker X AK Subscriber Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,864
    Location:
    Panic in Detroit
    Alenne's Tacky glue works well for attaching the slider/pointer.
     
  4. Barry8Track

    Barry8Track New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Using dental floss or fishing line are two of the best ideas I've ever heard, thanks guys! I mainly work on classic car radios, and the few models that use a dial cord have much thinner cord material than what is available. The thinnest I've seen at places like Radio Daze is .032 which is too fat to get the required number of turns before running out of shaft in these tight spaces. I'll definitely try dental floss!
     
  5. Barry8Track

    Barry8Track New Member

    Messages:
    5
    The dial cord I generally need is much thinner than the smallest size I've found anywhere which is .028. The original dial cord in mid 60's Ford radios appears to be closer to .015, so I followed the advice of a fellow forum member and found Power Pro fishing line (braided Spectra Fiber) at my local Wal Mart sporting goods department. I purchased the heaviest size I saw which was 65 pound test. This diameter is extremely close to the dial cord I needed, and I was very happy to see it works fabulously on the last two radios I worked on. It's about 15 bucks for 150 yards, WAY cheaper than actual dial cord - and doesn't fray nearly as much when cut. I found that using an Exacto knife with a fresh blade cuts it very cleanly.

    I considered using dental floss also, but was concerned about its slippery nature and it just didn't "feel" good. The fishing line matches the properties of dial cord much more closely, and I'll be using the Power Pro fishing line for all future jobs.
     
    John James likes this.

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