Why The Velvet Underground’s landmark debut album still resonates after 50 years

Discussion in 'Music Forums' started by BLAH BLAH, Nov 11, 2017.

  1. BLAH BLAH

    BLAH BLAH AK Subscriber Subscriber

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  2. loopstick

    loopstick AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I think a lot of the "alchemy" was the immunity that the NYC streets had against the pervasive hippy-dippy of the times. You weren't gonna end up with something wimpy or lame. No other city could hatch something like this. Even the rotting rust-belt giant where I'm from - Detroit - famous for edgy bands like the Stooges and MC5, would never in a million years produce a Velvet Underground.
     
  3. eljr

    eljr Koyaanisqatsi Subscriber

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    great observation :beerchug:
     
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  4. BlindBoyGrnt

    BlindBoyGrnt Nullius in verba Subscriber

    You NYC guys get to claim this album as your own, lucky you.
     
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  5. bobsvinyl

    bobsvinyl Painfully Aware Subscriber

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    I love the album. It always reminded me of the nihilistic pre-war cabaret music of Germany mixed with folk, classical and other influences. I was an art major in college and I was very interested in the Dada and Surrealist movements. V.U.'s first album was like a soundtrack to that art period.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
  6. eljr

    eljr Koyaanisqatsi Subscriber

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    spinning it now

    ;)
     
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  7. eljr

    eljr Koyaanisqatsi Subscriber

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    very cool :thumbsup:
     
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  8. BlindBoyGrnt

    BlindBoyGrnt Nullius in verba Subscriber

    Think I'll join you.
     
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  9. grillebilly

    grillebilly Empty Head Subscriber

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    First thoughts before reading the article are how influential it was to musicians and how it wasn't as popular in 1970 as it was 20 years later. Then I read this in the article
    "The album was a slow burner, selling only 30,000 copies in five years, though as Brian Eno famously said, “everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band”
     
  10. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    I remember what a dark dingy window on an exotic urban underworld this was for those not acquainted with this realm of city life, when it was released ca 1967.
    Exciting in some ways, but ultimately not a place I'd want to stay at this stage of my life.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
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  11. Watch some decent films from the 70’s hincluding the German avant- gardej to get a feeling of the grittiness of urban life in that period.

    Places like New York (San Francisco, London and Berlin) were attractive to people ready to become iconoclasts because they were tired of the increasingly dull pablum that came from the increasing suburbanization of the US and the dissatisfaction with conformity in the face of outright turmoil. Yes, location as well as economics inspires music.

    Issues like the political turmoil inEurope and the US including Vietnam furthered by the drivel of conformity expressed in music like pop singles that included “How Much is that Doggy in the Window?” helped to inspire a generation fueled by their parents with their increasing middle class wealth.

    People like Lou Reed seemed to come along at the the right time to feed on and channel this turmoil into music that would affect generations to follow.
     
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  12. olson_jr

    olson_jr AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Sounds like a good name for a band.
     
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  13. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    Frank Zappa took a similar "artitude" in his early years of social satire, before musicmaking for it's own sake became his cause celebre'.
     
  14. misterjones

    misterjones Active Member

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    I'm going to John Cale's 50th anniversary performance of the album in Brooklyn on Friday. I'm also going to the John Cale tribute concert the following night. I'm hoping for lots of special guests.
     
  15. Pio1980

    Pio1980 AK Member Subscriber

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    Recently saw Suburbicon. Biting social commentary on the 1950s American social culture.
     
  16. petemcfc

    petemcfc Active Member

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    I saw John Cale in 1986,The Festival of the Tenth Summer,Manchester G-Mex,he was mid bill followed by The Fall,then The Smiths,New Order headlined.
    Ive seen some drugged up performances over the years,Evan Dando springs to mind,but he was in a bad place that day.

    He made this for BBC Wales,its very insightful.
     
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  17. misterjones

    misterjones Active Member

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    Thanks for the post. I will have to check it out.

    Sometimes it seems that the biggest proponents of drugs are those who know very little (or even nothing) about them. I'd like to hear what someone like Cale - who likely has seen and done it all - thinks.
     
  18. pmsummer

    pmsummer simul justus et peccator

    Andy vs. Lou. Plus that darn Julliard Brit.
     
  19. tubed

    tubed Lunatic Member

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  20. tubed

    tubed Lunatic Member

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