You may only keep one guitar...

Discussion in 'Musical Instruments' started by Ross6860, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. BushmasterM4

    BushmasterM4 Active Member

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    195
    My keeper would be my red 80's Fender Lead 1. Have 15 to choose from (Gibson, Fender, G&L, Heartfield, Carvin) and many of those cost 5 times the cost of the vintage Fender Lead 1. But it is just so comfortable and plays and sounds great. Second would be the Gibson Corvus II.
     
  2. Mystic

    Mystic We're all born mad Subscriber

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    I once owned a Lead 1 and was pretty happy with it as a player. Eneded up selling (more likely throwing into a trade deal) it in the mid 1990s but recall it sounding really nice into a '54 Fender Deluxe.
     
  3. Ross6860

    Ross6860 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    The "Crow"...

    Like a two or three year production run? Pretty rare piece. Nice.

    How do you like your Carvin? My first real guitar was a DC127. I still have it. As with most of my "nice" guitars, it was a gift from my wife. The Carvin pickups stand up next to any of the custom stuff I've tried, and their like $50.
     
  4. BushmasterM4

    BushmasterM4 Active Member

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    195
    I own a 1988 Carvin V220 (year they switched to neck thru) and a 1988 DC127 and both are great. The DC127 I ordered new back in 1988 and will never part with it. It would be third on my list. I did change the neck pickup to a D'Marzio PAF Pro but didn't like it. So I switched it back to the stock Carvin pickup. I really like Carvin, well, Kiesel guitars. The build quality is fantastic. I keep looking at the California Single Cutaways and the V's. I think next on my list will be a Carvin or Kiesel California Single. Ive tried many Gibson Les Pauls (Studio, Standards and Customs) but just don't like the build quality on them. Seem cheap if that makes since. And I know the Les Paul style Carvin will be a quality guitar.

    Another sleeper guitar brand is the G&L Tribute series. I have a Fiorano, Ascari, and the Jerry Cantrell Rampage models. These are all Indonesia made, but the feel and quality is fantastic. I really like the sound and feel on these. These guitars are very reasonable in price. Best foreign made guitars Ive come across, well other than Japanese models.
     
  5. Ross6860

    Ross6860 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    G&L, Hamer, etc., any of the Indonesian guitars I've had were quite nice.

    For Carvin, when folks ask me I tell them go look at a higher-end PRS and the Carvin is built just as well (maybe better...).

    The Korean Epiphones can be very nice, also. The recent Japanese Epis are even better.

    Another real sleeper is Agile. They make real maple-top LP clones with ebony boards, Grovers, Tusq nuts and saddles, great fret wire, etc. Had one but sold it just because I have too many guitars. I heartily recommend them.

    I wouldn't buy a new Gibson unless I got a smokin' deal. Don't know what they make that I could possibly want now. Maybe a true hollow-body with humbuckers, but that's it. Most of those are way out of my price range unless I sell off a couple others.

    I did get a Custom Shop ES-330 several years ago, and I'm not getting rid of it;) It did have a wiring problem right out of the box. Part of why I got a steal on it. Guitar wiring is pretty darn simple. so it was an easy fix once you figure out how to get the pots in and out of a hollow body guitar (trick...use string to pull them back into position. Also, pull the darn pickups for access to the body. It makes a huge difference.). But really, a wiring problem on a CS guitar? That's not really acceptable.
     
  6. VfB Stefan

    VfB Stefan Nachtmusik

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    What a beautiful instrument...I cannot play a lick of guitar, but I put a bid on the same guitar at a charity auction last spring (did not win...but it raised a nice penny). Enjoy it however you can!
     
  7. Ross6860

    Ross6860 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thanks.

    Some people would say I can't play a lick, either.;) A lot of times I would agree with them...
     
  8. SuperLead100

    SuperLead100 "These go to 11"

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    I've been through this and sold off all but two guitars...and the winners to stay are my 1992 Hamer USA Sunburst and extremely rare 1981 Takamine F-370sk (solid spruce top with Koa back and sides modeled after a Martin D-28 sans the Koa).
     
  9. louisjames

    louisjames The "real" Louis James Subscriber

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    Those 1980's Takamine's are great guitars. I have a 12 string from the same time period and it's been one of the very few acoustics that has been persistent in my collection. The "Martin-like" logo is a nice touch as well. Please post a pic if you can. A Koa b/s Takamine IS very rare and would love to see it.
     
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  10. Ross6860

    Ross6860 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I should sell some, but most of what I have left were all gifts from my wife.

    SG '61 RI - Christmas 2011
    2001 LP Standard - 50th Birthday (I got it with permission...)
    2001 LP Classic Plus Top - 50th Birthday (A surprise from my wife)
    Carvin DC127 - Christmas 1996
    Fender CS Bonnie Raitt Strat #8 of #200, SIgned - 55th Birthday

    I guess I'll keep her:thumbsup:
     
  11. SuperLead100

    SuperLead100 "These go to 11"

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    Yeah, I think you should...! If I even look at a guitar for shits and giggles all I get is "No!" I"ll keep her anyway.;)
     
  12. SuperLead100

    SuperLead100 "These go to 11"

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    I was working in a music store in the early eighties and that guitar just sat on the wall for the longest time; nobody wanted to buy it. In those days there were a great many people that wouldn't touch anything made in Japan. I always remember noodling on it when I had time and loved it, I kept coming back to it over and over again. I never understood the "Jap" guitar bias that existed; all anyone had to do was play and listen to it. Anyway, one day I just pulled the trigger and bought it. I still love it!

    I'll snap a few picks and post them soon.:thumbsup:
     
  13. jack_shite

    jack_shite New Member

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    19
    A friend of a friend gave me an hour by myself in his studio with his '59 Burst.
    I've owned several vintage guitars of note ('54 LP Junior, 1st 500 made), '60 LP Junior, 60's SG's, '63 Strat, '68 LP Custom, etc, etc...

    My mid-80's MIJ Fender Telecaster Custom mutt stands up with the best I've played, and I don't have much more than a grand into it, with a re-radius/refret from the best luthier around.
    Looks almost like a real 60's Tele Custom from being played nonstop for 30-something years, just has a certain something...

    That '59 was amazing, but I could get 90% there with a decent booteek LP for less than 5k, and not miss a thing.
    I'm a player, not a collector.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017 at 12:34 PM
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  14. louisjames

    louisjames The "real" Louis James Subscriber

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    Just because it's a "59 Burst" doesn't mean it's a great guitar or greater than any other guitar you can buy that doesn't require selling a kidney or mortgaging your house. I have played vintage guitars that are simply great and others that are dogs. Same for guitars in all eras. I had a beautiful 69 Strat that I got from Guitar Trader in Red Bank back in the day. Completely mint in every way and no matter who worked on it, it always plinked like a banjo. It's probably worth around 8-9K these days but the modern Strat I replaced it with was hands down the better guitar. The saddest thing I ever saw was an incredibly flamed 59 LP that never saw the light of day nor could the owner even play more than a few chords. Guess he earned it and more power to these folks if that's their bent. Like you, I'm a player and while I don't mind a beautiful looking guitar, give me one that plays and sounds good first. And your MIJ Tele Custom is a great example of a really well crafted guitar made better with a top-flight refret / neck work. Please post a pic. Would love to see it.
     
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  15. cratz2

    cratz2 Addicted Member

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    I have a couple partscaster s that I really like.

    Both are surfy colors (one coral, one surf green) both have Robert Cray signature necks, both have boutique vintage flavored pickups with a hotter pickup in the bridge position and both have the ability to run the neck and bridge pickup at the same time.
     
  16. Northwinds

    Northwinds Huh? Turn what down? Subscriber

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    Curious, why? You do realize that the bulk of Les Paul's out there are Norlin's right? After Henry took control of Gibson, the quality has went down and the price up. The Historics are nice though but again, way over priced. Now we have so many different versions of the Les Paul I don't even bother looking at what's currently available. Give me a plain old Standard and I am ready to go. Are you a actual player or just a dabbler. You sound sort of like one of the dudes on MLP w/ the Norlin dislike yet MLP members like Joe Bonamasso love the Norlin's??? I base my opinion on 40 years of actual playing. I am also a fan of the Japanese Ibanez Destroyer's, Rocket Roll's and Iceman's, the very rare Japanese Shiro Les Paul copies, all the 4 digit Hamer USA Standards. I grew up with Norlin's, yep played a '59 burst also when no one gave a rip about them and you could get one for around $800 or less. and it was a nice guitar, I really like the pickups most as that Les Paul growl is intoxicating with a Marshall

    More of my Norlin's

    [​IMG]

    ^^^ '81 Standard

    [​IMG]

    ^^^^ My 1st e/2 CMT, a 1979

    [​IMG]

    Several other, the 1979 e/2 (I had the matching v/2 also), 1980 CMT e/2 DTM custom and 1981 e/2 CMT. The trans purple e/2 is one of David Thomas McNaught's 1st customs before he started his own company. The '81 CMT e/2 has the Duncan P-Rails installed. They are ugly as sin but sounded great

    [​IMG]

    This is the only Norlin I have owned that I could not bond to, it is a 1993 Classic Plus

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Lastly, if not for Norlin taking over Gibson, the brand would have disappeared and the Norlin years brought Gibson back to the forefront. Sure there is turds out there but there is way more turds out there now under Henry's leadership not to mention several rather ugly guitars, robo tuners etc.... Rough fret ends on the new Gibson's drive me nuts. I actually prefer Dean and Hamer USA guitars for build quality over ANY Henry era Gibson's

    My current Explorer is a 2010, yes a Henry guitar but I had to look at 10 of them before I found one that was "right"
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
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  17. SuperLead100

    SuperLead100 "These go to 11"

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    Henry Juszkiewicz bought Gibson in 1986 so your classic plus isn't a Norlin. Probably to your point.
    I will say that in my opinion Gibson quality became better when Henry J took over. I had an early 80's Norlin LP standard that was quite substandard. The top was 3 piece maple with the seams showing in the finish. I was too young to appreciate how inferior it was. I had a '94 Classic plus that was very well made and toneful; when push came to shove the '92 Hamer Sunburst beat it out...I still have it;)

    @Northwinds
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
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  18. Ross6860

    Ross6860 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm definitely a "dabbler". No one's paying me for my musical talent, or lack thereof.

    I bought my first guitar in 1975, with my own money saved from mowing lawns. A fender F-35.

    I was a "trained" musician at that time. About 8 years of classical organ. Haven't played the organ in nearly 40 years. Playing things that don't interest you as a 8-15 year-old doesn't lead to a long-term love of the instrument.

    I've played and taken several multi-year hiatuses since 1975. Roughly 8-10 years of daily playing throughout the last 40 years.

    I've owned Gibson, Fender, Gretsch, Taylor, Hamer, Epiphone, Agile, Kramer, and I've built a couple guitars. I've owned a boatload of amps from a 1-watt Blackheart to a 100-watt Carvin head. Fender, Marshall, Peavey, Carvin, Blackheart, VOX, Valco, Epiphone, Silvertone, and Magnatone.


    I should have been quite specific about the Norlin era guitars I was commenting about.

    I would not own one of the pancake body, multi-piece top, multi-piece neck, or any of the other sub-standard construction method built LP guitars of the Norlin era. Just like I didn't really want a new multi-piece body LP. Not because I may not play well, but because the price is not in line with the construction.

    To me, a Les Paul needs a one-piece mahogany body with a two-piece maple cap and a one piece mahogany neck. Preferably no weight relief or chambering.

    Gibson makes crap today, and they make great guitars today. I'm sure there are great individual guitars of the Norlin era, and it looks like you have a few, but I have no desire to seek one out.

    Just like you won't have a weight-relieved, or chambered LP, I don't want a pancake body LP. You believe there is a tonal difference, and without scientific testing I wouldn't discount that belief out of hand, but my personal feelings are there is little to no measurable difference.

    Same amp, same strings, same pickups and electronics, same player, same room...just change the guitar body and neck, I don't think anyone could hear the difference in a double-blind test. I don't think it can be measured either. Give me Pearly Gates and I'll still sound like me, not Billy Gibbons (even though I try and steal every one of his licks and pattern a lot of my playing after his style). Give Mr. Gibbons my '01 LP and he'll still sound like Billy Gibbons.

    I paid $400 for my two-piece body, multi-piece top, chambered LP (that I said I wouldn't have). It cost me about 10 cents worth of Titebond to repair it and maybe a $5 bottle of tung oil to refinish it. I would not have paid $1200 for it. It plays wonderfully, sounds very good, and I have a "beater" Gibson. It's also a P-90 loaded model and my other LPs are loaded with humbuckers.

    So offer me a beautiful Norlin era LP for $1000 and I'll probably eat crow. ;)

    I apologize if I offended any Norlin owners out there. That was not my intent.
     
  19. SuperLead100

    SuperLead100 "These go to 11"

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    My first guitar teacher had a beautifully made Norlin era Les Paul...but he searched far and wide to find it. I was in high school and couldn't wait to get my first real Les Paul and had the music store order it. I should have been as discerning as my teacher...I would of had a keeper. If I were in the market for a LP I'd own a Norlin era guitar...but I'd search far and wide to find the right one.
     
  20. jack_shite

    jack_shite New Member

    Messages:
    19
    [​IMG]

    Right now it's apart for a little maintenance...
    This pic is from late last year.
    The body is MIJ, with perfect wear and yellowing to the binding, but no crazing or chips to the clear.
    I swapped a MIM neck that had a really nice feel, re-radiused to 9.5", new nut, and frets done by Mark Balash.
    He was really taken aback with the neck, and demonstrated the quality by attempting to bend the headstock. We couldn't get any flex. He grabbed a Fender CS Tele and did the same thing, with significant forward flex just with hand pressure.
    The whole guitar weighs in the upper 7lbs, well balanced, very loud acoustically and very resonant.
    The tuners are Gotohs with a modern ratio, Mastery string tree, Barden bridge with Rutters compensated saddles, RS Electronics Super Pot volume and tone pots, cap.
    It was setup as an Esquire when I bought it, so a new pickguard was bought, hence the lack of wear and bright white color. The Esquire 'guard matches the binding wear much better, but I don't go for fake patina.
    The Barden pickups have been swapped for Dimarzio Area T neck and Area Hot T bridge.

    It sounds like a plank with a couple microphones stuck in it, dynamic and alive. Just barks through my amps, but very sweet when I need it to be.

    I usually pair it with a couple Vox amps; an AC15 1-12 with a Scumback G12H30 type, and an AC30 with Celestion Alnico Blues.
     
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